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Oct. 6 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #5

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • Viticulture in Japan (Walter-Peterson)
  • Fruit Composition Report 9/25/2017 (Weigle, Walter-Peterson, Gerling, Wise, Meyers)
  • Soil Profile in Vineyard at Ikeda, Japan (Walter-Peterson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

Sept. 29 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #4

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • Dr. Strangelove II or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Drone (Meyers)
  • Fruit Composition Report 9/25/2017 (Weigle, Walter-Peterson, Gerling, Wise, Meyers)
  • Grapevine Sphinx Moth found at Ravines Vineyards (photo, Martinson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

Sept. 22 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #3

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • 2017 Concord  Berry Curve (Bates)
  • MP Promises: The 2017 Growing Season from a Methoxypyrazine Perspective (Gerling)
  • A Little-Known Grape Insect: Grapeleaf Skeletonizer (photo, Martinson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

Cornell Small Farms Program offers Berry Production distance learning course

If you’re exploring the idea of adding berries and bramble fruits to your farm, this course will help you consider all the aspects of this decision, from varieties and site selection all the way through profit potential and marketing.

Upon completion of this course, which starts November 7, you will understand:

  • Primary considerations when choosing a site for successful berry farming
  • Basic cultural demands of the 3 major berry crops (strawberry, blueberry and brambles)
  • Cultural requirements of an array of lesser known berry crops
  • Pest complexes of the major berry crops
  • Post-harvest requirements of berries
  • Considerations for successful marketing of berry crops
  • How to analyze costs vs. expenses and be able to incorporate them into a business plan

The bulk of the course happens on your own time, with discussions, readings, and assignments in MOODLE, our virtual classroom. To add to the experience, webinars will be woven into the online interface of the course to allow you to meet on a weekly basis to learn from outside presenters and ask questions to address your farm issues in real time. If you miss a webinar, they are always recorded and posted for later viewing.

The Instructors are Laura McDermott, team leader and regional fruit and vegetable specialist for Cornell Cooperative Extension of Eastern NY, and Jim O’Connell, the small fruits educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension in Ulster County, NY.

More information | More Small Farms Program online courses

Growers in pursuit of precision agriculture

Mario Miranda Sazo

Mario Miranda Sazo

From Good Fruit Grower [2017-09-19]:

As New York growers seek to expand fresh market production of high quality fruit, they are looking for ways to maximize performance of high-density apple plantings and recoup the investments of new orchards faster.

Luckily, Cornell University researchers continue to learn how to optimize horticultural practices in the region’s signature tall-spindle systems, and they shared their findings on irrigation, nutrition and chemical thinning with growers at a summer field day at five farms in the Lake Ontario fruit belt.

Although it’s been a wet season so far, growers haven’t forgotten the drought of the previous year, with losses of 47 percent for those without irrigation, according to a Cornell study.

More growers are investing in irrigation systems said Mario Miranda Sazo, extension educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Lake Ontario Fruit Program.

“When I came here in 2009 and started talking about irrigation, you all said, ‘You don’t know our weather here,’” Miranda Sazo joked with the tour group. “But we should be putting irrigation on these new plantings and little by little, growers are installing it. You have to baby-sit these trees from the get-go.”

Read the whole article.

Cornell Orchards Apple Spectacular October 1

Sunday, October 1, 2017
1:00pm to 5:00pm
Cornell Orchards, 701 Dryden Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850

Come join the Cornell Orchards Store, Cornell Catering, and the Cornell Hard Cider Program Work Team for a family friendly Finger Lakes Cider Week event celebrating all things apples and cider!

Cornell is a leader in hard cider research and outreach, and even teaches an undergraduate course on hard cider production!  We will have a wide selection of specialized cider apple varieties available for tasting and participants can create their own cider blends using freshly pressed apple juice.

Starting at 1:00PM and 3:00PM, The Peck Lab will lead walking tours of high-density cider apple research orchards. There will also be hard cider tastings from local producers along with delicious food pairings, and of course plenty of apples and sweet cider from Cornell’s research farms to purchase and take home.

Map, more information.

Sept. 15 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #2

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • 2017 Concord  Berry Curve (Bates)
  • Navigating sour rot risk: Drosophila, Yellow Jackets, Insecticides, and Microbials (Martinson, Wilcox, Loeb)
  • More Fruit Flies on Grapes (photos, Martinson)
  • Please Participate in Our Online NEWA Survey (Olmstead)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

New issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #1

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Trimber,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • CLEREL Lake Erie Concord Berry Curve (Bates)
  • The What, How, and Why of Sample Analysis (Gerling)
  • Fruit Composition Report 9/5/2017 (Team) – First full set of samples
  • Please Participate in Our Online NEWA Survey (Olmstead)
  • Photos of NY98.0228.02 seedless concord-type table grape (Reisch & Martinson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

New issue of Appellation Cornell available online

Featured in the August 31, 2017 issue:

Berry Crops Field Workshop August 29, Stephentown, NY

Come and learn from experts!

  • Dr. Greg Loeb, Cornell
  • Dr. Juliet Carroll, NYS IPM and  NEWA
  • Dale Ila Riggs, The Berry Patch
  • Laura McDermott, CCE ENYCHP

This workshop will cover the following topics:

  • Plasticulture strawberry production for June berries and Day Neutral
  • Low tunnels on strawberries
  • High tunnel raspberry production
  • Exclusion netting to control SWD in blueberries
  • Using computer models to improve pest management of berry crops
  • Collaboration between NEWA and NYS Mesonet

More information.

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