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CALS News: Hort Is Hot!

The Department of Horticulture is featured in the Spring 2011 issue of CALS News

The Department of Horticulture is featured in the Spring 2011 issue of CALS News

The Department of Horticulture is featured in Hort Is Hot!‘ in the spring 2011 issue of CALS News. The article profiles some of the ‘hot’ projects in the department, including Thomas Bjorkman’s East Coast broccoli project, David Wolfe’s climate change work, Taryn Bauerle’s use of CT imaging to study roots, and Jenny Kao-Kniffin’s work developing weed-suppressive landscapes.

If you read the article and are looking for follow-up links on these projects and the other innovative work listed in the sidebar, here they are:

Main story:

Sidebar:

  • Cornell Orchards — a working orchard complete with a sales room adjacent to campus — “constantly reminds us that our work is closely tied to consumers,” says department chair Marvin Pritts.
  • Urban Eden students plan and plant landscapes around campus every spring, applying what they’ve learned about trees and shrubs in class. Some students join SWAT teams (Student Weekend Arborist Teams) to help cities and towns inventory their street trees.
  • Distance learning courses for the general public in organic gardening, plant propagation, botanical illustration, and how to get started in farming provide the best of hands-on and online learning.
  • Vegetable Varieties for Gardeners website is a popular citizen science project that helps people decide what to grow. Visitors can create garden profiles to showcase their gardens, review varieties, and communicate with each other on Facebook.
  • Willowpedia is a new website focusing on use of shrub willows as a sustainable feedstock crop for biofuels and other products.
  • The Nature of Plants instructor Taryn Bauerle teams with Cornell Outdoor Education to expose freshmen to plant biology while they climb and hang from ropes in mature forest trees.
  • Food donations to local food banks and pantries from the Thompson Vegetable Research Farm in Freeville and other facilities topped 1 million pounds since 2004.
  • Viticulture and enology majors design management plans for the organic vineyard at Cornell Orchards during spring semester, carry out the plan during summer internships, and make wines from the grapes in fall. (More on sustainable wine at Cornell.)
  • A 2010 study by the National Research Council ranks Cornell’s Graduate Field of Horticulture second out of the 18 horticulture programs in the plant science category.
  • Experiential Garden-Based Learning in Belize course sends teams of students and extension educators to demonstrate how gardens can enrich school curricula. View video.
  • Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, raises money for educational field trips by growing and selling poinsettias and other plants on campus.
  • The Turfgrass Program uses weekly podcasts to help lawn, golf, and athletic turf professionals reduce their environmental impact.
  • The Cornell Small Farms Program, housed in the department, reaches more than 27,000 farmers with its Small Farm Quarterly in collaboration with Lee Publishing.

Willow-planting demo cancelled due to wet conditions

May 24 event cancelled due to wet conditions.

willow plantingNote new date, postponed to May 24 due to rain.

Larry Smart will be hosting a Willow Zone Tillage and GPS-Guided Planting Demonstration.

Date: Thursday May 19 24, 2011
Time: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Rain date: Tuesday, May 24
Location:
Crittenden North Farm
NYS Agricultural Experiment Station
Corner of Cty Rd 4 and Cty Rd 6
Geneva, NY

Registration and driving directions.

Questions or more info: contact:
Dr. Larry Smart
Dept. of Horticulture
Cornell University
NYS Agricultural Experiment Station
Phone: 315.787.2490
Email: lbs33@cornell.edu

Program:

Intro to Shrub Willow Crops

Zone tillage and GPS guidance

Planting demo: 4-row Egedal planter

Planting demo: new 2-row STEP planter

View rain date poster.

Friends of Long Island Horticulture 2011 Grant Recipients

From Mark Bridgen, director of the Long Island Horticulture Research and Extension Center.

This year $19,065 in grants was awarded for 9 different research projects:

  • Efficacy of cultural control measures for Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria spp.) on California Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). Alexis Alvey and Margery Daughtrey.
  • Effectiveness of the insect-parasitic nematode, Steinernema Feltiae, for control of Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella Occidentalis. Nora Catlin and Daniel Gilrein.
  • Identifying the best cut-flower lilies for Long Island farm stands. Margery Daughtrey and Mark Bridgen.
  • A Victory Garden demonstration at the LIHREC. Jane Foster and the Cornell Gardeners.
  • Testing the phytotoxicity of organic and minimum-risk insecticides labeled for organic use on woody ornamentals. Dan Gilrein.
  • Tillage radish: a new cover crop for Long Island growers. Sandra Menasha.
  • Monitoring resistance to fungicides and impact on control of Cucurbit Powdery Mildew to guide fungicide recommendations and support section 18 request. Margaret McGrath.
  • Evaluating disease resistant tomato varieties. Margaret McGrath.
  • Investigating impact on management of pathogen adaptation to powdery mildew resistance in melon, pumpkin, and squash. Margaret McGrath.

The Friends of Long Island Horticulture was organized in 1993 by individuals in the New York horticulture industry to raise funds that are greatly needed to support the research and educational efforts of Cornell University’s Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center (LIHREC) and the Cornell Cooperative Extension. To date, through the generosity of many ‘Friends’, more than $427,000 has been awarded through the competitive grant process.

In 2010, Friends of Long Island Horticulture awarded $28,190 to 13 different projects.

Special seminar May 23: The Power of Plants – Eden Project and Beyond

Jane McKnight and the Eden Project

Jane McKnight and the Eden Project

The Power of Plants – Eden Project and Beyond
Lecture by Jane Knight, Landscape Architect for the Eden Project, UK
Monday, May 23rd 2011, 12-1:15pm
Room 233, Plant Science Building, Tower Road, Cornell University

Cornell alumnus, Ms. Jane Knight (MLA ’86), Chartered Member of the UK Landscape Institute will speak on her international career journey, her involvement in developing the Eden Project in a disused clay mine in Cornwall, UK, and how Eden’s outreach projects are improving people’s lives around the world. Eden Project is a hugely successful UK horticultural tourist destination, educational charity and social enterprise.

Sponsored by the Horticulture Department’s Seminar Series. This event if free and open to everyone.

For more information contact:
Dr. Neil Mattson
Phone: 607-255-0621
E-mail: nsm47@cornell.edu

Hortus Forum final plant sale Friday

Hortus Forum, Cornell’s undergraduate horticulture club, will have it’s final plant sale of the year, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday May 13 at KPL greenhouses. View map.

hofo plant sale

Willow-planting demo May 24

willow plantingNote new date, postponed to May 24 due to rain.

Larry Smart will be hosting a Willow Zone Tillage and GPS-Guided Planting Demonstration.

Date: Thursday May 19 24, 2011
Time: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Rain date: Tuesday, May 24
Location:
Crittenden North Farm
NYS Agricultural Experiment Station
Corner of Cty Rd 4 and Cty Rd 6
Geneva, NY

Registration and driving directions.

Questions or more info: contact:
Dr. Larry Smart
Dept. of Horticulture
Cornell University
NYS Agricultural Experiment Station
Phone: 315.787.2490
Email: lbs33@cornell.edu

Program:

Intro to Shrub Willow Crops

Zone tillage and GPS guidance

Planting demo: 4-row Egedal planter

Planting demo: new 2-row STEP planter

View rain date poster.

New online course: Teaching and learning in school gardens

Teaching and Learning in the School Garden: Theory into Practice is a new online course that focuses on the foundations and teaching strategies of garden-based learning (GBL), and provides the tools and resources that classroom teachers and extension educators need to develop school gardening programs that integrate into the school curriculum.

The class runs from June 27, 2011 to August 26, 2011, and will be taught by Donna Alese Cooke, Community Educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rockland County.

Also offered this summer are two online botanical illustration courses starting June 6: Basic Drawing Techniques and Working With Watercolor.

Visit the Horticulture distance learning course website to learn more about these and other courses including organic gardening, plant propagation and garden design. The Cornell Beginning Farmers project also offers several online courses that will resume this fall.

Thomas Björkman goes to Washington

Photos courtesy of Jonathan Moore, Public Affairs Consultant

Thomas Björkman, associate professor in the Department of Horticulture, traveled to Washington, D.C., May 10 as part of a delegation representing the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS). The group visited Capitol Hill and U.S. Department of Agriculture to educate legislators and staff about the need for continued funding of horticultural research and extension in the FY12 budget and the next Farm Bill.

“There is a passion for budget cutting in Washington today, a passion that makes it essential for these decision makers to understand the immense value taxpayers get from investments in horticultural research and extension,” says Björkman. “Horticulture improves everyone’s life every day, but few realize how much research and extension is needed for that to happen.”

Beachy and Bjorkman
Björkman (right), chair of ASHS’s National Issues Task Force, thanks Roger Beachy, outgoing director of USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, for his service to agricultural research.

Bjorkman and McBride
In the hearing room of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Björkman (left) makes a point with Stacy McBride, Minority Staff Clerk for the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee.

Beachy and Woteki
ASHS members meet with USDA Undersecretary for Research, Education and Economics, Dr. Catherine Wotecki, and outgoing NIFA Director. Dr. Roger Beachy.

In the People's Garden
Björkman inspects pea plot at the People’s Garden outside USDA Headquarters.

In the news

Glen Evans, new director of agricultural operations for the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES)

Glen Evans, new director of agricultural operations for the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES)

Some recent articles of horticulture interest:

April showers bring May glowers from N.Y. growers – In this May 3 Cornell Chronicle story, Amanda Garris describes how April’s record-setting, twice-normal rainfall is affecting farmers.

Symposium briefs 4-H educators on engaging youth in citizen science – May 4 Cornell Chronicle story about how 4-H is engaging science-savvy youth in citizen science projects, including the Garden-based Learning Program‘s Vegetable Varieties Investigation citizen science project.

New director of experiment station’s ag operations focuses on sustainability – May 10 Cornell Chronicle article profiles Glen Evans ’03, M.S. ’07, Ph.D. ’10, new director of agricultural operations for the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station (CUAES) and former research support specialist in Robin Bellinder’s weed science program.

Sustainable, no-till, ag practices worked very well for Iroquois 500 years ago – May 9 article in Farm and Ranch Guide reports on Jane Mt. Pleasant‘s work documenting the high productivity of Native American farming systems.

May 2011 Alumni Newsletter

May 2011 Dept. of Horticulture Alumni News

May 2011 Dept. of Horticulture Alumni News

The May 2011 Dept. of Horticulture Alumni Newsletter is now online.

Enjoy!

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