Skip to main content

Events

Tour the Galapagos with Mark Bridgen

Mark Bridgen

Mark Bridgen

Mark Bridgen, Horticulture Section professor and director of the Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center, will lead an eco tour and natural history workshop to the Galapagos Islands June 1 – 12, 2017.

Participants will spend a full 11 days/10 nights aboard the Tip Top IV yacht visiting all of the significant outer islands, allowing for maximum wildlife observations. Each day the yacht travels to a different island during the night while people are sleeping. Then, early in the morning, the small group will go ashore to observe and photograph the unique wildlife — the same types of plants and animals that led Darwin to his Theory of Evolution when he visited in 1835.

Every day is different as the group voyages around the archipelago, and every excursion offers new opportunities to experience the natural wonders of the Galápagos. The days are filled with early-morning and late-afternoon outings to catch the peak animal activity, including land iguanas, sea lions, giant tortoises, and countless types of unique birds. There are also one or two snorkeling sessions during the days to observe the coral reefs, sea lions, Galápagos penguins, marine iguanas, sea turtles, hundreds of fish, and much more. There will be the opportunity to kayak several of the days and the evenings are devoted to natural history lectures and stargazing.

More information.

Kao-Kniffin kicks of Horticulture seminar series Monday 8/29

Kao-Kniffin

Kao-Kniffin

Jenny Kao-Kniffin, assistant professor in the Horticulture Section, kicks off the Fall 2016 Horticulture Section Seminar Series on Monday, August 29, 2016 at 12:20 p.m. in 404 Plant Science Building.

She will speak on Modifying plant-biotic interactions in rhizospheres for novel weed management approaches.

This and other Horticulture Section seminars are also available via videoconference to A134 Barton in Geneva. View the full fall line-up for the seminar series.

Most seminars are also recorded and available online on the Horticulture Section seminar YouTube playlist.

 

 

30+ attend Cornell Kale Day

Griffiths introduces Kale Day participants to his breeding research trials.

Griffiths introduces Kale Day participants to his breeding research trials.

More than 30 seed growers, researchers, food industry representatives, consumers and others attended the first Cornell Kale Day at the Homer C. Thompson Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y. August 23.

Phillip Griffiths, associate professor in the Horticulture Section, welcomed the group  by pointing out the rapid growth in kale’s popularity, but also cautioning that it takes time to develop new varieties with superior agronomic traits and consumer appeal.

Griffiths’ efforts to breed new leafy brassicas began in 2008 with a focus on African kale (sukuma wiki). This effort expanded with support from the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, incorporating diverse genetic material from collections maintaining biodiversity.

Participants spent most of the afternoon touring Griffiths’ breeding research, including plots featuring currently available varieties and breeding lines in various stages of refinement. To get feedback from the group, participants were asked to flag their favorite varieties. The feedback will help guide decisions for what hybrids will be used in on-farm trials next summer funded by  the New York Farm Viability Institute (NYFVI), says horticulture graduate student Hannah Swegarden, who works with Griffiths.

One of the hybrids in development .

One of the hybrids in development . (Photo: Matt Hayes)

 

 

Horticulture Graduate Field Review

Faculty, graduate students and staff associated with the Graduate Field of Horticulture held their biannual Field of Horticulture Graduate Student Reviews and Field Meeting August 19 in Jordan Hall at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES), Geneva, N.Y.

Seventeen students and three faculty gave 2-minute/2-slide flash presentations about their research progress, in addition to two longer talks. During breaks, students presented posters providing more details about their work.

Horticulture chair Steve Reiners used the occasion to present NYSAES director Susan Brown with the Wilder Award from the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) recognizing the contributions of her apple breeding work to advancements in pomology.

Graduate Field of Horticulture, August 19, 2016.

Graduate Field of Horticulture, August 19, 2016.

An engaging poster session.

An engaging poster session.

Susan Brown (right) shows her Wilder Award medal to Hannah Swegarden, president of the Society of Horticulture for Graduate Students (SoHo).

Susan Brown (right) shows her Wilder Award medal to Hannah Swegarden, president of the Society of Horticulture for Graduate Students (SoHo).

50+ attend reduced tillage field day

More than 50 growers, educators and others attended the Reduced Tillage in Organic Vegetables Field Day at Cornell’s Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y. August 17.

The hay wagon tour include stops on the NOFA-NY certified organic portion of the Thompson Farm to view research on reduced tillage practices on permanent beds, a strip tillage demonstration, and talks on pests, organic soil amendments and soil health.

The farm is managed by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station. The event was co-sponsored by NOFA-NY.

Research technician Ryan Maher explains his trial evaluating reduced tillage practices on permanent beds.

Research technician Ryan Maher explains his trial evaluating reduced tillage practices on permanent beds.

Christy Hoepting, Extension vegetable specialist for the Cornell Vegetable Program, discusses organic management of Swede midge, a growing pest problem in brassica crops.

Christy Hoepting, Extension vegetable specialist for the Cornell Vegetable Program, discusses organic management of Swede midge, a growing pest problem in brassica crops.

Anusuya Rangarajan, director of the Cornell Small Farms Program, explains features of strip tillage equipment used to limit soil disturbance to the area around the row and break up hardpans that limit rooting.

Anusuya Rangarajan, director of the Cornell Small Farms Program, explains features of strip tillage equipment used to limit soil disturbance to the area around the row and break up hardpans that limit rooting.

Attendees await strip tillage demo.

Attendees await strip tillage demo.

 

USDA apple, grape and tart cherry collection tour Sept. 17

apple and grape cultivarsFrom C. Thomas Chao, horticulturist and curator for the national clonal germplasm collections of apples, cold-hardy grapes, and tart cherries of the Plant Genetic Resources Unit, USDA-ARS at Geneva, NY.:

Mark your calendar…

On September 17,  the Clonal Collection of Plant Genetic Resources Unit, USDA-ARS, Geneva, NY will host its annual open house from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the McCarthy Farm, 2865 County Road 6 (Preemption Road), Geneva, NY, 14456 (across from St. Mary’s Cemetery).

There will be a two hour walking tour on uneven ground through the orchard and vineyard to view the collection — about 10 minutes about the overall collection, 10 minutes about the tart cherry collection, 70 minutes about the apple collection, and 30 minutes about the grape collection.

f there is any question, please contact me at c.thomas.chao@ars.usda.gov or at 315-787-2454.

We will see you rain or shine on 9/17/2016.

100 attend Floriculture Field Day

More than 100 greenhouse growers and retailers, florists, educators and others from around New York and the Northeast attended the annual Cornell Floriculture Field Day August 9.

The morning program at Stocking Hall featured presentations including (click links for video):

Attendees also applauded entomology professor John Sanderson who was awarded an Excellence in IPM award from the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program (NYS IPM). In his 25 years at Cornell, Sanderson has enthusiastically helped greenhouse growers identify pest problems, reduce pesticide use and increase profits.

The afternoon program at the Bluegrass Lane Turf and Landscape Research Facility featured tours of annual flower trials, mixed container plantings of vegetables, herbs and flowers, pollinator-friendly plants, alternatives to invasive plants and more. Attendees also applauded winners of the 13th annual Kathy Pufahl Container Competition, which since 2003 has raised more than $10,000 for IBD research at Mt. Sinai Hospital. View 2016 winners.

bed0736x640Attendees view annual flower trials.

pollinator-plants0723x640Betsy Lamb (with clipboard), New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, leads pollinator-friendly plant walkabout.

pollinator-plants0703x640Lamb (right) and attendees observe pollinators swarming on Veronicastrum virginicum (Culver’s root).

pollinator-bed0745x640Sue and Mark Adams, of Mark Adams Greenhouses, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., who sponsored this pollinator plant bed, pose with research technician Kendra Hutchins, who manages the annual flower trials.

pollinator0674x640Bee visiting blooms in the pollinator bed.

containers0685x640Cheni Filios (MS ’14), Vegetable Product Line Manager, PanAmerican Seed Company at Ball Horticultural, explains strategies for mixing vegetables, herbs and flowers in containers.

Donald Horowitz ’77 (Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture), Wittendale’s Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the new Edibles Division in the 2015 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition.Donald Horowitz ’77 (Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture), Wittendale’s Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the Edibles Division in the 2016 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. He fashioned the planter from a container used to ship pots to his business. View other winners.

bed0639x640Getting a closer look at the annual trials.

Farm-to-Table on a City Roof

Left to right: Yoshi Harada, PhD Candidate, Graduate Field of Horticulture, Cornell University; Ben Flanner, President & Director of Agriculture, Brooklyn Grange; Thomas Whitlow, Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, Cornell University. (Photo: Diane Bonderaff Photography)

Left to right: Yoshi Harada, PhD Candidate, Graduate Field of Horticulture, Cornell University; Ben Flanner, President & Director of Agriculture, Brooklyn Grange; Thomas Whitlow, Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, Cornell University. (Photo: Diane Bonderaff Photography)

By Sheri Englund via Atkinson Center Blog [2016-07-21]:

The skyline view from Brooklyn Grange’s rooftop is delectable, but fresh organic produce from the organization’s one-acre rooftop Flagship Farm is even more delicious.

Director David Lodge and ACSF faculty fellows joined with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences on June 29 for a farm-to-table dinner showcasing Cornell’s work on local food systems and sustainable agriculture. More than 50 Cornell alumni and friends toured the facility and learned about Brooklyn Grange’s successful model for urban farming and collaborations with Cornell researchers.

Brooklyn Grange grows more than 50,000 pounds of organic produce each year at the world’s largest rooftop soil farms, located on two roofs in New York City, and distributes the vegetables and herbs to local restaurants, CSA members, and the public. Since its founding in 2010, the organization has become the United States’ leading green roofing business, providing urban farming and green roof consulting and installation to clients worldwide.

Brooklyn Grange operates at the intersection of sustainable agriculture, economic and environmental sustainability, and urban resiliency—all top research concerns for the Atkinson Center. After dinner, plant ecologist Thomas Whitlow gave a presentation about engaging communities in urban horticulture. Sustainable communities expert Katherine McComas closed the evening. She remarked:

“Tonight provided a taste of the innovative and impactful partnerships that are transforming the world around us in profound ways—the partnership that here, tonight, has helped to create new spaces for food, agriculture, sustainability, education, and community development right in the center of our most urban environments.”

View more pictures at CALS Notes.

Climate, Weather, Data: Protecting Our Crops and Landscapes conference Aug. 15

conference poster

Click image to download poster (.pdf)

NYS IPM Climate Conference:

Climate, Weather, Data: Protecting Our Crops and Landscapes
August 15, 2016, 9:00 – 4:15
Cornell Cooperative Extension Albany County, Voorheesville, NY

With all the talk about climate change you might be wondering how it will affect food production, pests, and even landscapes  – and what you can do about it. The Second Annual NYS Integrated Pest Management conference can help!  Climate, Weather, Data:  Protecting Our Crops and Landscapes will be held August 15, 2016 at the Cornell Cooperative Extension Office in Voorheesville, NY.

A wide variety of speakers from New York State and the Northeast will provide background information on the current state of knowledge on climate change and changes in our weather patterns, and how collecting climate and weather data can help us predict and manage pests.

Mike Hoffmann and Allison Chatrchyan from the Cornell Institute for Climate Change and Agriculture will discuss what you can do about climate change, and the Climate Smart Farming Program.   Jerry Brotzge will explain the NYS Mesonet. Juliet Carroll from NYS Integrated Pest Management will cover the tools for growers in the Network for Environment and Weather Applications system.  David Hollinger will present resources from the Northeast Regional Climate Hub.

Open discussion sessions are included so you can ask your own questions.  The final agenda will be available soon, so stay tuned!

We are honored that Richard Ball, the Commissioner of the  NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, will kick off the conference with opening remarks

The program will run from 9:00-4:15 and costs $45 – which includes lunch, and breaks.

Registration information, a map, and the draft agenda can be found at the Climate, Weather, Data website

If you have questions, please contact Amanda Grace at arw245@cornell.edu or 315 787-2208.

Register now for Cornell Fruit Field Day, July 20, Geneva, N.Y.

Pre-registration deadline is July 15 @ noon. Walk-in registrations will not be available, you must pre-register. Register now.

fruit compositeRepost from June 24. From Art Agnello, Dept. of Entomology, NYSAES:

Mark your calendars for the Cornell Fruit Field Day, to be held in Geneva on Wednesday, July 20.  The 2016 version of this triennial event will feature ongoing research in berries, hops, grapes, and tree fruit, and is being organized by Cornell University, the NYS Agricultural Experiment Station, CALS Fruit Program Work Team and Cornell Cooperative Extension.  All interested persons are invited to learn about the fruit research under way at Cornell University.  Attendees will be able to select from tours of different fruit commodities.  Details of the program presentations are still being finalized, but the event will feature a number of topics, including:

 Berries

  • Spotted wing drosophila research update in berry crops
  • Hummingbird use, monitoring network
  • Use of exclusion netting for managing spotted wing drosophila in fall raspberries
  • Monitoring spotted wing drosophila for management decisions in summer raspberry and blueberry
  • Behavioral control of spotted wing drosophila using repellents and attract & kill stations
  • Effect of habitat diversity on ecosystem services for strawberries
  • High tunnel production of black and red raspberries
  • Day-neutral strawberries/low tunnel production

 Tree Fruits

  • Apple breeding and genetic studies
  • Research updates on fire blight, apple scab, mildew
  • Bitter pit in Honeycrisp
  • 3D camera canopy imaging
  • Ambrosia beetle management trials
  • Malus selections for potential use in cider production
  • Precision spraying in orchards
  • Role of insects in spreading fire blight in apples
  • Bacterial canker of sweet cherries
  • Rootstocks & training systems for sweet cherry
  • NC-140 rootstock trials on Honeycrisp and Snap Dragon
  • Pear rootstocks & training systems

 Grapes & Hops

  • Sour rot of grapes
  • VitisGen grape breeding project
  • Precision spraying in grapes
  • Managing the spread of leafroll virus in Vinifera grape using insecticides and vine removal
  • Early leaf removal on Riesling
  • Overview of NYSAES hops planting
  • Powdery and downy mildew management in hops
  • Hops weed mgt; mite biocontrol
  • Update on malting barley research

 Also

  • FSMA Produce Safety Rule

Field Day details

The event will take place at the NYSAES Fruit and Vegetable Research Farm South, 1097 County Road No. 4, 1 mile west of Pre-emption Rd. in Geneva, NY.

Arrive at 8:00 AM to get settled in. Tours begin promptly at 8:30 AM and are scheduled in the morning from 8:30 to 11:30 and in the afternoon from 1:30 to 5:00. Lunch will be served at the exhibit tent area between 11:30-12:30.

Visit sponsors anytime from 11:30-1:30

Learn about products and services from:

  • Agro Liquid
  • Arysta Life Science
  • Dow AgroSciences
  • Dupont
  • Farm Credit East, ACA
  • Finger Lakes Trellis Supply
  • LaGasse Works, Inc.
  • Lakeview Vineyard Equipment
  • NY Apple Sales
  • OESCO, Inc
  • Red Jacket Orchards
  • Superior Wind Machine Service
  • Valent USA Corp.
  • Wafler Farms
  • Tastings from War Horse Brewing

To participate as a sponsor, see the registration website or contact Shelly Cowles (315-787-2274; mw69@cornell.edu).

Register now!

Admission fee is $50/person ($40 for additional attendees from the same farm or business), which covers tours, lunch and educational materials. Pre-registration is required. Walk-in registration may be available for a $10 surcharge on the day of the event.  Register on the Cornell Fruit Field Day Event registration page, http://events.cals.cornell.edu/ffd2016

Skip to toolbar