Category Archives: Events

Upcoming or past events

“Adaptation Inspiration” video highlights communities becoming resilient to sea-level rise

The Climate Program at the Hudson River Estuary Program has produced a short video “Sea-level rise: planning coastal development” highlighting how the City of Kingston and residents of Piermont are adapting to sea-level rise and coastal flooding. The second offering in the “Adaptation Inspiration” series, this video reviews the causes of sea level rise and showcases the positive approaches with which these communities are adapting to this consequence of climate change. Thank you to filmmakers Laura and Mustafa at Flicker Filmworks! Visit the climate program’s webpage on climate resilience case studies to learn more about flood-adaptive planning efforts.

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Streams 101 – Infrastructure Impacts Presentation

On Saturday, November 4th, Resiliency Project staff led a training for local municipal and highway staff on stream basics, flood resilience measures, and the potential impacts on stormwater on municipal infrastructure.

Here is the slide presentation from that training:

Click here for a Hudson Valley 360 press article on the training!

For questions or more information, please contact Tracey Testo at CCE Columbia-Greene at 518-622-9820 x41 or tet35@cornell.edu.

 

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Upcoming Training! “Stream Assessment and Troubleshooting”

“How to evaluate and problem-solve your stream-road trouble spots using USGS StreamStats and other tools”

Extreme weather may drastically change a stream. Intervention to protect infrastructure is needed, but what size channel was it? How do you find out?

Training for municipal, highway or agency staff and contractors who work with streams:

Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Time: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (Lunch included)

Location: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties Agroforestry Resource Center and Bowery Creek Training Facility (6055 State Route 23, Acra, NY 12405)

Improve your decision making ability with this hands-on training in the use of USGS StreamStats, an online watershed assessment tool that can be used to find the expected dimensions of a stream at any given place. Learn to access the online site, determine the drainage area upstream, and use the information to compare the expected versus existing conditions. This program features a field session where participants will practice taking measurements in the stream and learn ways to problem solve the issues identified. This workshop is a version of the NYS Post Flood Stream Intervention assessment protocols intended for highway or agency personnel and contractors working in streams.

The training is FREE and will provide guided hands-on experience in both the classroom and field sessions (RAIN OR SHINE). Computers and materials will be supplied.

Lunch is included! Space is limited!

For more information and to register, Click Here!

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Water Quality Update: What a Hudson River sewage overflow looks like

On July 18, a fast-moving intense summer thunderstorm whipped through the region, resulting in a short burst of rain – and a flood of raw sewage into the water.

Here’s what it looked like in Kingston:

Take a look at that video, and then multiply it by about 660. That’s what happens to the Hudson River when it rains.

The latest data:
Check out the latest data on fecal contamination in the Hudson River Watershed, the best indicator of water quality for recreation. Remember that the data show a snapshot in time, and don’t indicate water quality today.

Hudson River Estuary
Upper Hudson
Mohawk River
Mill Creek
Moordener Kill
Poesten Kill
Quackenderry Creek
Wyanants Kill
Catskill Creek
Roeliff Jansen Kill
Esopus Creek
Saw Kill
Rondout Creek
Wallkill River
Ossining Beach
Pocantico River
Sparkill Creek
Saw Mill River
Bronx River
East River
New York City

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Adapt: The Key to Climate Resilience


This video highlights Climate Smart Communities (CSC) certification program’s action to “develop climate adaptation strategies.” Visit tinyurl.com/CSCcertification to learn more.

To learn more about the Cornell Climate-Adaptive Design studio, visit: tinyurl.com/CornellCAD

To learn more about the Hudson River Estuary Program and how you can get involved, visit: tinyurl.com/HREstuaryProgram

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Save the Date! “Fostering Climate Resiliency in your Community” Forum – Saturday, June 24th

Cornell Cooperative Extension is hosting a forum on: 

Fostering Climate Resiliency in your Community
“How to become a leader using funding and support from NYS Climate Smart Communities” 

Date:            Saturday, June 24, 2017
Time:            9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Location:     St. Thomas Aquinas College – RSAC main room
                     (125 Route 340, Sparkill, New York, 10976) 

Communities will learn about new climate resilience grants and technical assistance available through the NYS Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program. The forum will feature municipal leaders who will provide insights into how their community is leveraging state resources to adapt to climate change and extreme weather. Presentations will also be given by representatives from the NYSDEC Office of Climate Change and the Hudson River Estuary Program.

Climate Smart Communities 2017 grant application deadlines are anticipated to be due in late July – a few weeks after this forum.

To register, click here!

 

This forum is part of the Hudson Estuary Watershed Resiliency Project, a program of Cornell University and Cornell Cooperative Extension in partnership with the NYS Water Resource Institute and the NYS DEC Hudson River Estuary Program, with support from the NYS Environmental Protection Fund.

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6th Annual Riverkeeper Sweep – May 6th!

The 6th Annual day of service for the Hudson River will be returning this spring on Saturday, May 6, 2017. You can now register to volunteer at one of over 90 Sweep projects across the Hudson Valley and New York City. Simply click on your choice of sites below.

At the 2016 Riverkeeper Sweep, more than 2,200 volunteers, and dozens of community partners worked along hundreds of miles of shoreline from Brooklyn to Troy to remove over 48 tons of debris, and plant or maintain 836 trees and native grasses. This year, as we reflect on the impact of the first five Sweeps (a combined 164 tons of shoreline debris removed), we are also looking to the future. We plan to expand the Sweep in 2017 by partnering with more communities, schools, businesses, and organizations than ever.

VOLUNTEER
Register at one of over 90 Sweep projects!

For more information, a list of sites, and to register, click here!

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