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Infographic: How indoor agriculture is a boon to NY’s foodies

As part of the lead-up to the Indoor Ag-Con New York conference October 15 in New York City, featured speaker and Cornell greenhouse horticulture specialist Neil Mattson  co-created the infographic below. Mattson will be part of a panel addressing What do scientists view as the ‘next big thing’ in indoor agriculture? The one-day event features 12 keynotes, curated lunchtime discussion tables, and a drinks party. More info.

Download poster-sized infographic  .pdf.

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Seminar video: Supporting the American Cut Flower Industry

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar, Supporting the American Cut Flower Industry, with Chris Wien, Horticulture Section, Cornell University, it’s available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

The apple machine is back!

Hungry for a tasty, crisp apple? Satisfy that craving by visiting the apple vending machine just inside the front door of Mann Library.

Graduate Field of Horticulture students pick the fruit from Cornell Orchards and the Horticulture Section’s Lansing Orchard and stock the machine. Proceeds support activities of Society for Horticulture Graduate Students (SoHo).

The varieties available change through the harvest season. So stop back often.

Horticulture graduate students Annika Huber and Juana Muñoz Ucros stocking the apple machine with varieties picked by grad students last weekend at Cornell Orchards.

Horticulture graduate students Annika Huber and Juana Muñoz Ucros stocking the apple machine with varieties picked by grad students last weekend at Cornell Orchards.

Cornell Orchards is open for the season!

Yummy applesFrom Kristina Engel-Ross, Sales Manager, Cornell Orchards:

Cornell Orchards retail store will open for the season Friday August 28, and will be open next week Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

It’s early in the harvest season. But we have some great fruit for you:

  • Red Haven peaches
  • John Boy peaches
  • Shiro plums
  • Ginger Gold apples
  • Sansa apples
  • Clapp pears

Email me (orchards@cornell.edu) if you’d like to be added to our email list. (Every week or so I’ll let you know about available fruit varieties and store specials and what hours we’re open.) Or visit our website and/or follow us on Facebook to get the latest.

 

Seminar: Building Better Grapevines with Peter Cousins

Peter Cousins

Peter Cousins

Building Better Grapevines

A public seminar by Dr. Peter Cousins
Grape breeder, E. & J. Gallo Winery (formerly Grape Breeder and Geneticist, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Geneva, N.Y.)

August 31, 5 p.m.
Stocking Hall 146

Sponsored by the Cornell Viticulture & Enology Program

More information: Dr. Justine Vanden Heuvel, jev32@cornell.edu

Registration open for online courses for farmers

online courses for small farmersFrom Erica Frenay, Beginning Farmer Project, Cornell Small Farm Program (ejf5@cornell.edu):

Late Fall through Winter and early Spring is a great time for farmers to rest, slow down the frenetic pace (at least somewhat), and build new skills for the coming growing season. If you sign up for an online course through the Northeast Beginning Farmer Project, you don’t even need to leave your home to connect with other farmers, work on your farm plans, and gain practical tips.

Are there courses for me? From aspiring to experienced farmers, there is a course for nearly everyone. If you’re just getting started exploring farming as a career, BF 101: Starting at Square One and BF 102: Markets and Profits, were designed with you in mind. For those with at least a few years of farm management experience, check out BF 204: QuickBooks for Farmers and BF 203: Holistic Financial Planning to take your skills to the next level. There’s a handy chart on our course homepage to direct you to the right courses for your experience level.

What are the courses like? All of our courses consist of weekly real-time webinars followed by homework, readings, and discussions on your own time in an online setting. If you aren’t able to attend the live webinars, they are always recorded for later viewing.

Qualify for a 0% interest loan! Participants who complete all requirements of one or more online courses are eligible to be endorsed for a 0% interest loan of up to $10,000 through Kiva Zip.

Each course is $200, but up to 4 people from the same farm may participate without paying extra. See the course description page for more on the course learning objectives, instructors, and outline.

These courses are part of the line-up of 16 online courses offered this Fall, Winter and Spring by the Cornell Small Farms Program. Learn which courses would be best for you, read about our team of experienced instructors, see answers to Frequently Asked Questions, and  view the calendar of course offerings for 2015-2016.

Courses often fill very quickly, so don’t miss your chance to sign up today!

Dreer Seminar Sept. 2: Urban Agriculture and Aquaponics in Switzerland

Urban Agriculture and Aquaponics in Switzerland
September 2, 12:15 p.m.
22 Plant Science Building

A Seminar by 2014 Dreer Award recipient Brett Morgan

The Frederick Dreer Award, administered by the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, offers a wonderful opportunity for one or more students to spend 4 months to up to a year abroad pursuing his or her interests related to horticulture. The application deadline for the current cycle has passed. But you can view the application and instructions to start planning ahead for the 2016 award. (Application deadline tentatively late Feb./early March 2016.)

click for printable poster

Sept. 10 ag resiliency summit takes on severe-weather planning

Via Cornell Chronicle [2015-08-14]:

A summit meeting to identify resources and opportunities to improve agricultural resiliency to severe weather across New York state will explore current initiatives and link researchers and extension members.

Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York, will host the New York State Agricultural Resiliency Summit, Thursday, Sept. 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Jordan Hall. The summit aims to increase individual and collective capacity to prepare for, respond to and recover from weather-related events.

Participants will analyze the status of agricultural resiliency and emergency engagement and outline steps to improve how all stakeholders interact during a disaster. Breakout sessions will cover working with new weather patterns, improving communication before and after a severe weather event, and strategies to improve community preparedness.

The event is free, but preregistration is required. Direct questions about the summit to Trevor Partridge, 315-558–2815, tfp23@cornell.edu.

The summit is funded by Empire State Development through a grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration.

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120+ attend Floriculture Field Day

Alan Armitage, University of Georgia emeritus professor and best-selling author, points out overwintered pineapple lilies (Eucomis spp.) at Bluegrass Lane.

Alan Armitage, University of Georgia emeritus professor and best-selling author, points out overwintered pineapple lilies (Eucomis spp.) at Bluegrass Lane.

More than 120 greenhouse growers and retailers, florists, educators and others from around New York and the Northeast attended the annual Cornell Floriculture Field Day August 11. The day included morning presentations on campus followed by afternoon tours of flower trials at the Bluegrass Lane Turf and Landscape Research Facility and cutflower and high tunnel research at Maple Avenue.

After a warm welcome from Kathryn Boor, Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, attendees were treated by a talk on What’s trending in annuals, perennials and edibles by Alan Armitage, emeritus professor at the University of Georgia and best-selling author. Armitage also demonstrated his new Greatest Perennials and Annuals app for the group.  They also heard from Cornell plant pathologist Margery Daugherty on greenhouse diseases, Cornell horticulture professor Chris Wien on high tunnel cut flower production, and Peter Konjoian, Konjoian’s Floriculture Education Services, on making the switch to greenhouse vegetables from ornamentals.

Donald Horowitz '77, Wittendale's Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the new Edibles Division in the 2015 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. He also finished first in the Hanging Basket Division and third in the Open Division.

Donald Horowitz ’77, Wittendale’s Florist & Greenhouses, East Hampton, N.Y. took first place in the new Edibles Division in the 2015 Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. He also finished first in the Hanging Basket Division and third in the Open Division.

In the afternoon at Bluegrass Lane, attendees got hands-on experience diagnosing pests and diseases, toured favorite perennials, and viewed trials of annual flowers and container growing media and demonstrations of containers combining edibles and ornamentals.

The afternoon also featured the announcement of the winners of the twelfth annual Kathy Pufahl Memorial Container Design Competition. Pufahl, who founded Beds and Borders, Inc., Laurel, N.Y., was a staple on the horticultural educational seminar circuit, spreading her container ideas far and wide. It is her vision that changed the way the horticulture industry looks at the spring container business. Her influence brought back a bit of the art and beauty to the business. All proceeds from the contest — which has topped $10,000 since its inception — go directly to IBD research at Mt. Sinai Hospital, to help ensure a bright future for Kathy’s daughter and others like her, who have Crohn’s disease. For more information about the competition, contact: Karen Hall nysfi.org@gmail.com.

Horticulture chair Steve Reiners welcomes field day attendees to Bluegrass Lane.

Horticulture chair Steve Reiners welcomes field day attendees to Bluegrass Lane.

Attendees view demonstration of mixed vegetable/ornamental container plantings. "For many, the garden of the future will be on their deck," Armitage told the group.

Attendees view demonstration of mixed vegetable/ornamental container plantings. “For many, the garden of the future will be on their deck,” Armitage told the group.

Plant pathologist Margery Daugherty and entomologist John Sanderson help attendees identify insect pests and diseases on perennials at Bluegrass Lane.

Plant pathologist Margery Daugherty and entomologist John Sanderson help attendees identify insect pests and diseases on perennials at Bluegrass Lane.

Horticulture professor Chris Wien explains his cut flower research at the Maple Avenue research facility.

Horticulture professor Chris Wien explains his cut flower research at the Maple Avenue research facility.

Cornell, Ithaca College offer ag education master’s

Students learn about vegetable production equipment at  Cornell's Thompson Research Farm in Freeville.

Students learn about vegetable production equipment at Cornell’s Thompson Research Farm in Freeville.

Cornell Chronicle [2015-08-11]:

Cornell University and Ithaca College will offer a new Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program to help meet growing demand for qualified agricultural educators. Students in the graduate program will earn a degree in agriculture education from Ithaca College in collaboration with Cornell Connect, a program of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS).

“This unique M.A.T. in agriculture education combines the strength of an established, highly regarded education program at Ithaca College with the internationally recognized agricultural knowledge of Cornell,” said Jeff Perry, education specialist in CALS’ School of Integrative Plant Science. “Students will graduate with a strong knowledge of the agricultural education community while also being comfortable with their general education peers.”

Read the whole article.