Archive for the “CUAES” Category

From Betsy Leonard, ‘81, Organic Farm Coordinator, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES):

The 2014 season was a great success Dilmun Hill, Cornell’s student-run farm! I hope you can come to join us in celebrating the end of the season, sharing updates on Dilmun Hill and learning about our plans for the future. Lunch foods provided!

What: Dilmun 2014 Season Wrap-Up
Where: 102 Mann Library
When: Dec. 6th 12:00pm-2:00pm.

There will presentations reviewing the happenings at the farm this past season. Topics will include:

  • New steering members
  • Vegetable production in review
  • Outreach events
  • New organizational structure
  • And much more.

There will also be a slide show and refreshments!

dilmun hill wrap up poster

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dilmun_hill_open_houseFriday, September 5, 3 – 6 p.m.

Tour Dilmun Hill (Cornell’s student-run farm) and MacDaniels Nut Grove (forest farming research and education center), and have some fun while learning about sustainable vegetable production and agroforestry.

Tours of the Grove, will depart from Dilmun at 3:30 and at 4:30 and will include mushrooms taste testing.

Other scheduled activities include:

  • Pumpkin painting
  • T-shirt decorating (bring your own shirt)
  • Lacto-fermented pickling workshop
  • Tomato taste tests
  • And more

Finger foods provided. Bring a dish to pass if inspired.

Contact: Alena Hutchinson amh345@cornell.edu.

Map.

open house poster

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fun day flyerVia CALS Notes [2014-08-22]:

Family centered open house at the organic acres at the  H.C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y.

See how cotton and peanuts grow, learn about “good” bugs and “bad” bugs, taste the best roasted peppers, learn about food preservation, bend hoops for high tunnels, watch plastic mulch equipment in action (laying, lifting and recycling) and get tips from researchers about gardening, growing and composting practices. Go on a wagon ride, get your face painted and enjoy farm-fresh snacks.

Free admission and all are welcome!

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Associate professor Neil Mattson (right) discusses energy-efficient lighting options with growers at this summer's Greenhouse IPM Workshop in the Plant Science Purple Greenhouses on Tower Road.

Associate professor Neil Mattson (right) discusses energy-efficient lighting options with growers at this summer’s Greenhouse IPM Workshop in the Plant Science Purple Greenhouses on Tower Road.

Reposted from CALS Notes [2014-08-17]:

CALS is about to become a whole lot “greener” thanks to a major greenhouse renovation scheme now underway at both the Ithaca and Geneva campuses. The initiative, called for in the college’s Master Plan, aims to eliminate or replace older, energy inefficient greenhouses with state-of-the-art structures that will provide faculty, staff and students with safe, spacious and sustainable facilities in which to conduct research.

New greenhouses are already under construction at CALS satellite campus at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, NY, thanks to $4.3M in funds received from New York State. Construction also began earlier this month to replace the Bailey Conservatory Greenhouse adjacent to the Plant Science Building, which wasclosed in 2010 due to health and safety concerns. And CALS is also building new greenhouses (rendering above) at the Guterman complex on the Ithaca campus with a mix of college funds and a $500,000 grant awarded through the Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council.

These renovations are taking place in concert with a new lean process improvement initiative undertaken by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station that’s designed to save on greenhouse energy usage without diminishing the essential value of Cornell’s greenhouses. Not only will this effort save money, it will also help to diminish the carbon footprint of both CALS and Cornell.

What a way to save green by going green!

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“I have a much better understanding of our entire operation from participating in the project,” said greenhouse grower Kendra Hutchins.

“I have a much better understanding of our entire operation from participating in the project,” said greenhouse grower Kendra Hutchins.

By Nancy Doolittle, reposted from Pawprint [2014-06-12]:

Greenhouses are essential to hundreds of Cornell faculty and students who need to maintain and grow plants year round for research, teaching and outreach, especially in Ithaca. But, greenhouses are hardly green.

This past year, staff and faculty from the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES) worked with staff from Organizational Effectiveness to use the “lean” process improvement approach to save on greenhouse energy without diminishing the essential value of Cornell’s greenhouses.

The energy currently used to heat and light 164 Ithaca campus greenhouse units – the largest noncommercial greenhouse facility in New York State – produces the same greenhouse gas emissions each year as do 2,642 passenger vehicles or 1,744 homes. The greenhouses off Tower and Caldwell roads total 144,624 square feet; and on a square-foot basis, heating a greenhouse costs $5 to $9.50 annually and lighting $3 to $6 annually.

“Our efforts to save energy began with the greenhouse growers,” said Mike Hoffmann, director of CUAES and associate dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), referring to the staff-empowered approach utilized by the lean process.

Read the whole article.

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dilmun hill crewReposted from CALS Notes:

Ever wonder what it takes to manage operations at an organic and sustainable student-run farm? It’s not all fun and games (though there’s a bit of that, too). For the curious, check out the recently published Market Garden Report from Cornell’s own student-run organic farm at Dilmun Hill. The report highlights Dilmun’s 2013 farming and marketing operations in detail. Find out what produce was grown, where it was sold, eaten and by whom. Learn about the kinds of infrastructure improvements that were made, the farm’s bed design and crop rotation plan, its irrigation and nutrient management practices, and its marketing and outreach activities. The report provides a fascinating primer into what it takes to manage a vibrant and successful organic farming enterprise!

But growing and selling produce as part of the Market Garden project is only one among many important research and learning experiences taking place at Dilmun Hill. Learn more about the soil management, permaculture, landscaping and other projects currently underway.

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2013 Dilmun Hill farmstand and crew

2013 Dilmun Hill farmstand and crew

From Betsy Leonard, Organic Farm Coordinator, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES):

Dilmun Hill, Cornell’s student-managed farm, is looking for undergraduate students to fill two positions this summer:

  • Market Garden Manager – The Market Garden Manager is in charge of the vegetable production and sales at Dilmun Hill. Managers are hired in late winter and are expected to participate in farm operations for the next year and a half. Throughout their term Market Garden Managers perform a wide variety of tasks, with the simultaneous expectation of communicating effectively between the other managers, staff, and the general Dilmun Hill community. Download position description/application.
  • Student Researcher – If you have a cool idea for an agricultural research project you want to conduct at Dilmun Hill, this position is for you. If you don’t know where to start, please ask us and we can help you make connections with faculty. Download position description/application.

Applications are due February 12th. Please download (links above) and submit your application to Betsy Leonard (bai1@cornell.edu) by midnight on February 12 2014 to be considered.

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Staff install deer fence at Thompson Research Farm. Photo: Anja Timm.

Staff install deer fence at Thompson Research Farm. Photo: Anja Timm.

Staff at the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville, N.Y., recently installed one mile of eight-foot-tall woven wire fence to protect 30 acres of organic research projects — including tomato-, pepper- and cucurbit-breeding, trials on soil health and crop rotation and more — from deer damage.

And they did it  for 80% less than the cost of hiring an outside contractor.

Heavy deer pressure threatens the accuracy of most small-plot agricultural research. Staff from many research programs install temporary electric fencing to protect research plots, a significant ongoing investment in time and materials.

The Freevile farm is one of seven managed by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station. CUAES staff plan to replicate this fencing model at other farms.

Read full post by Anja Timm at CALS Notes.

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dilmun_hill_open_houseFrom Anja Timm, CUAES:

Join our annual field day at Dilmun Hill Student Farm and MacDaniel’s Nut Grove Friday Sunday, September 13 15, 2013 at 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

Come out to the farm for salsa making, mushroom inoculation workshops, tomato tasting, t-shirt printing and tours of both Dilmun Hill and the Nut Grove. Learn about perennial polycultures at our new permaculture garden. Please bring plates, utensils and cups – there will be plenty of yummy food to share, made with veggies straight from the farm!

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More than 120 people attended the Family Field Day at the organic acres of the Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm Sunday. Kathryn J. Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, welcomed the group, and was followed by sessions focusing on techniques home gardeners (as well as small farmers) can use – such as cover crops, mulches and hand tools to control weeds, seed saving, and trickle irrigation and more – led by Cornell experts and others.

There was also lots of yummy food (roasted peppers, fresh fruit, organic chocolate milk) and activities for the whole family, including an up-close view of birds of prey handled by student volunteers working with the Cornell Raptor Program.

The Homer C. Thompson Vegetable Research Farm is managed by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station.

Horticulture Ph.D. candidate Megan Gregory shows gardeners how to use cover crops to improve soil.

Horticulture Ph.D. candidate Megan Gregory (right) shows gardeners how to use cover crops to improve soil.

Charles Mohler, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, demonstrated a wide range of weed control tools.

Charles Mohler, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, demonstrated a wide range of weed control tools.

Student volunteers with the Cornell Raptor Program gave attendees an up-close look at birds of prey.

Student volunteers with the Cornell Raptor Program gave attendees an up-close look at birds of prey.

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