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PLHRT 1101

Greenhouse field trip

Students in Horticultural Science and Systems (PLHRT 1101)  got a glimpse of what’s going on in the new Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory, Plant Science Greenhouses, and Kenneth Post Lab Greenhouse Complex on a walking tour led by Neil Mattson, associate professor in the Horticulture Section last Friday.

Highlights included viewing what Cornell’s first-to-flower titan arum ‘Wee Stinky’ looks like during its vegetative stage, with its single leaf pressing the rafters (below).

PLHRT 1101 students view 'Wee Stinky' in its vegetative stage.

PLHRT 1101 students view ‘Wee Stinky’ in its vegetative stage.

Urban soils ‘field trip’

Students in Horticultural Science and Systems (PLHRT 1101) got a glimpse of what’s going on underground Friday when instructor Frank Rossi, associate professor in the Horticulture Section, took them on a whirlwind tour of urban soils on the Cornell campus, including these highlights …

Succulents grow in ultra-light container soil mixes on Fernow Hall’s green roof:

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Soils amended with compost using the ‘scoop and dump’  technique support shrubs in the bio-swales east of Rice Hall:

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Sand-based soils keep the soccer field well-drained but require regular irrigation:

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Unirrigated sand-based soils support tall fescue turf on living roof courtyard between Weill Hall and Biotechnology Building:

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Compost-amended soils support turf in the ILR School courtyard despite wear and tear from tents and traffic. Rossi uses a penetrometer to measure soil compaction:

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Turf planted on CU-Structural Soil helped us learn about why turf dies in winter along Tower Road:

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HORT 1101: Indigo dye

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

The lab for the week has become an annual tradition: Another hands-on/take home on producing indigo dye from Indigofera tinctoria. We’ve been exploring the culture, history and chemistry of indigo dye, culminating in this week’s lab where students used indigo dye to to create a class banner and turn a piece of clothing into a work of art to take home.

This artistic endeavor was a perfect ending to a semester exploring the art and science of horticulture.

HORT 1101 students with banner and clothing dyed in Friday's lab.Preview

 

HORT 1101 students visit Kenneth Post Lab greenhouses

Each fall, associate professor Frank Rossi introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). Last Friday, with the help of associate professor and greenhouse horticulture specialist Neil Mattson, those students got a firsthand look at the various operations at Kenneth Post Lab greenhouses, including viewing poinsettias grown by Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club and Wee Stinky, the about-to-bloom titan arum that is part of the Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium‘s collection.

View more HORT 1101 posts.

hort 1101 at kpl

 

hort 1101 at kpl

Photos: Frank Rossi

 

Signs of Fall #3

Students in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems) give Minns Garden a fall cleanup.

Minns Garden cleanup

HORT 1101 students visit Cornell Orchards

Each fall, associate professor Frank Rossi introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). With the help of associate professor and viticulture specialist Justine Vanden Heuvel, those students got hands-on experience harvesting Concord grapes, measuring their sugar levels and turning them into grape juice on a sunny afternoon last Friday at Cornell Orchards.

View more HORT 1101 posts.

HORT 1101 students with grape harvest

HORT 1101 students with grape harvest


Click thumbnails for larger view.

HORT 1101: Indigo dye

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

We’ve been exploring the culture, history and chemistry of dye from the plant Indigofera tinctoria, culminating in this week’s lab where students used indigo dye to to create a class banner and turn a piece of clothing into a work of art to take home.

Click on images for larger view.  See indigo art from last year’s class.

Wednesday lab

Wednesday lab

Friday lab

Friday lab

Dilmun Hill videos

Dilmun Hill — Cornell’s student-run organic farm — was recently featured in a Cornell Daily Sun video:

It was also the subject of two student videos (here and here) following a visit from the HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems) class:

This week in HORT 1101 – Indigo dye

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

This week’s class focused on the the Fabiaceae family. We sampled hummus and “peanuts” from leguminous crops in lecture. The highlight of the week in lecture was the exploration of the art of horticulture with Marcia Eames-Sheavly, and then the culture, history and chemistry of Indigo dying.

The lab for the week kept with the hands-on/take home theme from the entire semester by producing indigo dye from Indigofera tinctoria. Then each student dyed an piece of clothing to take home and contributed to the lab section banner that hangs outside Plant Science 47C.

This artistic endeavor was a perfect ending to a semester exploring the art and science of horticulture.

Teaching assistant Kevin Panke-Buisse with indigo-dyed T-shirt.

Teaching assistant Keven Panke-Buisse with indigo-dyed T-shirt

Preparing to unfurl the banner in Wednesday's lab.

Preparing to unfurl the banner in Wednesday's lab.

Wednesday lab's creations.

Wednesday lab's creations.

Friday lab's creations.

Friday lab's creations.

This week in HORT 1101 – Flower fun

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

Seasonal bouquets, a bonus from Bluegrass Lane clean-up.

Seasonal bouquets, a bonus from Bluegrass Lane clean-up.

This week in class, Neil Matson taught us all about the floriculture industry, and how flowering plants are grown, harvested, processed, marketed and ultimately enjoyed. Cheni Filios, our teaching assistant, also discussed how flower bulbs are used as potted plants, cut flowers and in the landscape.

Planting bulbs at Bluegrass Lane.

Planting bulbs at Bluegrass Lane.

For our hands-on lab experience, we traveled to the Bluegrass Lane Turfgrass and Landscape Research and Education Center, just off campus near the golf course. There, we helped with the fall clean-up. We removed plants from beds where the annual flower trials were conducted by Bill Miller’s Flower Bulb Research Program and cut back the perennials to ensure excellent growth and performance in the spring.

We also split up into groups to plant bulbs for a perennialization trial to evaluate how well the bulbs return over several years.

The weather was ideally crisp and so delightfully bright and sunny that many of the students caught the spirit and created their own bouquets of dried flowers and ornamental grasses.

Cleaning up annual flower trial beds.

Cleaning up annual flower trial beds.

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