Skip to main content

Need produce? Get a Dilmun Hill Student Farm CSA share

From Erin Kehoe, CSA Coordinator, Dilmun Hill Student Farm:

CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture. Members pay at the start of the season for a share of the farm’s harvest and pick up vegetables once a week.

This season we will be offering a 12-week summer share that begins on Thursday, June 15th and ends on August 31st.  Shares will be picked up on the farm between 4 and 7.

We are offering two sizes this year:

  • A full share costs $350 and provides plenty of vegetables for a small family.
  • A half share costs $185 and provides half the amount of vegetables, which should be reasonable for an individual.

A limited number of “work of share” options are also available to students.

Interested? Have questions? Contact me at emk267@cornell.edu.

dilmun csa

 

Congratulations Class of 2017!


Dean Kathryn Boor and CALS Class of 2017 Degree Marshals Jeremy Pardo (Plant Sciences, left) and Nola Booth (Biology and Society, right) lead CALS graduates to Commencement ceremony at Schoellkopf Stadium May 28, 2017.

Plant Phenotyping Technologies mini-symposium videos

If you missed the May 16 mini-symposium Next Generation Plant Phenotyping Technologies, the talks are available online.

Speakers included:

  • Todd M. DeZwaan (LemnaTec Corporation): Phenotyping solutions for basic and applied research in plant biology and agriculture
  • Argelia Lorence (Department of Chemistry and Physics, Arkansas State University): Novel phenomic approaches for model and crop plants
  • Michael Gore (Plant Breeding and Genetics Section, SIPS, Cornell University): The great outdoors: the application of field-based phenotyping to improve crop resiliency
  • Chris Topp (Donald Danforth Plant Science Center): What’s going on in there: imaging technologies to understand the hidden parts of plants
  • Olena Vatamaniuk (Soil and Crop Sciences and Plant Biology Sections, SIPS, Cornell University): X-ray fluorescent microscopy imaging for studies of mineral nutrient homeostasis

Senior luncheon, symposium videos

On Thursday, May 18, some of the soon-to-be-graduating Plant Sciences Majors gathered for the annual ‘exit luncheon’ – an informal chance for them to share feedback about the program and make suggestions on how to improve the experience for future Majors.

Students were joined by SIPS Interim Director Chris Smart, Director of Undergraduate Studies Marvin Pritts, and  Plant Sciences Undergraduate Program Coordinator Leah Cook.

From the left: SIPS interim director Chris Smart, Zacky Ezedin, Jeremy Pardo, Lindsay Chamberlain, Lauren Fessler, Yoon Joo Lee, Nicholas Glynos, Karl Kunze, Benjamin Dillner, Director of Undergraduate Studies Marvin Pritts, and Plant Sciences Undergraduate Program Coordinator Leah Cook.

From the left: SIPS interim director Chris Smart, Zacky Ezedin, Jeremy Pardo, Lindsay Chamberlain, Lauren Fessler, Yoon Joo Lee, Nicholas Glynos, Karl Kunze, Benjamin Dillner, Director of Undergraduate Studies Marvin Pritts, and Plant Sciences Undergraduate Program Coordinator Leah Cook.

On Monday, May 15, several Plant Sciences Majors and others delivered presentations about their honors research at the first SIPS Senior Symposium. If you missed it, you can view them on the SIPS Senior Symposium YouTube playlist.

Björkman named ASHS fellow

Björkman

Björkman

From Horticulture Section chair Steve Reiners:

Please join me in congratulating our colleague, Thomas Björkman, for his being named a Fellow of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

Fellow is the highest honor that ASHS bestows on its members and recognizes truly outstanding contributions to the science, profession, or industry of horticulture.

Thomas will be honored at the upcoming ASHS Conference in Hawaii later this year.

Congratulations Thomas.

Hortus Forum Bedding Plant Sale May 19-20

Get your garden off to a running start this spring. Purchase vegetable and flower transplants as well as hanging baskets at Hortus Forum‘s Bedding Plant Sale, May 19 3-6pm & May 20 10-5pm at Kenneth Post Lab Greenhouses.

May 19 3-6pm & May 20 10-5pm Kenneth Post Laboratories   Veggie Starters:  Cabbage, Swiss Chard, Eggplant, Peppers, Tomato, Parsley, Cilantro, Basil, Watermelon    Garden Flowers:  Marigold, Lupine, Zinnia, Snapdragon,  Gomphrena, Cosmos, Pansy, Alyssum,  Amaranth, Asclepias, Sunflower, Lisianthus, Select Hanging Baskets   More info, email: hortusforum@gmail.com

Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, cultivates a positive community that fosters a passion for plants and teaches the value of horticulture.

Congrats undergrads!

Jeremy Pardo and Nola Booth received the CALS Class of 2017 Degree Marshal awards from Dean Boor. Photo by Chris Kitchen / University Marketing.

Jeremy Pardo and Nola Booth received the CALS Class of 2017 Degree Marshal awards from Dean Boor. (Photo: Chris Kitchen / University Marketing)

It’s award season, and many Plant Sciences majors have received  recent recognitions, including:

Research support specialist Ed Cobb (left) and Professor Karl Niklas present Glynos with his Young Botanist award in the Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory.

Research support specialist Ed Cobb (left) and Professor Karl Niklas present Glynos with his Young Botanist award in the Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory.

Seminar video: Light Matters – Sensing and Signaling in Plants

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Light Matters – Sensing and Signaling in Plants   with Tessa Pocock, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, it is available online.

 

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

In the news: Seed to Supper, hard cider course, ag career day

hofo plant sale

From University Photo’s May 2 Picture Cornell feature: Hortus Forum member Patty Chan helps a customer at the club’s plant sale on Ho Plaza at Spring Fest on April 20. The club will have a bedding plant sale featuring vegetable and flower transplants May 19 from 3 to 6 p.m. and May 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Kenneth Post Laboratories. (Photo: Jason Koski/University Photograph)

A roundup of recent news:

Seed to Supper Connects Students with the Community – Marcia Eames-Sheavly’s Seed to Supper two-semester course sequence is part of a statewide Seed to Supper initiative that connects Cornell Cooperative Extension offices with local food banks and volunteer educators who teach adults on a limited budget how to garden and grow their own food, thereby creating more food-secure communities.[CALS News 2017-05-02, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-02]

As presenter at the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day, Larry Smart, associate professor of plant breeding and genetics, showed high school students some of the tools he uses in his research at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

As presenter at the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day, Larry Smart, associate professor of plant breeding and genetics, showed high school students some of the tools he uses in his research at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York.

Agriculture Career Day Exposes Teens to Diverse Fields – From dairy robotics and precision farming technology to the chemistry of wine making and integrated pest management, jobs in agriculture dot a diverse and varied career map in the Finger Lakes. Helping area high school students navigate ag-related vocational opportunities was the goal of the 2017 Building the Agricultural Intellect of the Finger Lakes Youth Career Day April 26. [CALS News 2017-05-04, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-04]

Course teaches hard cider production, from fruit to fermentation – To prepare students to become leaders in the burgeoning cider industry, Gregory Peck, assistant professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science.and Kathleen Arnink, lecturer in the viticulture and enology program in the Department of Food Science, initiated a cider production lecture and laboratory course. The first of its kind in the country, the course teaches the full cycle of production, from growing apples to fermenting cider. [CALS News 2017-05-04, Cornell Chronicle 2017-05-02]

students in pounder

In Cornell Botanic Gardens’ Pounder Vegetable Garden, gardener Emily Detrick (left, MPS Public Garden Leadership ’16) shows Organic Vegetable Gardening (PLHRT 1250) students how to use fabric row covers to protect young crops from insect pests. Horticulture chair Steve Reiners teaches the course.

Skip to toolbar