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Greenhouse/High Tunnel Vegetable IPM webinars start February 9

high tunnel tomatoes

From Betsy Lamb, NYS Integrated Pest Management Program:

We will be holding a series of short webinars on Greenhouse/High Tunnel Vegetable IPM on Thursdays from 12-1 in February and March.  The intent is for each topic to be briefly covered and then followed by discussion:

  • Feb 9 and Feb 16: Basics of light, water fertility, media as they relate to pest management
  • Feb 23: Vegetable crop production in greenhouses and high tunnels
  • Mar 2: Disease management in greenhouses and high tunnels
  • Mar 9: Insect management in greenhouses and high tunnels
  • Mar 16: Weed management in greenhouses and high tunnels, especially in winter production
  • Mar 23: How to write/use an IPM plan

All webinars will be delivered via Zoom and recorded in case you can’t attend in person. During the week of April 24 we will hold a training session in Geneva to follow up on these webinars.

For more information, contact me:  eml38@cornell.edu

 

Seminar video: Ethnobotany of the southern plains

If you missed Monday’s Horticulture Section seminar Ethnobotany of the southern plains  with Wayne Elisens, Oklahoma Biological Survey, it  is available online.

Zoom version (sharper slides) also available.

More seminar videos: Horticulture | School of Integrative Plant Science

Water sensor moves from basic research to promising business

A sensor installed in the trunk of a grapevine. After the installation of the sensor, the researchers cover and insulate the trunk.

A sensor installed in the trunk of a grapevine. After the installation of the sensor, the researchers cover and insulate the trunk. (Photo: Alan Lakso)

Cornell Chronicle [2017-02-06]:

A water sensor technology that began as basic research at Cornell is blooming into a business that fills a vital need for grape, nut, apple and other growers.

While current water sensing tools are expensive, inaccurate or labor intensive, the new sensor tells growers when their plants need irrigation with accurate, real-time readings at reasonable cost.

Much like a blood pressure gauge for humans, the sensor reads the water pressure inside the plant. When plants are thirsty, their water pressure is low, sometimes even negative. The sensor reads this pressure inside the plant to help growers ensure plant health and optimize water use in drought-stricken agricultural areas. Applying water at the right time can also greatly improve the quality of fruits, nuts and especially grapes for red wines.

In mid-2016, Cornell engineers and horticulturalists who developed the sensor launched FloraPulse, a startup aimed at commercializing the sensor and using it to provide agricultural services. The first target markets are grape and nut growers in California’s Central and Napa valleys.

Read the whole article.

Historic Cornell trip explores new frontiers in Myanmar

A farmer on Inle Lake in Myanmar explains hydroponic tomato farming methods to Cornell and Burmese students. (Photo: Emma Quilligan)

A farmer on Inle Lake in Myanmar explains hydroponic tomato farming methods to Cornell and Burmese students. (Photo: Emma Quilligan)

Cornell Chronicle [2017-01-30]:

For the first time, 29 students in the International Agriculture in Developing Nations course had the opportunity to undertake a field study tour of Myanmar Jan. 1-16. It was the 49th class trip, through which students have visited Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Costa Rica, Honduras and India.

“We decided to go to Myanmar this year because of the enormous changes underway in the country,” said Ronnie Coffman, international professor of plant breeding at Cornell and director of International Programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. “Agriculture plays an important part in this emerging economy, and this trip enabled students to see, firsthand, the challenges and opportunities faced by farmers.”

The group surveyed a range of agroecologies and production environments, traveling throughout the central dry zone, Inle Lake and Ayerwaddy Delta. Meetings with farmers gave students insight into various cultivation systems, from hydroponic tomato farming to small-scale melon production, while visits to agribusinesses highlighted the increasing trade and knowledge exchanges between Myanmar and its neighbors. The group also learned about alternative livelihoods, such as lotus weaving and lacquerware manufacturing, and engaged in Myanmar culture with visits to pagodas, temples and traditional puppet shows.

Read the whole article.

Marvin Pritts, Horticulture Section Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Plant Sciences Major was among the Cornell faculty leading the trip.

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