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‘Planting Futures’ community art project Dec. 8

From the Qualities of Life working group at the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies & Dept of Anthropology:

We invite you to take a few minutes to participate in a community art project.

Come plant a bulb and a dream!

There is power in making beauty and power in making beauty together.

We welcome you to write down what you would like to cultivate–the quality of life you want to protect and nurture–in your own life, on our campus, in the world and plant it under one of the 1,600 bulbs waiting for you.

Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 10:00am to 12:30pm
Wee Stinky Glen outside the upper entrance of the Cornell Store

“All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today.” – Indian Proverb

planting futures flyer

Seminar video: The search for sour rot in Tasmanian vineyards

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar and Dreer Award Presentation, The search for sour rot in Tasmanian vineyards  with Megan Hall, PhD candidate, Graduate Field of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, it  is available online.

More information about the Dreer Award.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Deportation plan will make U.S. food and wine more expensive

Vanden Heuvel

Vanden Heuvel

President-elect Donald Trump’s plans to deport up to three million undocumented immigrants will make U.S-produced food and wine more expensive and less available.

That’s the warning from Justine Vanden Heuvel, associate  professor in the Horticulture Section at Cornell University, and Mary Jo Dudley, director of the Cornell Farmworker Program, in an article in The Conversation, an independent source of news and views from the academic and research community.

“What he doesn’t seem to realize is how integral undocumented workers are to America’s food supply. Our scholarship at Cornell combined with research in other areas of agriculture reveal the significant impact his plans would have on the foods we eat and beverages we consume each and every day,” they write.

“Since these immigrants do much of the heavy lifting in American agriculture, preserving the current workforce and ensuring a continuing supply of laborers is a top priority for producers – and should be for consumers who value the foods and beverages we currently enjoy on our dinner tables,” they add.

The authors cite a report commissioned by the American Farm Bureau Federation predicting  decreases of 15 to 31 percent in vegetable production and 30 to 61 percent in fruit production if undocumented workers are deported and the border is closed. The study also predicts food price increases of 5 to 6 percent and decreased availability of fruit, vegetables, meat and dairy products.

Read the whole article.

Cheese tasting Friday at Cornell Orchards

Celebrate the wonderful pairing of apples with Lively Run Goat Dairy goat and cow cheeses at this free event, December 2 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Cornell Orchards.

cheese-tastingx640

New book helps researchers find innovative solutions to complex challenges

From USDA-SARE Program news release:

Laurie Drinkwater

Author Laurie Drinkwater, professor, Horticulture Section

As farmers and ranchers strive to maintain profitability, they face a multitude of pressures such as protecting water and air resources, conserving biodiversity and limiting soil erosion. Too often, however, single-faceted agricultural research fails to account for the complex links between critical environmental, social and economic factors.

The result? Piecemeal solutions to complex and interrelated problems. Now, SARE’s groundbreaking Systems Research for Agriculture, by Laurie Drinkwater, professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, provides the theories and tools that researchers and producers need to design and implement interdisciplinary systems research projects that advance sustainable agroecosystems.

book coverFrom USDA Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program news release:Systems Research for Agriculture is based on groundbreaking SARE-funded research trials that mimic an entire production system rather than substituting and comparing individual practices. Modifying research trials to fit local best farming practices allows systems-level changes in economic, social and environmental conditions to emerge and be better studied. While the model requires close collaboration between researchers and producers, it provides producers with practical insight into the on-farm adoption of new techniques.

Systems Research for Agriculture addresses the theoretical basis for agricultural systems research and provides a roadmap for building effective interdisciplinary and multi-stakeholder teams. This handbook is essential reading for researchers and producers working together to plan, conduct and analyze the complexities of multifaceted systems research experiments.

Systems Research for Agriculture is available as a free download at www.sare.org/Systems. Print copies can be ordered for $20 plus shipping and handling. Discounts are available for orders of 10 items or more.

Art of Horticulture final projects

If you’d like to catch a glimpse of students’ final projects in Marcia Eames-Sheavly’s Art of Horticulture class, you can sneak a peek online.

You can also see previous classes’ work (as well as other class projects and videos) by visiting the Art of Horticulture’s gallery page.

Clockwise: Floral equine (watercolor pencil), Nature room (detail), Insects from plant parts, Concrete leaf cast placesettings, table. Click image for larger view.

Clockwise: Floral equine (watercolor pencil), Nature room (detail), Insects from plant parts, Concrete leaf cast place settings and table. Click image for larger view.

Registration now open for online permaculture design course

Permaculture systems meet humans needs while restoring ecosystem health.

Permaculture systems meet humans needs while restoring ecosystem health.

From Lori Brewer:

Registration is now open for the online course Permaculture Design: Ecosystem Mimicry, offered Jan. 16 through March 2, 2017 through the Horticulture Section’s distance learning program. Space is limited to 15 participants. Registration closes when limit is reached. Registration fee is $675 and to be paid via credit card at registration. See registration link at course info website.

The study of permaculture helps gardeners, landowners, and farmers combine knowledge of ecology combined with its application to supporting healthy soil, water conservation, and biodiversity. Permaculture systems meet human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Common practices include no-till gardening, rainwater catchment, forest gardening, and agroforestry.

View the full syllabus for the course and find registration information at the course info website.

The Horticulture Section’s distance learning program offers two other online permaculture design courses:

Completion of a single class gives students a certificate of completion from the Horticulture Section and continuing education units. Completion of all three courses gives students the portfolio necessary to apply for an internationally recognized certification in Permaculture Design though the Finger Lakes Permaculture Institute. Registration opens about six weeks before  courses begins.

‘Pings’ and ‘pops’ reveal sunflower stress

Via CALS Instagram:

sunflower and petiole

A sunflower is astonishing for more than just its outward beauty. Associate professor Taryn Bauerle and her students are tracking how drought-stricken sunflower roots send electrical signals to the leaves to close their pores. Bauerle and her students also listen for the “pops” and “pings” that denote hydraulic signals via breaks in the plant’s water column. Research conducted by Bauerle is aimed at addressing critical issues about how plants respond to stress, from the impacts of drought to pressures exerted by herbivore pests. The image is a magnified look at the sunflower’s petiole, the stalk that joins leaf and stem. #sunflowerscience#CornellCALS #nature #sunflower#science #horticulture

Kale Is About To Have An Identity Crisis

Photos: Hannah Swegarden

Photos: Hannah Swegarden

NPR’s The Salt [2016-11-28]:

Kale is getting a makeover, and the very essence of kaliness may hang in the balance.

To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, horticulture professor Philip Griffiths of Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Science and graduate student Hannah Swegarden are soliciting consumers’ kale reflections — the good, the bad, and the ugly. The scientists face a philosophic question for the ages. Asks Swegarden:

“How far can you push a consumer’s concept of what kale is, before it’s not kale anymore?”

Kale, like many other vegetables, has been bred with agricultural practicality in mind, selected for virtues like drought- and disease-resistance. But Swegarden says those traits don’t necessarily translate into a better taste and appearance, qualities that matter more to consumers. Griffiths has been working with kale for years, so he and Swegarden decided to see if they could develop strains to seduce farmers and consumers alike.

Read the whole post.

 

Video: Björkman, Mazourek on NBC News Mach

Thomas Björkman and Michael Mazourek share insights into their research in this video feature at NBC News’ science and technology site:  Meet the Scientists Breeding Vegetables for Our Changing Environment.

“Artificial intelligence, new smartphones and missions to Mars now dominate innovation headlines, but seemingly less sexy scientific progress is landing on our plates every day. And it’s making the food we eat better, safer, more abundant, and more delicious in the process.” Read full accompanying article.

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