Archive for the “Grad program” Category

Melissa Kitchen

Melissa Kitchen

 Melissa J. Kitchen, graduate student in Public Garden Leadership, was recently featured in this first-person account in Grower Talks [2014-11-26]:           

Horticulture has always been an important part of my life, but it wasn’t until my mid-20s that I discovered it as a career path. I’m a horticulture transplant. Get it?

I was in dentistry by default, but I always found ways to have some horticulture in my life. I convinced my boss to participate in the American Cancer Society’s Daffodil Days. He made a donation and in return they supplied us with daffodils to hand out to our patients. On my lunch breaks, I would wander the parking lot looking for wildflowers to pick. I would display them on my desk for our patients to admire. After the workday, I took evening classes in floral design through the local community college.

When I was 25, I enrolled in undergraduate studies in Plant Science at Cornell University. I loved the diversity of classes—Plant & Human Well-being, Annual & Perennial Plants, Berry Crops, Plant Function and Growth, Principles of Plant Propagation, Taxonomy of Cultivated Plants, Plant Genetics, Soil Science, Weed Science, Magical Mushrooms & Mischievous Molds, Insect Biology. Who knew that you could go to school and actually learn about the things that you love? It certainly was news to me!

Read the whole article.

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Phil Griffiths and melons

  • HORT 4025 (Horticultural Crop Improvement)
  • Spring semester
  • 2 credits
  • Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:25 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
  • Instructor: Phillip D. Griffiths
    pdg8@cornell.edu

The class provides insight and exposure to the unique challenges associated with the improvement of horticultural crops and is intended for undergraduate students majoring in Plant Sciences, graduate students in the Graduate Field of Horticulture and those in other disciplines with an interest in horticulture.

Areas covered focus on real-world issues addressing changes in production environments, aesthetics, markets, postharvest quality and consumer demands and how they impact marketable yield.

Horticultural crops have diverse challenges from the development of seedless crops and the selection and propagation of clonal genotypes to high quality expectations, year-round consistency, consumer acceptance and targeting of new controlled environment production.

There are no prerequisites, but prior classes in introductory horticulture and genetics are recommended.

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Spencer Lake from above.

Spencer Lake from above.

From Tom Whitlow:

You are cordially invited to attend my Restoration Ecology (HORT 4400) class presentation on Spencer Lake, soon to become Catatonk Creek again after more than 150 years of impoundment.

Restoring Spencer Lake to Catatonk Creek
A 158 Year Legacy

7:00 p.m. Thursday Dec. 4
Community Room, Ecology House
111 Country Club Rd., Ithaca, NY
(Behind African Studies on Triphammer Rd.)
Open to the campus and Ithaca community
For information, contact Tom Whitlow: thw2@cornell.edu

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James Keach

James Keach

We have more good news at Cornell University today because my PhD student, James Keach, is the recipient of the $5,000 Proven Winners Innovations in Plant Breeding Scholarship.

James is in the Graduate Field of Plant Breeding and is researching interspecific compatibility and trait introgression between Impatiens species and integrating and understanding the basis for resistance to Impatiens Downy Mildew.

Congratulations James!

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plant science signU.S. News and World Report released its rankings of the best university programs on the planet, ranking Cornell #1 in Plant and Animal Science and #3 in Agricultural Sciences.

Read more:

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berry class viewing blueberries

From Erica Anderson, MPS candidate, Graduate Field of Horticulture:

Last week, students in the course, ”Berry Crops: Culture and Management” (HORT 4420), taught by Marvin Pritts, visited Grisamore Farms in Locke, N.Y. — one of many field trips they’ve taken this semester. Above, they view a field of blueberry bushes turning brilliant red.

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The votes have been tallied. Rachel Hestrin, PhD candidate in the Graduate Field of Crop and Soil Sciences (Johannes Lehmann lab) won ‘Best Poster’ at the School of Integrative Plant Science retreat October 14.

Congratulations Rachel!

Rachel Hestrin

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From Justine Vandenheuvel, associate professor, Horticulture Section:

The HORT 2205 (Grapes to Wines lab class) went to Long Island the weekend of October 4-5 to learn about the growing grape and wine industry there. We visited with Alice Wise, viticulturist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center, Riverhead, N.Y., to learn about her research and extension program. We also had stops at the Shinn Estate Vineyards, and Channing Daughters Winery (co-owned and managed by Cornell alum Larry Perrine).

Larry Perrine guides student Anne Repka in the art and science of a "punch-down" on Lemberger.

Larry Perrine guides student Anne Repka in the art and science of a “punch-down” on Lemberger.

 

Barbara Shinn and David Paige (right) talk with students at a Shinn Estate Vineyards.

Barbara Shinn and David Paige (right) talk with students at Shinn Estate Vineyards.

 

Alice Wise (second from left) takes the class on a tour of her viticulture research at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center. (Camila Tahim photo.)

Alice Wise (second from left) takes the class on a tour of her viticulture research at the Long Island Horticultural Research & Extension Center. (Camila Tahim photo.)

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Miles with Aloidendron dichotoma

Miles with Aloidendron dichotoma

From Dreer Award recipient Miles Schwartz-Sax (MPS ’14) who is studying Plant Conservation in South Africa:

Hope you are doing well and that the semester has started off smoothly. So far South Africa has been an exciting experience. I have had adventures botanizing in the mountains, high deserts, ocean sides, natural areas and already visited a handful of private and public gardens. At Stellenbosch Botanical Garden, I have been busy helping mainly in the curatorial aspects of the garden, so plant identification, labeling, propagation, database management and development and so on.The state of urban horticulture is almost non existent in South Africa, so it has been very interesting to see the creative approaches people are implementing. The city of Stellenbosch is known for its extensive oak plantings throughout the city that go back to the city’s development. The city is currently undertaking a Million Tree campaign and I have been able to sit in on a few of these events to get a sense of how they are planning to go about the project.

Mostly the soils are sandy in this area, so some street tree plantings can obviously deal with the high bulk density. But it would seem they would benefit from the development or implementation of skeletal structural or Amsterdam structural soils.  Martin Smit the curator here is trying to get me in contact with a few municipal folks to see if we can’t set up a seminar or talk to some key folks on soil quality, street tree planting, site prep. We will see how this develops. Things have there own way of working  down here compared to fully developed nations.

As a means of reporting on my activities over here I have developed a blog that you can follow: Dreer South Africa. Hopefully this will work as my way of keeping folks updated on my activities.

All my best and hope you are enjoy the start of fall colors and the bounty of the apple harvest.

See the application and instructions for the 2015 Dreer Award cycle. Deadline is March 2, 2015 .

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Lindsay Jordan

2013 Dreer Award Winner Lindsay Jordan explored cool-season viticulture in New Zealand

From Nina Bassuk:

The Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science offers a wonderful opportunity once a year, the Frederick Dreer Award, that allows one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture.

See the application and instructions that spells out the procedure for applying. Basically it is quite simple. Submit a written proposal to the Dreer Committee by the deadline (March 2, 2015 in this cycle), which is followed by an informal interview, generally in a week or two. The faculty receives the recommendation of the Dreer Committee and votes on the nominee.

The only obligation of the Dreer award winner is to write to the Dreer Committee monthly while overseas, and upon return to the United States, give a presentation about their time abroad to students and faculty.

Please look into this opportunity seriously. It can be taken as a summer and a semester’s leave or a year’s leave of absence during school or upon graduation. If you would like to talk over a potential idea for the Dreer with a member of the Committee (and we encourage you to do so), please contact Nina Bassuk (Horticulture) Josh Cerra (Landscape Architecture) or Marvin Pritts. (Horticulture).

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