Archive for the “Grad program” Category

 

Nina Bassuk

Nina Bassuk

Cornell Chronicle [2015-01-15]:

Nina Bassuk, professor of horticulture; Marie Caudill, professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and Rajit Manohar, professor of electrical and computer engineering, are the newest recipients of Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellowships in recognition of their teaching of undergraduate students. President David Skorton announced the Weiss fellows Jan. 30 at a meeting of the Cornell Board of Trustees.

“Nina, Marie and Rajit exemplify the best that Cornell seeks to offer its students,” Skorton said. “They are enormously talented researchers and academic leaders, who inspire undergraduates through their example and boundless energy as teachers and mentors.” …

Bassuk, who marked her 34th year at Cornell in 2014, is known for her innovative teaching and for having a profound and lasting influence on her students.

Her two-course series Creating the Urban Eden incorporates not only a 300-acre campus as an extended classroom but several resources developed in her research on enhancing the functions of plants and trees in urban ecosystems. These include a textbook, “Trees in the Urban Landscape: Site Assessment, Design and Installation” (2004); a “Plant by Phone” service with her recorded descriptions of trees and plants; and a Campus Tree Identification mobile phone app with information on more than 200 plant species.

Bassuk brings tools, plants and soil samples into the classroom but ensures that much of her students’ learning occurs outdoors, leading them on weekly “plant walks” on campus and joining them in horticultural projects. She has enabled students across the university to understand the natural world and what it takes to be successful environmental stewards, adapting her teaching style to students’ individual needs.

“She helps and challenges students to develop their own methods of learning,” one of Bassuk’s students wrote. “Her time and expertise were invaluable.”

Read the whole article.

Bassuk instructs students before planting.

Bassuk instructs ‘Urban Eden’ students before planting Tower Rd. bioswale, September 2014.

Comments No Comments »

Lindsay Jordan

Lindsay Jordan

Mark you calendar…

Lindsay Jordan (MS ’14) will deliver her Dreer Award seminar detailing her recent adventures exploring cool-season viticulture in New Zealand February 4 at 12:15 p.m. in Plant Science 22.

The Frederick Dreer Award, administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, funds one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture.

See the instructions that spell out the applications procedure. Basically it is quite simple. Submit a written proposal to the Dreer Committee by the deadline (March 2, 2015 in this cycle), which is followed by an informal interview, generally in a week or two. The horticulture faculty receive the recommendation of the Dreer Committee and vote on the nominee.

dreer award poster

Comments No Comments »

Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Thompson receives his award from NEWSS Past President Dwight Lingenfelter

Horticulture PhD student Grant Thompson (Kao-Kniffin Lab) won best graduate student presentation (out of 18 entries) place at the 69th Annual Meeting of the  Northeastern Weed Science Society (NEWSS) January 6 in Williamsburg, Va. Thompson’s talk  was titled “Investigating the effects of Pale Swallowwort (Vincetoxicum rossicum) on soil microbial processes.” Congratulations Grant!

The Scientist: Prof. Bruce Reisch Develops New Grape Varieties [Cornell Daily Sun 2015-01-21] – “If I have a disease resistant, cold hardy grape but it makes terrible wine, nobody would plant it. If I have a disease resistant grape that makes fantastic wine but doesn’t survive the winter, very few people would plant it,” Reisch said. “What is really important is getting the combination of traits into one variety.”

Eye on the next generation: New Ag Station director looking toward the future [Finger Lakes Times 2015-01-19] – When people bite into an apple, slice a tomato or sip a glass of wine, Susan Brown hopes they will remember the local research that may have made it possible.

Hard Cider a Big, But Complex, Opportunity [Lancaster Farming 2015-01-17] – Millennials, the current generation of young adults, are driving the hard cider boom. They are more willing than previous generations to spend money on good food and alcohol, said Ian Merwin, a Cornell University professor emeritus and owner of Black Diamond Farm in Trumansburg, N.Y.

Comments No Comments »

Melissa Kitchen

Melissa Kitchen

 Melissa J. Kitchen, graduate student in Public Garden Leadership, was recently featured in this first-person account in Grower Talks [2014-11-26]:           

Horticulture has always been an important part of my life, but it wasn’t until my mid-20s that I discovered it as a career path. I’m a horticulture transplant. Get it?

I was in dentistry by default, but I always found ways to have some horticulture in my life. I convinced my boss to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Daffodil Days. He made a donation and in return they supplied us with daffodils to hand out to our patients. On my lunch breaks, I would wander the parking lot looking for wildflowers to pick. I would display them on my desk for our patients to admire. After the workday, I took evening classes in floral design through the local community college.

When I was 25, I enrolled in undergraduate studies in Plant Science at Cornell University. I loved the diversity of classes—Plant & Human Well-being, Annual & Perennial Plants, Berry Crops, Plant Function and Growth, Principles of Plant Propagation, Taxonomy of Cultivated Plants, Plant Genetics, Soil Science, Weed Science, Magical Mushrooms & Mischievous Molds, Insect Biology. Who knew that you could go to school and actually learn about the things that you love? It certainly was news to me!

Read the whole article.

Comments No Comments »

Phil Griffiths and melons

  • HORT 4025 (Horticultural Crop Improvement)
  • Spring semester
  • 2 credits
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
  • Instructor: Phillip D. Griffiths
    pdg8@cornell.edu

The class provides insight and exposure to the unique challenges associated with the improvement of horticultural crops and is intended for undergraduate students majoring in Plant Sciences, graduate students in the Graduate Field of Horticulture and those in other disciplines with an interest in horticulture.

Areas covered focus on real-world issues addressing changes in production environments, aesthetics, markets, postharvest quality and consumer demands and how they impact marketable yield.

Horticultural crops have diverse challenges from the development of seedless crops and the selection and propagation of clonal genotypes to high quality expectations, year-round consistency, consumer acceptance and targeting of new controlled environment production.

There are no prerequisites, but prior classes in introductory horticulture and genetics are recommended.

Comments No Comments »

Spencer Lake from above.

Spencer Lake from above.

From Tom Whitlow:

You are cordially invited to attend my Restoration Ecology (HORT 4400) class presentation on Spencer Lake, soon to become Catatonk Creek again after more than 150 years of impoundment.

Restoring Spencer Lake to Catatonk Creek
A 158 Year Legacy

7:00 p.m. Thursday Dec. 4
Community Room, Ecology House
111 Country Club Rd., Ithaca, NY
(Behind African Studies on Triphammer Rd.)
Open to the campus and Ithaca community
For information, contact Tom Whitlow: thw2@cornell.edu

Comments No Comments »

James Keach

James Keach

We have more good news at Cornell University today because my PhD student, James Keach, is the recipient of the $5,000 Proven Winners Innovations in Plant Breeding Scholarship.

James is in the Graduate Field of Plant Breeding and is researching interspecific compatibility and trait introgression between Impatiens species and integrating and understanding the basis for resistance to Impatiens Downy Mildew.

Congratulations James!

Comments No Comments »

plant science signU.S. News and World Report released its rankings of the best university programs on the planet, ranking Cornell #1 in Plant and Animal Science and #3 in Agricultural Sciences.

Read more:

Comments No Comments »

berry class viewing blueberries

From Erica Anderson, MPS candidate, Graduate Field of Horticulture:

Last week, students in the course, ”Berry Crops: Culture and Management” (HORT 4420), taught by Marvin Pritts, visited Grisamore Farms in Locke, N.Y. — one of many field trips they’ve taken this semester. Above, they view a field of blueberry bushes turning brilliant red.

Comments No Comments »

The votes have been tallied. Rachel Hestrin, PhD candidate in the Graduate Field of Crop and Soil Sciences (Johannes Lehmann lab) won ‘Best Poster’ at the School of Integrative Plant Science retreat October 14.

Congratulations Rachel!

Rachel Hestrin

Comments No Comments »