Archive for the “Events” Category

chili_cookoffFrom horticulture grad student Adam Karl:

The School of Integrative Plant Science Chili Cook-Off will be held in Emerson 135 on Thursday, March 19th from 4:00 to 6:30 p.m. The Sections of Crop and Soil Science, Horticulture, Plant Biology, Plant Breeding, and Plant Pathology should assemble their best chili chefs in three categories:

  1. Meat
  2. Vegetarian
  3. Wild Card (non-traditional chilis)

Students, Faculty, and Staff are all welcome to participate! To enter the contest, email chili entries to Adam Karl (adk83@cornell.edu).

Please include the following info:

  • names of cooks
  • section
  • category
  • name of chili

Registration deadline is Friday, March 13. We only have room for 20 chili entrants – so don’t delay registering!

There will be prizes for the winner of each chili category.

We look forward to sampling some chili with you!

 The Chili Cook-Off Team

Comments No Comments »

Hort 4940 students with bananas.Mark your calendar:

UnBelizeable!

A botanical exploration through the Toledo District of southern Belize

Monday, March 2, at 4:30, in Rm. 404 Plant Science Building.

Join Hort 4940: Tropical Plants Extravaganza students as they offer a lively presentation about their January 2015 excursion through the Toledo District of southern Belize.

Intensively experiential, with forays which include explorations into forests, a national park, and cacao plantation, the students will offer insights into their thinking about a sustainable future, and conclude their presentation with a hands-on cacao experience.

Hot chocolate and light foods will be served.

Comments No Comments »

Peter Davies, professor, Plant Biology and Horticulture Sections, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, will kick off the Spring 2015 Horticulture Section seminar series February 2 with a talk on Senescence of the whole plant: a look back and a look forward.

This semester’s seminar series will feature wide-ranging topics from lawns and farm labor to historic gardens and shrub willow breeding.

Horticulture seminars are free and open to all and meet 12:20 to 1:10 p.m. most Mondays when classes are in session in Plant Science Room 404 and via Polycom to Geneva in A134 Barton Hall. (Refreshments served.) Those wishing to take for 1 credit, enroll in HORT 4950 (undergrads) or HORT 6000 (grads).

In additions, there will be two SIPS-wide seminars this spring: Ed Buckler, USDA-ARS plant geneticist on January 28 and Giles Oldroyd, John Innes Centre, Norwich UK on April 15.

More information:

spring-2015-hort-seminar-series

Comments No Comments »

 

Via CALS Notes:

On Nov. 10, Dean Kathryn Boor, Cornell Cooperative Extension Director and Associate Dean Chris Watkins, and more than 100 guests celebrated the College of Agriculture and Life Science’s best and brightest at the 11th annual Research, Extension and Staff Awards.

Part of the program was dedicated to the Core Value Staff Awards, created in 2010 and designed to recognize individuals or teams who have gone far beyond the standards defined by Cornell’s Skills for Success.

“These awards go to staff who consistently go above and beyond the call in their day-to-day activities,” Boor said, “and we are happy to highlight their dedication and accomplishments.”

This year the dean presented two awards for Unsung Hero. The award recognizes a team player whose accomplishments extend beyond the guidelines of a specific category.

 

 Dean Kathryn Boor presents 'Unsung Hero' award to Craig Cramer November 10.


Dean Kathryn Boor presents ‘Unsung Hero’ award to Craig Cramer November 10.

The first Unsung Hero Award was presented to Craig Cramer, an extension communication specialist in the Horticulture section in the School of Integrative Plant Science.

Cramer is a key point person for the communications needs of the new school. He works closely with CALS Communications to help cover events and accomplishments by faculty, students and staff. He keeps websites updated and evolving, writes blog posts and articles, partners with CALS Communications for press releases, and is an excellent photographer and videographer. He is often found visiting classes or attending field days, conferences, and other events to capture Horticulture’s exciting work in action.

In short, he does whatever it takes to get the word out about Plant Science’s exciting research, teaching and extension.

Dean Boor also noted that each year, Cramer learns new skills and takes on more responsibilities, even regularly offering seminars to students and extension educators on topics like “writing for the Internet” and “creating digital art.” Masterful at presenting information in an engaging way, he enthusiastically accepts new communications challenges, such as helping a class produce posters that advertise the quantifiable value of trees to our community or editing the “Cornell Guide for Growing Fruit at Home,” which won an award for best new publication.

 

Dean Kathryn Boor presents 'Unsung Hero' award to Steven McKay November 10.

Dean Kathryn Boor presents ‘Unsung Hero’ award to Steven McKay November 10.

The second Unsung Hero Award was presented to Steven McKay, farm manager at the Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y.

McKay’s technical role is to support the activities of 20-25 faculty researchers from more than a half a dozen departments who are investigating diverse questions associated with vegetables in New York. He oversees 260 acres of farmland, managing all aspects of land preparation, pest management, staff assignments and equipment purchases.

However, Boor said, his impact and reputation have expanded well beyond a support role.

He works long hours and is available 24/7, sharing his expertise with faculty and graduate students to help maximize the impact of their results. Field experiments are, by their nature, at the mercy of the elements, but Steve cares so deeply about on-farm experiments that he routinely goes beyond expectations to ensure their success.

For example, during Tropical Storm Lee, severe flooding jeopardized field trials at the farm. Due to the mud, it was impossible to use a tractor to apply fungicide treatments to one of the experiments, so Steve trudged through the mucky fields with a backpack sprayer to save the day.

During a time when sustainability and efficiency are key, he is a true forward-thinking leader. He has transitioned much of the farm to drip irrigation to reduce water usage by 80 percent, and he shuttered the Thompson lab building to save thousands of dollars annually on heating and utility costs.

The dean said his curiosity, creativity and ingenuity benefit everyone who depends on the farm – he is a lifelong learner who is always seeking new and improved practices. She noted that McKay even challenged an engineering class with a contest to design improved drainage and irrigation systems, and then implemented the winning design at the farm.

Comments No Comments »

From Thomas Björkman:

Hundreds of Cornell alumni gathered at the Astor Center in Greenwich Village for Furrows to Boroughs: A Taste of New York State in New York City, a regional sesquicentennial celebration October 22 hosted by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.  The event highlighted the link between tri-state agriculture and Cornell. The culinary work and products of local farmers, agricultural businesses and chefs were on display and available to taste.

Horticultural products featured prominently. Many wines of course, a tremendous pastry designed around Susan Brown’s new SnapDragon apple, and fall berries and vegetables raised with techniques and varieties developed at Cornell. The alumni were not only excited by the great food, but also proud to be part of the institution that helps make it all possible.

I collaborated with chef and native Ithacan Tyler Kord, who has been making a big splash in the New York City restaurant scene by highlighting broccoli in new contexts. He operates the No. 7 restaurant in Fort Greene Brooklyn and has two high-profile sub shops at the Plaza Hotel by Central Park and the Ace Hotel in the financial district where he has popularized both the broccoli sub sandwich and the broccoli taco. This year Short Stack published his cookbook  Broccoli.

At Furrows to Boroughs, Tyler served tacos using broccoli provided by Windflower Farm, operated by former Cornell Cooperative Extension educator Ted Blomgren, who continues to be an avid cooperator on Cornell Horticulture research and extension projects as well as a pioneer for providing fresh produce to the food deserts in the outer boroughs through an active CSA.

As part of the Eastern Broccoli Project, I’m leading a team to develop varieties as well as the production and marketing infrastructure to supply New York City with Northeast broccoli for three months of the year, and have other Eastern regions supply the same buyers for the balance of the year.

Our goal is not to supply all of the Big Apple’s broccoli, but enough to provide regional growers with a profitable alternative enterprise and consumers with a fresher, more flavorful and nutritious product.

The project is funded by the USDA’s  Specialty Crop Research Initiative, and is a collaboration with six other universities, the Agricultural Research Service, seed companies,  distributors and growers.

Tyler Kord prepares broccoli tacos at Furrows to Boroughs.

Tyler Kord prepares broccoli tacos at Furrows to Boroughs.

Comments No Comments »

Graduate students Silene DeCiucies and Rachel Hestrin and Soil Health Lab Coordinator Bob Schindelbeck will help you celebrate World Soil Day in the Mann Library lobby.

Graduate students Silene DeCiucies and Rachel Hestrin and Soil Health Lab Coordinator Bob Schindelbeck will help you celebrate World Soil Day in the Mann Library lobby.

Today is  World Soil Day, so desginated by the International Union of Soil Sciences, the FAO, and the UN General Assembly.

Come to the Mann Library lobby to celebrate the importance of soil as a critical component of the natural system and as a vital contributor to human well-being.

The Crop and Soil Sciences Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science invites faculty, staff and students to drop by from 9 a.m. to – 5 p.m. to view posters, hands-on displays and video clips.

And don’t miss Soil Health Lab Coordinator Bob Schindelbeck’s gummy-worm brownies, while supplies last.

Comments No Comments »

Permaculture systems meet humans needs while restoring ecosystem health.

Permaculture systems meet humans needs while restoring ecosystem health.

From Lori Brewer:

Registration is now open for the online course Permaculture Design: Ecosystem Mimicry, offered Jan. 5 through Feb. 19., 2015 through the Horticulture section’s distance learning program. Space is limited to 25 participants. Registration closes when limit is reached. Registration fee is $600 and to be paid via credit card at registration. See registration link at course info website.

The study of permaculture helps gardeners, landowners, and farmers combine knowledge of ecology combined with its application to supporting healthy soil, water conservation, and biodiversity. Permaculture systems meet human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Common practices include no-till gardening, rainwater catchment, forest gardening, and agroforestry.

View the full syllabus for the course and find registration information at the course info website.

Horticulture’s distance learning program offers two other online permaculture design courses:

Completion of a single class gives students a certificate of completion from the Horticulture and continuing education units*. Completion of all three courses gives students the portfolio necessary to apply for an internationally recognized certification in Permaculture Design though the Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute. Registration opens about six weeks before  courses begins.

Comments No Comments »

From Betsy Leonard, ‘81, Organic Farm Coordinator, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES):

The 2014 season was a great success Dilmun Hill, Cornell’s student-run farm! I hope you can come to join us in celebrating the end of the season, sharing updates on Dilmun Hill and learning about our plans for the future. Lunch foods provided!

What: Dilmun 2014 Season Wrap-Up
Where: 102 Mann Library
When: Dec. 6th 12:00pm-2:00pm.

There will presentations reviewing the happenings at the farm this past season. Topics will include:

  • New steering members
  • Vegetable production in review
  • Outreach events
  • New organizational structure
  • And much more.

There will also be a slide show and refreshments!

dilmun hill wrap up poster

Comments No Comments »

3-D food printer

3-D food printer

Cornell Food Systems Global Summit
Public-Private Partnerships to Enhance Food Systems
December 8, 2014
8:00 am – 7:00 pm

From printed phyllo pastries to petite peppers packing powerful nutritional punches, innovation and interdisciplinary collaboration will be key ingredients forming the future of food. Academic experts and industry insiders will gather at Cornell University on December 8 for a global summit to discuss new approaches to emerging food system challenges.

They will serve up fresh findings and engaging exchanges on a range of topics, from the business of food, to its nutrition, safety and consumption around the world. Also on the menu: hands-on technology demonstrations, resource exhibits, networking opportunities, and presentations from the next generation of food scientists and researchers.

Special emphasis will be placed on the power of integrative approaches and the role that public-private partnerships can play in driving innovation and shaping sustainable solutions. For more information and registration, visit the Cornell Food Systems Global Summit website.

Presenteres include SIPS faculty Susan Brown and Michael Mazourek.

Comments No Comments »

Spencer Lake from above.

Spencer Lake from above.

From Tom Whitlow:

You are cordially invited to attend my Restoration Ecology (HORT 4400) class presentation on Spencer Lake, soon to become Catatonk Creek again after more than 150 years of impoundment.

Restoring Spencer Lake to Catatonk Creek
A 158 Year Legacy

7:00 p.m. Thursday Dec. 4
Community Room, Ecology House
111 Country Club Rd., Ithaca, NY
(Behind African Studies on Triphammer Rd.)
Open to the campus and Ithaca community
For information, contact Tom Whitlow: thw2@cornell.edu

Comments No Comments »