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Events

Seminar: Building Better Grapevines with Peter Cousins

Peter Cousins

Peter Cousins

Building Better Grapevines

A public seminar by Dr. Peter Cousins
Grape breeder, E. & J. Gallo Winery (formerly Grape Breeder and Geneticist, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Geneva, N.Y.)

August 31, 5 p.m.
Stocking Hall 146

Sponsored by the Cornell Viticulture & Enology Program

More information: Dr. Justine Vanden Heuvel, jev32@cornell.edu

Dreer Seminar Sept. 2: Urban Agriculture and Aquaponics in Switzerland

Urban Agriculture and Aquaponics in Switzerland
September 2, 12:15 p.m.
22 Plant Science Building

A Seminar by 2014 Dreer Award recipient Brett Morgan

The Frederick Dreer Award, administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, offers a wonderful opportunity for one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture. The application deadline for the current cycle has passed. But you can view the application and instructions to start planning ahead for the 2016 award. (Application deadline tentatively late Feb./early March 2016.)

click for printable poster

120+ attend Floriculture Field Day

Alan Armitage, University of Georgia emeritus professor and best-selling author, points out overwintered pineapple lilies (Eucomis spp.) at Bluegrass Lane.

Alan Armitage, University of Georgia emeritus professor and best-selling author, points out overwintered pineapple lilies (Eucomis spp.) at Bluegrass Lane.

More than 120 greenhouse growers and retailers, florists, educators and others from around New York and the Northeast attended the annual Cornell Floriculture Field Day August 11. The day included morning presentations on campus followed by afternoon tours of flower trials at the Bluegrass Lane Turf and Landscape Research Facility and cutflower and high tunnel research at Maple Avenue.

After a warm welcome from Kathryn Boor, Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, attendees were treated by a talk on What’s trending in annuals, perennials and edibles by Alan Armitage, emeritus professor at the University of Georgia and best-selling author. Armitage also demonstrated his new Greatest Perennials and Annuals app for the group.  They also heard from Cornell plant pathologist Margery Daugherty on greenhouse diseases, Cornell horticulture professor Chris Wien on high tunnel cut flower production, and Peter Konjoian, Konjoian’s Floriculture Education Services, on making the switch to greenhouse vegetables from ornamentals.

Donald Horowitz '77, Wittendale's Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the new Edibles Division in the 2015 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. He also finished first in the Hanging Basket Division and third in the Open Division.

Donald Horowitz ’77, Wittendale’s Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the new Edibles Division in the 2015 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. He also finished first in the Hanging Basket Division and third in the Open Division.

In the afternoon at Bluegrass Lane, attendees got hands-on experience diagnosing pests and diseases, toured favorite perennials, and viewed trials of annual flowers and container growing media and demonstrations of containers combining edibles and ornamentals.

The afternoon also featured the announcement of the winners of the twelfth annual Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. Pufahl, who founded Beds and Borders, Inc., Laurel, N.Y., was a staple on the horticultural educational seminar circuit, spreading her container ideas far and wide. It is her vision that changed the way the horticulture industry looks at the spring container business. Her influence brought back a bit of the art and beauty to the business. All proceeds from the contest — which has topped $10,000 since its inception — go directly to IBD research at Mt. Sinai Hospital, to help ensure a bright future for Kathy’s daughter and others like her, who have Crohn’s disease. For more information about the competition, contact: Karen Hall nysfi.org@gmail.com.

Horticulture chair Steve Reiners welcomes field day attendees to Bluegrass Lane.

Horticulture chair Steve Reiners welcomes field day attendees to Bluegrass Lane.

Attendees view demonstration of mixed vegetable/ornamental container plantings. "For many, the garden of the future will be on their deck," Armitage told the group.

Attendees view demonstration of mixed vegetable/ornamental container plantings. “For many, the garden of the future will be on their deck,” Armitage told the group.

Plant pathologist Margery Daugherty and entomologist John Sanderson help attendees identify insect pests and diseases on perennials at Bluegrass Lane.

Plant pathologist Margery Daugherty and entomologist John Sanderson help attendees identify insect pests and diseases on perennials at Bluegrass Lane.

Horticulture professor Chris Wien explains his cut flower research at the Maple Avenue research facility.

Horticulture professor Chris Wien explains his cut flower research at the Maple Avenue research facility.

Soil Health ‘Train-the-Trainer’ Workshop

More than 50 government agency staff, conservationists, researchers, and students from around the world flocked to campus for the four-day Cornell Soil Health ‘Train-the-Trainer’ Workshop August 5 to 8.

Attendees heard from a line-up of speakers on the latest in soil health testing and management, participated in hands-on workshops, put together mangaement plans, and visited Cornell’s Musgrave Research Farm in Aurora for field work and demonstrations.

For more information about the Cornell Soil Health program, visit the Cornell Soil Health website.

Horticulture graduate student Miles Schwartz Sax (right) and attendees examine healthy urban soil from a planting outside Mann Library that was certified by the Sustainable Sites Initiative, the equivalent of LEED certification for landscapes.

Horticulture graduate student Miles Schwartz Sax (right) and attendees examine healthy urban soil from a planting outside Mann Library that was certified by the Sustainable Sites Initiative, the equivalent of LEED certification for landscapes.

Camp Mushroom cultivates new growers

Reposted from CALS Notes

There is a camp for just about everything, including mushrooms.

Even though it’s been offered for nearly a decade, Camp Mushroom consistently sells out. To satisfy the waitlist from the April workshop, a one-day workshop was held on June 7 at MacDaniels Nut Grove, Cornell’s forest farming and agroforestry research center located east of the Cornell Orchards.

“Mushroom growing has increased quite rapidly,” said instructor Steve Gabriel, the Cornell Cooperative Extension agroforestry specialist. He is also the co-founder of the Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute and a mushroom grower on Wellspring Forest Farm, which he runs with his wife Elizabeth.

Read more.

Visit the Cornell Mushroom Cultivation website.

Steve Gabriel

Agroforestry specialist Steve Gabriel

Turf field day at Bluegrass Lane

More than 40 golf course superintendents and other turf professionals spent the morning on Thursday learning about the latest turfgrass research taking place at the Bluegrass Lane Turf and Landscape Research Facility adjacent to the Robert Trent Jones golf course northeast of campus.

Among the highlights:

Horticulture graduate student Grant Thompson explains his research using 13C carbon dioxide to label grasses, which he will clip and return to lawns to study the fate of carbon in different urban soils.

Grant Thompson explains researuc

Associate professor Frank Rossi explains how overseeding overused athletic fields can help maintain safe playing conditions.

Rossi explains overseeding

Rossi discusses a new collaboration with Consumer Reports to evaluate robotic lawn mowers.

Rossi and robotic mower

Robotic mowers at work:

Commencement pictures

Last Sunday, Carol Grove attended her last commencement breakfast and ceremony as Graduate Field Assistant. (She retires June 5.) As usual, she took some great pictures.

Do you have pictures to share? Send a link to your album to cdc25@cornell.edu.

Bill Borgstede MPS '15 and his advisor and associate professor in the Horticulture Section Frank Rossi.

Bill Borgstede MPS ’15 and his advisor and associate professor in the Horticulture Section Frank Rossi.

Weekend wildflower walk

From Marvin Pritts, Horticulture Section chair:

Eighteen intrepid hikers headed off to Thatcher’s Pinnacles in the Danby State Forest on Sunday to see an incredible view and many wildflowers and uncommon trees. Along the trail we observed American chestnut and chestnut oak, along with pink lady’s slipper in full bloom, Trillium grandiflorum, Canada mayflower, Gnaphalium obtusifolium, starflower, Polygala, geranium, Uvularia, and many more.

weekend wildflower walkers

Horticulture Outreach Day and Hortus Forum final sale May 8

Poppy cyanotype

Poppy cyanotype

Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, will have its final plant sale of the school year on Friday, May 8, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Hortus Forum greenhouse at the Kenneth Post Lab greenhouse complex on Tower Rd. (Directions.)

The students will be selling their usual selection of tropicals and succulents, plus pitcher plants, air plants, ferns, ivy topiaries, and lots of spring bulbs (tulips, hyacinths, and daffodils).

And as long as you’re in the area, be sure to check out SoHo’s Horticulture Outreach Day activities …

From Jeffrey Beem-Miller, Society of Horticulture for Graduate Students (SoHo):

Our planned Horticulture Outreach Day that was postponed because of rain and cold weather has been rescheduled:

Friday, May 8, 1 to 3 p.m. in the Horton classroom at Kenneth Post Lab.

Come learn about plant propagation, make beautiful artwork with plant materials (cyanotypes, right), create soil painting and compete with the bees for prizes in a game of pollination at the annual Horticultural Outreach Day.

hort outreach day flower

 

Dilmun Hill Field Day May 9

field day flyer

Come join us at Dilmun Hill Student Farm for a day of sun and fun!

Festivities include:

1pm – 3pm: Farming – get your hands dirty building beds, sow and plant. Wear closed-toe shoes.

3pm – 5pm: Fun and Food

  • Plant your own seeds
  • Create seed-filled Mother’s Day Cards
  • Make seed bombs
  • Music
  • Food

Directions.