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March 2018 issue of Appellation Cornell

Appellation Cornell​​
News from Cornell’s Viticulture and Enology Program
March 2018

In this issue:

Grape Pest Management Strategic Plan for the Northeast Released

Grapes are an important established crop in New York, Pennsylvania, and portions of New Jersey; they also are an emerging and expanding crop in southern portions of the Northeast region such as Maryland and throughout the New England states, where the introduction of new cold-tolerant cultivars now allows production in regions where low winter temperatures previously precluded cultivation of this crop. Grapes have become particularly popular in these new regions because they can provide growers opportunities with value-added wine production and unique agritourism offerings. The expansion of grape production into regions where there is little experience with this crop or extension infrastructure dedicated to its support entails an additional set of challenges for new growers.

A diverse stakeholder group of Northeast growers, researchers, organic association technical personnel, IPM practitioners and extension specialists were gathered to develop a Northeast Grape PMSP that accurately reflects the current insect, weed, and disease problems in Northeast grapes and the IPM management strategies for those pests. Prior to the 2016 Grape PMSP meeting participants were asked to list the key pests, diseases, and weeds in order of importance in grape. This survey was substituted as a cost?effective and efficient replacement for a Crop Profile and Survey. The list of key pests for grape included three insects, five diseases, and the weeds and vertebrates common in agricultural settings. The key pests are typically persistent problems that need to be managed every year.

Of special note, there are other current and emerging pests that annually affect the crop to lesser degrees but can be damaging when outbreaks occur. The impact of direct damage from Spotted Wing Drosophila is still being assessed but awareness of potential threat is high and there is an educational need for management decision knowledge and planning. Anthracnose and Crown Gall occurrences are increasing. There is a need for research to increase understanding of biology and management of these diseases as well as for Trunk Dieback and Sour Rot complexes.

This PMSP addresses all grapes grown in the Northeast region: interspecific hybrid cultivars, including the new cold-climate varieties used for wine and table grape production; Vitis vinifera cultivars that form the backbone of the premium-wine segment of the industry; and V. labrusca-based “native” cultivars, used for unfermented grape products, traditional sweeter wines, and table use. In addition to providing an in-depth educational opportunity for those participating in the development of the PMSP, the group also identified critical priorities that can be used to develop a plan for future research, extension, and regulatory needs for grapes in the Northeast.

Download:  Pest Management Strategic Plan for Grapes in the Northeast 2017.

Special Issue of Appellation Cornell

Appellation Cornell​​
News from Cornell’s Viticulture and Enology Program
November 27, 2017

As 2017 comes to a close, we are seeing the simultaneous retirement of three key faculty members involved in grape pest management research and extension at Cornell’s New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.  Collectively, Tom Burr,Wayne Wilcox and Andrew Landers represent 91 years of expertise in research and extension at Cornell.  Each of them has written a Research Focus article outlining some of the key accomplishments of their programs.   They can all be proud of their accomplishments that have significantly benefitted the industry here in New York – and have had a global impact on the science of disease management in grapes and spray technology.

-Tim Martinson and Chris Gerling, co-editors

Contents  includes:

Cornell Recent Advances in Viticulture and Enology (CRAVE) videoconference Nov. 14

From Tim Martinson:

You are invited to the annual CRAVE (Cornell Recent Advances in Viticulture and Enology) conference featuring 15-minute presentations by Cornell faculty, extension associates, and graduate students on current extension and research topics of their choice.   For this year’s conference, we would like to invite you to log on for as little or as much time as you want to hear cutting-edge presentations about viticulture, enology, economics and more. Find out what Cornell Research and Extension faculty and staff have been up to this past year.

Available by Zoom:
Topic: CRAVE
Time: Nov 14, 2017 8:30 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://cornell.zoom.us/j/648376762
Or Skype for Business (Lync): https://cornell.zoom.us/skype/648376762

Program (click for larger view):

program

November 6 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #9

  • T.G.I. Fall:  A Recap of the 2017 Growing Season (Gerling, Walter-Peterson, Cornell Extension Enology Laboratory Advisory Council)
  • Concord Harvest is a Wrap in the Lake Erie Region (Martin)
  • Fruit Chemistry Trends 2013-2017 (Martinson)
  • Thanks to Our Funders
  • The Crew

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

Fall 2017 issue of New York Berry News is available online

  Volume 16, Number 3 – Fall 2017

In this issue:

  • Exclusion Netting to Combat SWD
  • Lyme Disease: Ticks and the Diseases They Carry
  • “How to”: Berry Diseases
  • New Farmers Grant Fund Program
  • Growing frustration about the weather: What can we do?
  • SWD Webinars
  • Rainfall Survey
  • NEWA Survey and Berry Models
  • Organic Fruit Sales Surge 12%
  • Utilizing Plasticulture
  • Berry Production Course
  • High Tunnel Raspberry and Blackberry Guide
  • Root Weevils in Berries
  • SWD: Year in Review

Visit the revamped Cornell Berry Resources website to view back issues and more.

Oct. 27 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #8

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • Fruit Composition Report 10/23/2017 (Weigle, Walter-Peterson, Gerling, Wise, Meyers)
  • Vineyard-Scale Mechanized Leaf Removal Reduced Fruit Rot in Pinot Gris (Martinson & Chen)
  • Census of Agriculture Coming in December (Martinson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

Oct. 20 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #7

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • Fruit Composition Report 10/16/2017 (Weigle, Walter-Peterson, Gerling, Wise, Meyers)
  • Insects feeding on Riesling Clusters at NYSAES (Martinson)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

The Emerging Industry of Hard Cider

Greg Peck

Greg Peck

From Cornell Research website:

From the earliest days of the American colonies, hard cider was a common staple. European settlers brought their cider-making skills with them, along with apple cultivars especially suited to the process. Yet, after prohibition ended in 1933, cider making in the United States was all but forgotten—until now. “Since 2011 the growth of the cider industry has been astronomical,” says Gregory M. Peck, School of Integrative Plant Science, Horticulture. “There’s been more than a 900 percent increase in the volume of cider produced in the U.S. New York has more individual producers than any other state in the country. Right now, we have about 85, and that number is growing constantly. I’m always getting emails and calls for help from new businesses.”

Peck is perhaps the foremost scientific expert in the country on cider apples and cider making. He is at the forefront of the cider renaissance and a large part of his research revolves around this emerging industry. “Cider apple growers and producers need a lot of technical support,” he says. “They need research to help them figure out which cultivars make the best cider, how to grow them, how to harvest them, how to store them. Those are the questions I’m trying to answer for the industry.”

Read the whole article.

Oct. 13 issue of Veraison to Harvest available online

2017 Veraison to Harvest #6

  • Around New York  (Martinson, Walter-Peterson,  Weigle, Wise, Meyers )
  • Potassium Deficiency in Concord Vineyards (Bates, Jakubowski, & Dresser)
  • What Happens When You Completely Defoliate a Riesling Vine at Fruit Set?  (Martinson)
  • Fruit Composition Report 10/9/2017 (Weigle, Walter-Peterson, Gerling, Wise, Meyers)
  • Vinification and Brewing Lab Moves to Temporary Digs (Gerling)

Veraison to Harvest is a weekly electronic newsletter put out by viticulture and enology extension personnel from Lake Erie, Long Island, the Hudson Valley and the Finger Lakes. Each issue provides accurate and up-to-date regional data while giving a statewide perspective as well. V to H begins in early September and concludes in late October.

View back issues.

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