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Orchards, Plantations interns visit NYSAES

From Marvin Pritts, Horticulture Section chair:

Last Monday, 15 interns from Cornell Plantations and Cornell Orchards visited the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y., to learn more about the research conducted there, including the berry, grape and apple breeding programs and the USDA germplasm repository. Interns also toured the food science processing plant, walked the station grounds to learn about the landscaping, and were joined for lunch by about 20 summer interns from the experiment station.

Cornell Orchards and Cornell Plantations interns sample  berries growing in high tunnels at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y., June 30.

Cornell Orchards and Cornell Plantations interns sample berries growing in high tunnels at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y., June 30.

 

Rebuilding NYSAES for generations to come!

Reposted from Station News [2014-06-30]:

nysaes greenhouse exteriorDemolition began this week on the Old Range Greenhouses, as contractors continue with the $4.7 million greenhouse renovation at the Station. Once completed, the multi-year project funded by the state will result in the reconstruction of 21,000 square feet of greenhouses that were originally built from the mid-1950s to the early 1970s. The new, state-of-the-art facilities feature new glass, increased eave heights, improved lighting, retractable shade curtains, and upgraded cooling and climate controls, all of which not only improve research capacity, but also optimize energy efficiency.

nysaes greenhouse interiorIn addition to enhancing the capacity for path-breaking research in plant breeding, plant pathology and entomology at the Station, the new greenhouses also improve educational opportunities for more than 50 graduate and undergraduate students who use the facilities, as well as outreach programs designed to engage elementary and high school students.

The project joins several other recent, high-profile investments in the future excellence of the Station, including a new $3.4 million award to the Northeast Center for Food Entrepreneurship, new funding from the state for hops and malting barley research, and new faculty lines from CALS to be awarded at the successful conclusion of the Station’s strategic planning process.

Journey to Machu Picchu travelogue July 9

From Marvin Pritts, Horticulture Section chair:

I’d like to invite you to a lunchtime presentation July 9 at noon in PS 114 where I will share experiences about my recent trip to Peru.

I am calling it a “Journey to Machu Picchu” because it involved four days of spiritual preparation (ceremony, meditation, reflection) with an old Inca guide at several sacred archeological sites before arriving at Machu Picchu at sunrise on the winter solstice. On the winter solstice the sun rises through a notch in the mountains and strikes the temple, causing it to glow in the morning sun.

Other highlights include terraces made with rocks weighing more than 100 tons that fit together perfectly, intricate Incan irrigation systems, stunning scenery, beautiful fabrics and interesting foods.

The winter solstice is also cause for a week of celebrations, dancing and parades in Cusco – the ancient Incan capital city. I will also share some videos of extreme ziplining between mountains, hundreds of feet above the ground.

I hope to see you there.

machu picchu

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