Larry Smart answers questions from attendees inside the willow chip drying barn. It takes about 70 to 100 tons of willow for the boiler to produce enough heat for the winter season. Sarah Thompson photo.

Larry Smart answers questions from attendees inside the willow chip drying barn. It takes about 70 to 100 tons of willow for the boiler to produce enough heat for the winter season. Sarah Thompson photo.

From the Cornell Chronicle [12/21/2012]:

Nearly 60 participants representing every corner of the emerging biomass energy market — from potential growers to manufacturers of harvesting and biomass heating equipment — attended a willow biomass heating and biofuels workshop December 18 at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station (NYSAES) in Geneva, N.Y.

The program covered all aspects of growing, harvesting and using shrub willow and other perennial woody crops as a renewable fuel for heating.

“It’s important to close the loop and connect researchers with end users,” said Larry Smart, associate professor of horticulture, head of Cornell’s willow breeding program. “I’m always impressed by innovative facilities managers who stick out their necks to adopt new energy systems. Their persistence and dedication are often what’s most important to a project’s success.”

Read the whole article.

See also 10/23/2012 Associated Press story, Energy from willows comes of age in upstate NY,

For more shrub willow biofuel information from Cornell, visit Willowpedia.

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