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SAGES Cookbook to support Geneva Campus Bike Share

Reposted from the SIPS blog, Discovery that Connects:

Craving some Black Magic Cake, Cherry Stuffed Tenderloin, or Red Lentil Coconut Curry?  These are just some of the thirty nine recipes in the 2017 cookbook assembled by the Student Association of the Geneva Experiment Station (SAGES) to benefit the Geneva Bike Share Program.

Recipes were contributed by faculty, staff, and students on the Geneva campus. SAGES President Adrienne Gorny draws particular attention to those derived from annual Chili Cook-offs, Cookie Bake-Offs, and Underappreciated Vegetable Cook-offs; this last being an event where Geneva campus employees are challenged to produce a dish incorporating a pre-determined underappreciated vegetable. Hannah Swegarden recommends her recipe for Tomato Basil Soup, perfect for this time of year when gardens are bursting with these two ingredients.

Also featured are recipes from a variety of cultural traditions such as George Abawi’s Baklava, several Scandinavian desserts, and Pavlova, described by Sarah Pethybridge as “a famous Australian and New Zealand dessert!”

Available for $14 or two for $25, proceeds from the cookbook sales will be used to support the Bike Share Program at the Geneva campus.  The SAGES Bike Share Program provides bicycles for rent to students and other members of the Geneva station community. Begun in 2014 with a few donated bicycles, the program has grown in the years since. Proceeds from cookbook sales will be used to expand the Bike Share Program by funding repairs of old bikes and purchasing of new ones.  Donations can also be made directly to the program.

Cookbooks are available in the SIPS main office at 135 Plant Science in Ithaca or in Hannah Swegarden’s mailbox in Hedrick Hall, Geneva.  Buy one soon and kick back with a piece of Larry Smart’s PhD Party Pie.  Filled with chocolate, pecans, Kahlua, and Jack Daniels, it’s the cure for whatever ails you!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Plant Sciences majors make trail improvements

trailhead

Taking advantage of a break in the rain showers Thursday afternoon, students in Collaboration, Leadership, and Career Skills in the Plant Sciences (PLSCI 1110) engaged in a service-learning project making improvements to the Habitat Trail outside of Trumansburg, N.Y.

In addition to clearing paths of vegetation and downed trees, teams of Plant Sciences majors erected a trailhead sign, assembled a picnic table, affixed identification tags to trees, and soaked in the beauty of the flora and fauna on the site. The activity was organized by Leah Cook, Plant Sciences major coordinator, and Marvin Pritts, director of undergraduate studies, who teach the course.

Students affixed identification tags to trees.

Students affixed identification tags to trees …

... cleared vegetation from the trail ...

… cleared vegetation from the trail …

... enjoyed the local fauna (in this case, jewelweed, Impatiens capensis) ...

… enjoyed the local fauna (in this case, jewelweed, Impatiens capensis) …

… and assembled a picnic table.

 

BioBlitz highlights region’s diversity

Scott LaGreca, left, curator of the Plant Pathology Herbarium, examines lichens retrieved from upper tree limbs by Nathaniel Farrington of Cornell Outdoor Education. Photo: Magdalen Lindeberg

Scott LaGreca, left, curator of the Plant Pathology Herbarium, examines lichens retrieved from upper tree limbs by Nathaniel Farrington of Cornell Outdoor Education. Photo: Magdalen Lindeberg

Reposted from CALS News [2017-09-04]:

Biodiversity is not just a feature of the Amazon rainforest or other exotic locales. Hidden multitudes of species inhabit the Ithaca region, as participants in the inaugural School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS) BioBlitz discovered Sept 8-9.

A dozen teams tallied 1,250 species of higher organisms and more than 23,000 microbes during the 24-hour event to document as many species as possible. Held on the grounds of the Cayuga Nature Center (CNC) and Smith Woods, the event was the first in the region. The series started in 1996 in Washington, D.C., and has since spread around the world.

The 2017 SIPS BioBlitz opened Sept. 8 with remarks by Chief Samuel George of the Cayuga Nation Bear Clan; Warren Allmon, director of the Paleontological Research Institution; and Kathryn J. Boor ’80, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

“At Cornell, it’s part of our jobs to be curious – which means I have one of the best jobs around,” Boor told participants at the launch of the event. “Like you, I’m inspired by what I can discover in the world around me, how to collect data and then share it with others.”

Boor and other speakers emphasized the importance of collaborations between universities and community members in preserving local lands and their biological diversity.

Read the whole article.

Art of Horticulture students create sod sofa

sod sofa

Taking advantage of the great weather this afternoon, students in the Art of Horticulture (HORT 2010) installed a crescent-shaped sod sofa in front of Fernow Hall on Tower Road. The experience is as much about building teamwork among the students as it is creating a living work of botanical art says  Marcia Eames-Sheavly, Senior Extension Associate and Senior Lecturer in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, who teaches the course.

“It’s got a great view of the sculpture in front of Fernow, alumni field and the hills beyond campus,” she says.

Frank Rossi, associate professor and turf specialist in the Horticulture Section, provided additional coaching, and shared lively guidance that ranged from the science of working with turf, to how to lay sod. Cornell Grounds Department collaborated to have the materials on site, and supported the work in numerous ways.

The sofa needs a few days to firm up and dry out. So best to test feel the sod with your hand before testing it out.

View pictures and video of previous sod sofa installations.

Shaping the compost and topsoil that make up the base of the sofa.

Shaping the compost and topsoil that make up the base of the sofa.

Frank Rossi, associate professor and turf specialist in the Horticulture Section

Frank Rossi, associate professor and turf specialist in the Horticulture Section coaches students in shaping the base.

Art of Horticulture students install sod over the base.

Art of Horticulture students install sod over the base.

Testing comfort after sod installation.

Testing comfort after sod installation.

Time lapse of the installation:

Seminar video: Plant Exploration in a Changing World

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Plant Exploration in a Changing World – Collecting in the 21st Century with Anthony Aiello, Director of Horticulture and Curator, Morris Arboretum, it is available online.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) Entrepreneur Conference Nov. 1-2

cea greensFrom Neil Mattson, Director, Cornell CEA and Associate Professor, Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science:

Do you have a serious interest in developing a business plan for a New York state based commercial CEA vegetable operation? This conference is for you.

Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) enables year-round production of fresh vegetables through greenhouse environmental control (heating, lighting) combined with hydroponic/soilless production systems. While CEA is an increasingly popular method of meeting consumer demand for locally grown food, many factors must be considered when developing a business plan and assessing its viability. This conference is intended to provide more detailed knowledge of CEA production systems, economics, marketing, and ways to access financing and state resources. It will also help guide new or transitioning operations through the process of developing a business plan for a CEA greenhouse vegetable business.

Read more about the conference and view the full agenda.

If you think this is for you, you’ll need to apply to attend. But if selected, the program is free. (You’ll need to cover travel and lodging expenses.)

Applications are due by September 29 and must be completed online here. If selected to attend you will be notified by October 3.

If you have questions, please contact me:  nsm47@cornell.edu

cea lighting system

Tour Brandywine Valley gardens with Pi Alpha Xi September 15-17

Leading the tour at Chanticleer will be the garden's public programs manager Erin McKeon, 2013 graduate of Cornell's Public Garden Management Program.

Leading the tour at Chanticleer will be the garden’s public programs manager Erin McKeon, 2013 graduate of Cornell’s Public Garden Management Program.

From Patricia Chan & Myles Collinson, Pi Alpha Xi co-presidents:

Feel the need to get off campus? The desire to surround yourselves with plants? The urge to learn the workings of a meticulously cultivated botanical garden?

Cornell University’s chapter of Pi Alpha Xi, the national honor society for horticulture and plant sciences, has organized a weekend trip to three southeast Pennsylvania public gardens September 15-17, featuring special behind-the-scenes tours at each location.:

This trip is open to all undergraduates, grad students, staff and faculty.

For only $50/person, this is a very affordable package trip that includes bus transportation to/from Ithaca, breakfasts, guided tours, and admission to the gardens.  Lunch and dinners are on-your-own, and hotel accommodations for two nights are available at a discounted rate. Important: You are responsible for booking your lodging, available for a special block rate, only if you make your hotel reservation by this Friday, 9/8.

Download trip details and registration form.

Questions? Contact Dr. Mark Bridgen, Advisor to Pi Alpha Xi, at mpb27@cornell.edu or 631-921-4941.

Inaugural SIPS BioBlitz Launches Sept. 8-9

The SIPS BioBlitz connects the public with scientists and students as they work together to count as many species as possible in a predetermined area for 24 hours.

The SIPS BioBlitz connects the public with scientists and students as they work together to count as many species as possible in a predetermined area for 24 hours.

Reposted from CALS News [2017-09-01]:

Nature enthusiasts of all ages are invited to the 2017 SIPS BioBlitz—an action-packed scientific endeavor, competition, festival and educational programming Sept. 8-9 at Cayuga Nature Center.

The free event from the School of Integrative Plant Science (SIPS) connects the public with scientists and students from local universities as they work together to count as many species as possible in a predetermined area for 24 hours. Participation for the event, which is the first of its kind in the area, is open to both students and local citizens.

Co-sponsored with the Cayuga Nature Center, the BioBlitz will include taxon-themed walks, demonstrations and educational programs for everyone, giving the public an opportunity to learn from scientists as they identify and catalog organisms. join the hunt for species, and use the iNaturalist app to upload their sightings to the species list. Admission is free to the Nature Center during the event.

“This is a great opportunity for people from all walks of life to get back to nature and learn about the amazing plants and animals in their own backyard,” says Scott LaGreca, SIPS BioBlitz coordinator and curator of the Cornell Plant Pathology Herbarium.

The opening ceremony will begin at 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 8, with remarks by Kathryn Boor, the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Christine Smart, professor of plant pathology and SIPS director; Warren Allmon, director of the Paleontological Research Institution; Elizabeth Thomas, Ulysses Town Supervisor; and Chief Samuel George, Cayuga Nation Bear Clan’s Sachem.

The BioBlitz starts at 5 p.m. on Friday as teams of scientists spread out across the Cayuga Nature Center’s grounds and nearby Smith Woods, one of the few old-growth forests left in the area, to take a census of everything from deer to microbes. Each team will have its headquarters at the Cayuga Nature Center, where members will show off their findings and answer questions from the public.

Schedule of Events

Friday, September 8

  • 4 p.m. – Opening Ceremonies
  • 5 p.m. – Start of BioBlitz!
  • 5-9 p.m. – Displays open in Nature Center
  • 5 p.m. – Interesting Fall Insects at the Nature Center
  • 6 p.m. – Snails and Slugs of the Forest
  • 7 p.m. – Nighttime Bat Extravaganza
  • 8 p.m. – Spiders by Flashlight
  • 9 p.m. – Moth Trapping and Nighttime Insects

Saturday, September 9

  • All Day – Taxa Tables displays and information
  • 10 a.m. – Native and Non-Native Plants and their Histories
  • 11 a.m. – Fungus Among Us Walk
  • Noon – Animal Feedings
  • 1 p.m. – Fun with Microbiology DNA
  • 2 p.m. – Walk with the Pollinators
  • 3 p.m. – Mapping Vegetation Using Drones
  • 5 p.m. – End of 24-hour BioBlitz collecting
  • 6 p.m. – Species tally announcement

More information can be found online. For questions, contact Scott LaGreca at bioblitz@cornell.edu or 607-255-2777.

 

Cornell-led project to improve grapes gets big boost

Bruce Reisch

Bruce Reisch

Cornell Chronicle [2017-08-31]

Breeding the next great grape is getting a boost thanks to new funding for a Cornell-led project that uses genomic technology to create varieties that are more flavorful and sustainable.

The project, VitisGen2, is a collaboration of 25 scientists from 11 institutions who are working in multidisciplinary teams to accelerate development of the next generation of grapes. Launched in 2011, the project was recently renewed with a $6.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

The work has the potential to save millions of dollars annually for the U.S. grape industry – in excess of $100 million in California alone, according to Bruce Reisch, professor of grapevine breeding and genetics in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), who co-leads the project with Lance Cadle-Davidson, plant pathologist with the USDA-ARS Grape Genetics Research Unit, both located at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

VitisGen2’s multipronged model addresses the grape production continuum. An economics team examines the benefits of improving grape varieties. Geneticists identify molecular markers for important traits in grapes, from resistance to diseases like powdery mildew to boosting low-temperature tolerance and fruit quality. Grape-breeding scientists develop new grape varieties that incorporate these traits, and teams of outreach specialists help growers and consumers understand the advantages of newly introduced grape varieties.

The result is a new generation of high-quality grapes that can be grown at lower cost and adapt easily to a range of geographic regions and climates, all with less environmental impact.

“We all stand to benefit in areas ranging from the environment to economic sustainability to improving the profit and quality possibilities for the industry,” Reisch said.

Read the whole article.

 

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