Archive for the “HORT 1101” Category

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

The lab for the week has become an annual tradition: Another hands-on/take home on producing indigo dye from Indigofera tinctoria. We’ve been exploring the culture, history and chemistry of indigo dye, culminating in this week’s lab where students used indigo dye to to create a class banner and turn a piece of clothing into a work of art to take home.

This artistic endeavor was a perfect ending to a semester exploring the art and science of horticulture.

HORT 1101 students with banner and clothing dyed in Friday's lab.Preview

 

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Each fall, associate professor Frank Rossi introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). Last Friday, with the help of associate professor and greenhouse horticulture specialist Neil Mattson, those students got a firsthand look at the various operations at Kenneth Post Lab greenhouses, including viewing poinsettias grown by Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club and Wee Stinky, the about-to-bloom titan arum that is part of the Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium‘s collection.

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hort 1101 at kpl

 

hort 1101 at kpl

Photos: Frank Rossi

 

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Students in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems) give Minns Garden a fall cleanup.

Minns Garden cleanup

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Each fall, associate professor Frank Rossi introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). With the help of associate professor and viticulture specialist Justine Vanden Heuvel, those students got hands-on experience harvesting Concord grapes, measuring their sugar levels and turning them into grape juice on a sunny afternoon last Friday at Cornell Orchards.

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HORT 1101 students with grape harvest

HORT 1101 students with grape harvest


Click thumbnails for larger view.

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From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for food, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

We’ve been exploring the culture, history and chemistry of dye from the plant Indigofera tinctoria, culminating in this week’s lab where students used indigo dye to to create a class banner and turn a piece of clothing into a work of art to take home.

Click on images for larger view.  See indigo art from last year’s class.

Wednesday lab

Wednesday lab

Friday lab

Friday lab

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Dilmun Hill — Cornell’s student-run organic farm — was recently featured in a Cornell Daily Sun video:

It was also the subject of two student videos (here and here) following a visit from the HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems) class:

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From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

This week’s class focused on the the Fabiaceae family. We sampled hummus and “peanuts” from leguminous crops in lecture. The highlight of the week in lecture was the exploration of the art of horticulture with Marcia Eames-Sheavly, and then the culture, history and chemistry of Indigo dying.

The lab for the week kept with the hands-on/take home theme from the entire semester by producing indigo dye from Indigofera tinctoria. Then each student dyed an piece of clothing to take home and contributed to the lab section banner that hangs outside Plant Science 47C.

This artistic endeavor was a perfect ending to a semester exploring the art and science of horticulture.

Teaching assistant Kevin Panke-Buisse with indigo-dyed T-shirt.

Teaching assistant Keven Panke-Buisse with indigo-dyed T-shirt

Preparing to unfurl the banner in Wednesday's lab.

Preparing to unfurl the banner in Wednesday's lab.

Wednesday lab's creations.

Wednesday lab's creations.

Friday lab's creations.

Friday lab's creations.

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From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

Seasonal bouquets, a bonus from Bluegrass Lane clean-up.

Seasonal bouquets, a bonus from Bluegrass Lane clean-up.

This week in class, Neil Matson taught us all about the floriculture industry, and how flowering plants are grown, harvested, processed, marketed and ultimately enjoyed. Cheni Filios, our teaching assistant, also discussed how flower bulbs are used as potted plants, cut flowers and in the landscape.

Planting bulbs at Bluegrass Lane.

Planting bulbs at Bluegrass Lane.

For our hands-on lab experience, we traveled to the Bluegrass Lane Turfgrass and Landscape Research and Education Center, just off campus near the golf course. There, we helped with the fall clean-up. We removed plants from beds where the annual flower trials were conducted by Bill Miller’s Flower Bulb Research Program and cut back the perennials to ensure excellent growth and performance in the spring.

We also split up into groups to plant bulbs for a perennialization trial to evaluate how well the bulbs return over several years.

The weather was ideally crisp and so delightfully bright and sunny that many of the students caught the spirit and created their own bouquets of dried flowers and ornamental grasses.

Cleaning up annual flower trial beds.

Cleaning up annual flower trial beds.

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Top to bottom, potato grading line, Don Halseth reveals potato flaws, and analyzing chips.

Top to bottom, potato grading line, Don Halseth reveals potato flaws, and analyzing chips.

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems). View more HORT 1101 posts.

This week, our HORT 1101 students visited the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y. Farm manager Steve McKay gave us a short overview on the challenges of managing research for faculty in seven departments on more than 55 acres. Later, we hung out in a high tunnel growing organic broccoli and discussed the unique issues of growing and marketing crops in tunnels.

Our lab experience focused on potato grading. Don Halseth, our potato guru in the Department of Horticulture, and his team of Jeff Kelly, Randy MacLaury and Eric Sansted led the students through the grading process. That’s where potatoes are counted, washed, defects removed, and sorted by size. The stduents helped the team process several potato varieties that are part of Professor Halseth’s potato evaluation program that he coordinates for breeders around the country. After we graded the potatoes, we had a short demonstration of how to measure specific gravity to determine percent dry matter. Then it was on to the chipping evaluation.

With about 75 percent of all potatoes in the U.S. grown for processing, understanding the quality of the potato when chipped is criitical. Randy led us through the standard methodology used to create the chips, and then measured light emission through the chips. The higher the sugar content, the browner and less uniform the chip emerges, and this is less desirable to the potato chip makers.

Then we found a salt shaker and ate the fruits of our labor! Yum. Nothing like a freshly made, lightly salted potato chip. My favorite was the purple ones!

Working the line.

Working the line.

Frying chips.

Frying chips.

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Nina Bassuk demonstrates how to install container-grown plants.

Nina Bassuk demonstrates how to install container-grown plants.

From Frank Rossi, who introduces students to plants grown for foods, beverages, fiber, aesthetics and recreation in HORT 1101 (Horticultural Science and Systems).

This week in HORT 1101 (well, last week actually), we had a landscape installation experience with Nina Bassuk (right), professor and head of the Urban Horticulture Institute at Cornell. The two lab groups were assigned sections of front slope of Comstock Hall to clean up existing plants (such as smoke bush, forsythia, juniper), incorporate compost, plant some improved plants from Plantasia Nursery and mulch the area.

With help from Kevin McGraw’s group from Cornell Grounds, we removed old damaged plants and got to explore the troubles and perils of urban soils. (The slope was made from building fill from Comstock Hall construction.) The students learned about new juniper and forsythia varieties and proper planting techniques, such as notching and facing plants.

HORT 1101 class spreads mulch outside Comstock Hall

HORT 1101 class spreads mulch outside Comstock Hall

The class’s legacy will now be on display for years to come beautifying the campus.

HORT 1101 class with job well done.

HORT 1101 class with job well done.

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