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Tastings, tours and more at the Cornell Orchards Apple Spectacular October 1

The Peck Lab will lead orchard tours at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

The Peck Lab will lead orchard tours at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Sunday, October 1, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Cornell Orchards, 701 Dryden Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850

Come join the Cornell Orchards Store, Cornell Catering, and the Cornell Hard Cider Program Work Team for a family-friendly Finger Lakes Cider Week event celebrating all things apples and cider!

Cornell is a leader in hard cider research and outreach, and even teaches an undergraduate course on hard cider production!  We will have a wide selection of specialized cider apple varieties available for tasting and participants can create their own cider blends using freshly pressed apple juice.

Starting at 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m., the Peck Lab will lead walking tours of high-density cider apple research orchards. There will also be hard cider tastings from local producers along with delicious food pairings, and of course plenty of apples and sweet cider from Cornell’s research farms to purchase and take home.

Map, more information.

Horticulture graduate students Adam Karl and Nathan Wojtyna juice cider apples for hands-on 'make your own blend' tasting activity.

Come participate in a ‘make your own cider blend’ tasting activity.

Field day season

The School of Integrative Plant Sciences has hosted three field days in the last two days.

August 1 was the Floriculture Field Day, which attracted 90 growers, educators and others to a morning of presentations on campus followed by lunch, tours of annual trials and perennial flower plantings, and hands-on workshops at the Bluegrass Lane Turf and Landscape Research Center.

Entomologist Scott McArt lead session on pollinator-friendly gardens at Bluegrass Lane.

Entomologist Scott McArt leads a session on pollinator-friendly gardens at Bluegrass Lane.

Floriculture Field Day participants used flags to vote for their favorite flowers.

Floriculture Field Day participants used flags to vote for their favorite flowers.

Growers check out container plantings at Bluegrass Laned

Growers check out container plantings at Bluegrass Lane.

Also August 1, more than 100 people attended the Cornell Industrial Hemp Field Day at the NYSIP Foundation Seed Barn on Dryden Road. They got a close-up look at trials featuring  17 grain, fiber and dual-purpose industrial hemp varieties, and heard the latest from experts from Cornell and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets on potential pests and diseases, seed quality and other topics. Visit the Cornell Industrial Hemp website for more information.

Growers inspect variety trials.

Chris Smart, director of the School of Integrative Plant Science, shares Cornell's plans for industrial hemp research and outreach.

Chris Smart, director of the School of Integrative Plant Science, shares Cornell’s plans for industrial hemp research and outreach.

August 2, horticulture researchers at Bluegrass Lane hosted an informal collaborative open house for nearly 100 SIPS, CUAES, NYSAES, and Grounds staff, students, interns and volunteers. Attendees viewed trials of annuals and perennials, hybrid oaks, tree drought evaluation, David Austin Roses, and more.

Collaborative open house visitors tour annual and perennial plantings at Bluegrass Lane. (Photo: Anja Timm)

Collaborative open house visitors tour annual and perennial plantings at Bluegrass Lane. (Photo: Anja Timm)

Overwintered Agapanthus in the perennial plantings at Bluegrass Lane. (Photo: Anja Timm)

Overwintered Agapanthus in the perennial plantings at Bluegrass Lane. (Photo: Anja Timm)

Bluegrass Lane and the Hemp Field Trials are managed by the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES).

Students get taste of Long Island agriculture


From Mark Bridgen, professor in the Horticulture Section and director of the Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center (LIHREC):

Seven plant breeding graduate students came down for a visit June 25 to get a look at Long Island agriculture. Along with other guests, we toured the Koppert Cress USA microgreen production facility in Riverhead, N.Y. (above), Harbes Family Farm, an agritourism destination in Mattituck, the tropical plant greenhouses and gardens of Landcraft Environments in Mattituck, and the vineyards and winery of Bedell Cellars in Cutchogue.

Greenhouse staff plow on through nor’easter

Greenhouse grower Julie Blaha relishes the springtime color March 15, as she waters flowers at the Post Labs in the middle of a snowstorm. (Photo: Blaine Friedlander/Cornell Chronicle)

Greenhouse grower Julie Blaha relishes the springtime color March 15, as she waters flowers at the Post Labs in the middle of a snowstorm. (Photo: Blaine Friedlander/Cornell Chronicle)

Excerpted from the Cornell Chronicle [2017-03-16]:

For the first time since February 2014, Cornell closed the Ithaca campus due to snow, halting all but essential services from noon March 14 until 4:30 p.m. March 15.

Although officially closed, the work of Cornell continued. Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES) greenhouse grower Julie Blaha braved the roads from her home in Odessa, New York, to tend plants in the Kenneth Post Laboratories and Greenhouses, while grower Laurence Walsh patched several broken windowpanes when melted snow and ice fell through the roof.

Walsh, born and raised in Hawaii, moved to Ithaca six months ago. “I have discovered that I love the cold,” he said. “It’s so refreshing.”

United Parcel Service suspended Ithaca operations due to the snow, but Andy Leed, CUAES greenhouse manager, picked up his weekly shipment of beneficial insects – cucumeris mites that control greenhouse thrips and persimilis that control spider mites. “UPS unloaded their 18-wheeler truck to sort through it to find my box,” said Leed. “These are biocontrols; they’re tropical insects. If they freeze, they’re gone.”

Read the whole article.

Geneva saves Cornell Orchards’ cider season

Cider coming off the press at Cornell Orchards. ()Photo: Jason Koski/Cornell Marketing)

Cider coming off the press at Cornell Orchards. ()Photo: Jason Koski/Cornell Marketing)

Cornell Chronicle [2016-12-06]:

Unfavorable apple growing conditions in Ithaca this season nearly crushed a seasonal favorite: Cornell Orchards’ cider. But with the help of Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, New York, the popular beverage pressed right on campus is once again available to the Cornell community.

For a time this fall, the production of Cornell cider seemed in jeopardy. Erratic temperatures and a late spring frost followed by a persistent summer drought spelled trouble for the Ithaca campus apple trees used to make the cider.

While Ithaca’s apples suffered, the orchards 50 miles north in Geneva benefited from slightly more favorable conditions.

Read the whole article.

 

Kale Is About To Have An Identity Crisis

Photos: Hannah Swegarden

Photos: Hannah Swegarden

NPR’s The Salt [2016-11-28]:

Kale is getting a makeover, and the very essence of kaliness may hang in the balance.

To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, horticulture professor Philip Griffiths of Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Science and graduate student Hannah Swegarden are soliciting consumers’ kale reflections — the good, the bad, and the ugly. The scientists face a philosophic question for the ages. Asks Swegarden:

“How far can you push a consumer’s concept of what kale is, before it’s not kale anymore?”

Kale, like many other vegetables, has been bred with agricultural practicality in mind, selected for virtues like drought- and disease-resistance. But Swegarden says those traits don’t necessarily translate into a better taste and appearance, qualities that matter more to consumers. Griffiths has been working with kale for years, so he and Swegarden decided to see if they could develop strains to seduce farmers and consumers alike.

Read the whole post.

 

Reminder: Dilmun Hill’s 20th Anniversary Celebration Saturday

dilmun 20th banner

From the Dilmun Hill Student Farm farm managers:

Join us on the Farm to help celebrate Dilmun Hill Cornell Student Organic Farm’s 20th year in existence!

Activities, demonstrations, farm tours, food, drinks, live music & more!

We will be joined by a vareity of other on-campus organizations including Beekeeping Club, Fantastic Fungi Fanatics, Snodwigs, and many more. Stay tuned to here about all our special guests.

This event is FREE, open to the public, and kid-friendly.

Parking is available at the Cornell Print Services Parking lot on the SE corner of Pine Tree Rd and Dryden Rd; at the Oxley parking lot across Dryden Rd from the Humphrey Facilities Plant; and at the O lot on Campus Rd near the intersection of Judd Falls and Campus Rd. All three lots have pedestrian paths that lead to the four way stop intersection of Dryden Rd and Pine Tree Rd. Please cross in the marked pedestrian cross walks and follow the pedestrian path across the new bridge over Pine Tree Rd. The entrance to Dilmun is on the left side of the Recreation Path just over the bridge. If you need accommodations to park in the designated handicap space in the driveway, please contact Mandy Economos @ (607) 255-3332 or email mse55@cornell.edu prior to the event this Saturday, 10/29.

More information.

Toward Sustainability Foundation grant deadline is Dec. 5

For more than 15 years, CALS has bolstered its sustainability research with a steady stream of gifts from the Toward Sustainability Foundation (TSF), a Massachusetts-based organization founded by an anonymous, eco-minded Cornell alumna.

Since 1999, TSF provided more than $1.2 million in funding for more than 100 faculty and student projects that examine the technological, social, political, and economic elements of sustainable agriculture.

The deadline for proposals for the 2017 round of funding is December 5, 2016

Read more about TSF grants, download the full Request for Proposals, and view titles and contacts of recent projects.

A 2016 Toward Sustainability Foundation grant helped fuel construction of a moveable high tunnell at Dilmun Hill Student Farm featuring an innovative design by Alena Hutchinson '18.

A 2016 Toward Sustainability Foundation grant helped fuel construction of a movable high tunnel at Dilmun Hill Student Farm featuring an innovative design by Alena Hutchinson ’18.

In the news: Picking the perfect pumpkin and more

Steve Reiners

Steve Reiners

Tricks for perfect pumpkin picking [Cornell Media Relations tip sheet 2016-10-10] – Horticulture Section professor and pumpkin expert Steve Reiners shares some tips on how to pick the perfect pumpkin for the Halloween season. See also this video from 2012:

Other recent news of horticultural interest from the Cornell Chronicle:

Celebrate Dilmun Hill’s 20th Anniversary October 29

Happy 20th banner

Via Betsy Leonard ‘81, Organic Farm Coordinator, Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES):

Dilmun Hill Student Organic Farm is pleased to invite you to our 20th Anniversary Celebration!

Please join us on the Farm on Saturday, October 29th from 1:00pm to 4:00pm for food & drink, activities, and live music.

We will be hosting an array of other student-lead Cornell organizations, faculty, and community members as we come together to celebrate twenty years of student farming at Dilmun.

This event is kid-friendly and open to the public, so please bring along any family and friends.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Questions? Comments? Contact Isabel at ig234@cornell.edu

Please RSVP on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1395083610519474/

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