NOW RECRUITING: Crowdfunding Ambassadors

April 10th marks the launch of our 30 day crowdfunding campaign

Starting on April 10th our team’s goal is to raise $7500. Our one-month long crowdfunding campaign will allow the broader community, Cornell faculty and students, and all those whose passions align with the Dilmun Hill principles, to have a monetary role in the  creation of our project. Cornell Crowdfunding is a platform that allows Cornell organizations to collect funds for their projects. They stand by the ideal of making big impacts through small projects, and all of the donations that we raise during our campaign will go directly towards the barn project.

We are Looking for  Crowdfunding Ambassadors to help lead the campaign

To help our campaign come to full fruition, we are recruiting Crowdfunding Ambassadors. This short term leadership role will allow for experience in community outreach and fundraising techniques. With more hands and hearts behind the mission, we can surpass our starting goal of $7500. Ambassadors serve a meaningful role in the overall mission by expanding outreach and keeping the team on track to achieving short-term monetary objectives and ultimately the long-term project completion.

Interested in finding out more about becoming a Crowdfunding Ambassador for the Dilmun Hill Barn Project?

Attend our information session this Wednesday March 7th at 4:30 in Mann 102.

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Spring Recruitment

Help us seize the potential for growth!

A new semester (and a new year) is upon us. In 2018, we plan to see Phase I of the barn’s structure take form and passive systems such as solar panels and a rainwater collection system become a reality.

The continuation of our research and preparations to break ground this summer demands the aid of anyone whose interests align with the Dilmun Hill Barn Project’s mission to build a barn that embodies the future of sustainable design and agriculture. This may include but is not limited to passionate: engineers, designers, architects, environmental scientists, and urban planners.

We are now recruiting students who have experience or are looking to expand their practice in passive systems design, marketing, and fundraising (reaching out to local companies and potential sponsors).

This semester we are planning to focus on research, design, and the integration of passive systems with Phases I and II of the project, while keeping our sights set on the long term goal of developing an education space in the barn. The diverse layers of our project allow for students of every major to have a meaningful impact.

Interested in getting involved? 

Email Alena Hutchinson (amh345@cornell.edu)

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Formatting Designs for the Cornell Architects

Just before the end of the semester, we met with the CALS Facilities team at their office in Kennedy Hall. They gave our student architects a final design critique, and then showed us blueprints from previous CALS projects.

Our student architects are now working on reformatting the Dilmun Hill barn drawings to generate a drawing set that is up to the CALS architectural drawing standards, and we are excited to announce that we are only a few weeks away from submission!

Check out our new drawings:

The South exterior elevation

The North exterior elevation

Interior cross-sections

We got valuable feedback, particularly regarding the roof design, which we are modifying slightly to increase the potential for solar collection and cost efficiency.

We are on the home stretch! Our architects are now working on specifying building materials, doors, windows, hardware, roof materials, and finishes.

Construction is likely to begin early this summer!

Have a great new year!

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Project Spotlight: Placing an Emphasis on Sustainability.

Written by Oksana Bihun.

Being environmentally conscious and eating locally sourced foods appears to be growing in popularity among college students and workers alike. I grew up knowing the benefits of reusing materials, spending most of my summers in Ukraine in a small village where we grew much of what we ate; picking bugs off of potatoes and strawberries was my childhood calling. That’s why when this opportunity of working with a team dedicated to building Dilmun Hill a barn presented itself to me, I could hardly wait to combine my love of sustainable design with my interest in addressing food insecurity.

“I COULD HARDLY WAIT TO COMBINE MY LOVE OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN WITH MY INTEREST IN ADDRESSING FOOD INSECURITY.

I was attracted to the idea of building a sustainable, net-zero energy structure that would serve as both a work space and educational area for Cornell students. Dilmun Hill contributes enormous amounts of resources to the Cornell community that relatively few people know about and I was excited to expand their capabilities. Upon starting my research for the project, however, I realized that despite going into my third year of environmental studies, there were still concepts that I knew relatively little about. What makes the design of a building “sustainable”? What qualifies a structure as being “net-zero energy”? If these concepts are so great for the environment, then why isn’t everyone implementing them into new designs?

Making a structure sustainable involves intricate design planning that has strict guidelines. Not only do builders have to be conscious of the ecological impact of the structure, it also involves thought on how it will contribute to the surrounding community and how it affects those working or living in the space. Site selection and design play crucial roles in deciding what the greenhouse gas emissions will be, what form of transportation people use to access it, and on the continuation of ecosystem services. Similarly, net-zero energy structures require much more than might be implied by the term. The most obvious, and most significant, part is that there is a need for a clean energy source that can constantly keep up with the building’s energy demands. The additional requirements that most overlook is the need for energy efficient systems, high quality levels for insulation and lighting, and with materials sourced according to specific guidelines.

“WE’RE DESIGNING A STRUCTURE THAT WILL SERVE AS A MODEL FOR SUSTAINABLE ECOLOGICAL FARMING PRACTICES.”

So then why should we be pursuing such high, demanding standards? The answer lies in the fact that we aren’t just building another barn; instead, we’re designing a structure that will serve as a model for sustainable ecological farming practices that can serve as a reference for others. Our main focus is on integrating solar energy and a rainwater collection system into the barn. Our goal is to acquire enough solar panels so that the structure is entirely reliant on renewable energy rather than electricity from the Cornell grid. The rainwater collection system will be implemented to primarily wash produce collected from the farm.

It’s important to realize that these systems present many challenges in regards to cost and implementation. The energy needs of the barn will likely fluctuate, making it hard to estimate the number of solar panels needed. Also, the location of the barn will factor into how effecting the panels are at producing energy. In regards to the rainwater collection system, the quality of water required to clean produce is extremely high. The system will need extensive filtration and purification in order to clear out any potential pathogens.

Despite these challenges, we are determined to implement these sustainable systems and have plenty of resources to turn to. We are in contact with workers at the Cornell power plant in order to determine our best course of action in regards to renewable energy. We have been researching different solar farms to pull energy from as an alternative as well. There is extensive information about rainwater collection systems and plenty of studies to read about to figure out our best course of action. Another piece we’ve been reading about is biomimicry, specifically how some industries have been using these models to filter their water.

“THIS BARN WILL COME TOGETHER TO SHOW THE BENEFITS AND INTRICACIES OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN.” 

We’ve confronted these challenges early on and are eager to collaborate and find solutions that will work for our project. We’ve been following every lead that falls on our laps and are confident that this barn will come together to show the benefits and intricacies of sustainable design through the lens of agricultural farming practices.

 

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Support the Dilmun Hill Barn Project!

We are happy to announce that we now have a CORNELL GIVING ACCOUNT .

Thanks to the help of Cornell Alumni Affairs & Development,  anybody can support the Barn Project with a tax deductible donation of any amount.

Please support our project and help us reach our fundraising goals! Our student architects have submitted their final designs for review. You can check out their work HERE, and read about our fundraising goals on our SUPPORT page.

Our alumni have already helped us reach our Phase 1 goal! You can help us reach the rest! Every dollar counts.

 

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Barn Project Exhibition TONIGHT, 5pm in Mann Lobby

The Dilmun Hill Barn Project exhibition is happening tonight at 5PM in Mann Lobby!

Come by to check out the progress of our work, ranging from structural designs, passive systems, embedded technology and community engagement efforts of our team. Team members will be there to discuss the project tonight, and if you can’t make it, the boards will remain in the lobby throughout the weekend.

Leave your name on the list (shown above) if you would like to learn how to get more involved – or contact Alena Hutchinson (amh345@cornell.edu). Hope to see you there!

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Project Spotlight: Process & Progress of Sustainable Design

The sustainable design and passive systems mission has begun to take form after research, interviews and collaboration. Written by Olivia Heim. 

Olivia Heim (’21) with Brian Byun (’19), current Dilmun Hill Farm Manager

As a Design and Environmental Analysis major, I have a general knowledge base that allows me to apply concepts of human and ecological centered design to various fields.

Coming into the project, I had my sights set on attaining a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for the barn.  However, I soon discovered that the costs of going through the formal “LEED” process counteracts the economic distribution of the budget to maximize the barn’s design.

Consequently, rather than seeking the plaque, I decided to shift my focus and use “LEED” as a reference and basis for my decisions, thereby fulfilling the same sustainable goals. This idea coincides with our mission to create a feasible model for small-scale farmers. Often, the assumption that one does not have the resources or money to create a sustainable lifestyle alienates people from the concept; ultimately practical design invites all socioeconomic classes into an ecological way of life.

My process in reaching this goal has brought me to meet students and faculty passionate in the field, and since entering the culture of sustainable futures on campus, I am happy to say that I have been met with enthusiasm and an environment of collaboration.

In the midst of my search for examples and inspiration of sustainable design, I had the pleasure of receiving insight from Design and Environmental Design major, Chloe Collins (‘18). Chloe is LEED Green Associate and has an extensive knowledge of the “LEED” point system. After explaining to her the educational function and sustainable model for the barn, she 

STRESSED THE IMPORTANCE OF LIGHTING, VENTILATION, INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND THE OVERALL FOCUS ON HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN.

Zoned lighting systems, which allows for only necessary lights to be on, in addition to a focus on natural light will facilitate our pursuit for a net-zero energy loss. Likewise, natural ventilation and walls that maximize insulation are two of the many ways to negotiate the intense Ithaca climate with a net-zero goal.

WHEN IT COMES TO REDUCING ENERGY NEEDS, HEATING IS OFTEN THE PRIMARY OBSTACLE.

Solving this through an inexpensive design will be crucial to not only the barn, but for the many other small-scale sustainable buildings that we hope will look to the barn for inspiration.

My conversation with Collins concluded with discussion of phase 2 and 3 of the project which include building an education space for farm and general community workshops. She emphasized the potential for creating a space that can intertwine nature and therefore have healing qualities for the users.

Functionally, the classroom can be collaborative through the proper selection of movable chairs and tables. Most likely, the furniture will also be refurbished or built by the community to emphasize our focus on using locally sourced, recycled materials.

Collin’s assisted in narrowing down my design focus and will continue to be an important resource as the barn comes to life. From the research and insight I have received thus far, the design process is now moving towards gaining inspiration from projects on campus. Over the following weeks, I will be shadowing Matthew Kozlowski, one of the figures in the sustainable buildings sector of Cornell.

Soon, I anticipate having a clearer budget and phased plan for our passive systems.

A LOGISTICAL VIEW OF THE PROJECT PHASES WILL WORK IN CONJUNCTION WITH MY CONTINUED COLLABORATION WITH THE FARM MANAGERS TO MEET BOTH ECONOMIC AND HUMAN NEEDS.

My experience thus far has been inspiring and has confirmed my intrigue in the future of sustainable design; I am so excited to see where else the project will take me and the team!

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Dilmun Hill Barn Project: Interview with CALS Dean Kathryn J. Boor


After meeting with the Barn Project team in October to discuss our long-term plans, Dean Boor was kind enough to sit with us for a full interview. Interview transcribed directly, photo taken by Sasson Rafailov.

Where are you from, and how do you  think that has influenced you?

I was born in Elmira, NY, which is about 30 miles south of here. I grew up on a family-owned dairy farm in Horseheads, NY. So, my entire life up until I went to Cornell University was spent in the Southern Tier here in the state of New York, on a farm where we raised our own meat, where we drank our own milk, where we grew almost all of the vegetables that we ate- we preserved them for the rest of the year; we bought most of our fruits but we also canned and preserved those too, and froze a lot of them.

My folks have lived through the Depression. They are extremely frugal; my mom still recycles aluminum foil, and there’s almost no waste on the farm, upon which my parents still live. That childhood has had a deep and lasting influence on me as a person.

I came here to Cornell as an undergraduate and studied food science, with a primary goal of ensuring that the world- every human on earth- has a safe, affordable, nutritious food supply; that was the vision and the concept behind choosing food science as a major. Food science is actually focused on preventing food waste: preventing food from spoiling and moving it to consumers.

“THAT HAS BEEN MY NORTH STAR, SO TO SPEAK, AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER, MY ENTIRE LIFE.”

“A photo of me with my Brown Swiss cow at the Chemung County Fair, probably around 1976”

After I graduated from Cornell, I went to the University of Wisconsin to focus in this area, and I spent my research time in East Africa with the most vulnerable populations on earth at that time, along the shores of Lake Victoria. This region was experiencing the highest population growth rate in the world in the early 1980s. The farm sizes were diminishing with each successive generation, and you could see the consequences on the children, who no longer had high-quality protein in their diet. We aimed to move into their lives protein through multi-purpose goat production systems, and my job through food science was to see if we could introduce a new food like goat milk without causing harm, in a way that would be beneficial for their lives, for their health, for their overall well being.

After that, I completed a Ph.D. at the University of California Davis,

“AND THEN IN 1994 I CAME BACK HERE AS THE FIRST FEMALE PROFESSOR HIRED IN FOOD SCIENCE.”

The rest of the story, you know. Certainly that background influenced dramatically how I saw my career shaping up, and has really influenced the way I have focused my career, since the early days on the farm. My parents are still there, and I go down to visit them every Saturday. They’re in their nineties, and I make sure everything’s cool. I am still very deeply connected to that farm.

What would you say has changed since you were an undergraduate here?

Pretty much everything, other than some of these buildings. But certainly, and I’ll speak about Cornell more broadly, the things that I love so much about Cornell that have changed are a dramatic improvement in the diversity of students at Cornell, which I think is something that is really important.


“WE HAVE A GROWING UNDERSTANDING OF THE FACT THAT DIVERSITY IS NOT ENOUGH, YOU NEED INCLUSION, AND WE ARE SINCERELY WORKING TOWARDS IMPROVING INCLUSION FOR EVERYONE AT CORNELL AS A TOP PRIORITY.”

Those are the things I love most about Cornell: sincere commitment to diversity and inclusion, and that’s so different than the way that any university was in the late seventies. That whole mindset has changed, and the population of our students has changed so much in really, really good ways. In Cornell and in CALS, diversity is a very high priority and we take it very seriously.

The majors have changed, the departments have changed. Just in the last seven years we have merged the plant sciences into a school of integrative plant science. We have certainly updated our majors, and we have created one of the most exciting majors, I think, in the entire university, which is environmental and sustainability science. We have created that major with the explicit goal of ensuring that students who graduate from Cornell across that range of majors- from environmental engineering students, who could go into fracking, to folks who come out of what was our natural resources program, who tend to be environmental activists- the goal with this new major is that across this entire spectrum, those who graduate from this major will be able to speak respectfully to each other five years post-graduation. That was the charge that was given to the people to develop this major. It’s too early to tell if we’ve achieved it, because our first graduates happened only last year, but it’s

“The 1979 Cornell Dairy Product Judging team. Margaret Bender, Dr. Frank Shipe, me, Wendy Diener. We traveled to Chicago in November 1979 to compete in a national contest.”


“SOMETHING THAT I THINK IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT, MORE IMPORTANT NOW THAN EVER, TO CREATE PEOPLE WHO CAN SPEAK RESPECTFULLY TO EACH OTHER WHEN THEY DIFFER IN OPINION.”

That’s something that I see as a really important thing that Cornell can do and Cornell needs to do, and that’s something that I think we have really focused on. Our intergroup dialogue class that is housed in CALS is something that we support and will support, and is something that I think is another sign of the commitment of this college to these critical principles.

We also teach and focus on sustainable agriculture, and that was something that was way less true when I was a student, when we focused more on production agriculture.

“WE FOCUS NOW MUCH MORE NOT ON HOW TO PLANT YOUR FIELD, AS MUCH AS ON THE CRITICAL DECISION MAKING SO THAT YOU’LL BE IN BUSINESS TWENTY YEARS FROM NOW, HOW TO REALLY BE THINKING ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY IN EVERY DIMENSION”

because let’s be blunt about it: sustainability requires, at the end of the day, financial sustainability, and without that, you’re lost. Financial sustainability always has to be part of the equation, and that goes for whatever you’re setting up: your farm, your family, your business, financial sustainability is absolutely essential.

Could you talk about your personal mission as the Dean of CALS?

I will say, it has happily evolved since I’ve been in this role. I agreed to step into this role right after the global economic downturn, and so my goal when I first took this job was to cut our expenditures fifteen percent and to leave the college stronger than I found it. It was that sharp and that clear, that was what I was going to do. And the team; I have to say, none of this is about me, it’s about the team. We have the most incredible leadership team in this college that you can imagine. Everybody is passionately committed to the future of this college. So we achieved that: we cut our expenditures and I believe that we have created a stronger college  than ever.

We have been hiring a really exciting new faculty: one hundred and seven new positions that we have been able to release, with a great increase within the last couple of years.

“WE ARE REALLY FOCUSED ON BUILDING THE BEST SCHOOL OF INTEGRATIVE PLANT SCIENCES IN THE WORLD.”

We’re number two right now, we’re going to be number one; we’re aiming for that in an aggressive way.

We’ve launched a new major in organic food production, and we have had a tripling in applications to this college. Seeing student interest in this college go up so greatly since 2005, with the greatest increase in the last few years, is so gratifying.

“A photo of me with my family in June 2010, just as I became dean. You see me holding the beaver skin hat that belonged to CALS first dean, which was passed down to Dean Liberty Hyde Bailey and all successive CALS deans since then in a “passing of the hat” ceremony.”

In terms of what I want to do by the time, 2020 will be the end of my second term, and the end of my role in this position. By then I have a few other things that I wish to accomplish.


“THE MISSION REMAINS THE SAME, WHICH IS TO CONTINUE TO BUILD AN EVEN MORE VIBRANT COLLEGE WHERE PEOPLE WANT TO BE, WHERE PEOPLE FEEL INCLUDED, WHERE PEOPLE FEEL THAT WHAT THEY’RE STUDYING MATTERS AND THEY WILL BE PREPARED TO HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD.”

 One more thing- I have a few- but one thing that’s really important to me is to elevate our international programs in this college above and beyond where they currently are. They’re already phenomenal, but I think they’re one of the best kept secrets at Cornell. So, one of the last things I want to achieve before 2020 is to elevate that program in a way that is sustainable, and in a way that brings more visibility to the program.

Within the last year, CALS has completed a rebranding effort. Could you talk a bit about the new CALS mission and the motivation behind it?

The mission hasn’t changed, it’s the way we talk about it. Part of our challenge, in being an institution as old as we are (the college itself formed in 1904), having a name like “agriculture”, that name has a lot of baggage, and a number of people who don’t have a close affiliation with agriculture don’t necessarily see it in a positive way.

“AGRICULTURE, THE WORD “AGRICULTURE”. WHILE I INSISTED THAT WE KEEP THE WORD “AGRICULTURE” IN OUR TITLE BECAUSE IT IS SO CENTRAL TO WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO, AND WHO WE WILL BE, I WANTED A FRESH WAY TO SPEAK ABOUT THE COLLEGE THAT SEEMS MORE VIBRANT.”

At the heart of what we do is change life. We are life changing, we are about studying life as it is changing; evolution as one of our core disciplines in this college. We change people’s lives, we set them up to go on to do great things, so that resonated so much with me, that notion of life-changing. Including in the main CALS logo the delta sign instead of an “A” really symbolizes that importance, that notion of change, and how central that is to us.

Kathryn Boor, 15, in front of Bailey Hall with 4-H group

In fact, I have here the presentation that I gave when I was interviewing for this job. This is a photo of me at Cornell, at age fifteen or so, and this is Bailey Hall. I did 4-H, these were my buddies, and we were all here for a week-long program. It was that point I
realized that CALS was where I wanted to be. 

The part I wanted to point out: I was asked for my inspiration, and remember we had just gone through the worst recession, certainly in my life-time, and so Neitzche, that was number one (“That which does not kill us makes us stronger”), and number two was Darwin (“It is not the strongest species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change”). Life changing.


“TO BE STRONGER, WE HAVE TO CHANGE. THIS IS PUTTING US ON A LIFE-LONG PATHWAY TOWARDS FEARLESS EVOLUTION AND TAKING RISKS.”

For example, the communication major started as agricultural journalism, and now it is the top-ranked social science program at Cornell, and it’s world ranked, in the top ten communication programs in the world. We haven’t lost our roots over there, because what they’re still focused on are issues associated with poverty alleviation, with feeding the world, with environmental issues, things that are really core to a modern college of agriculture and life sciences. So, they’re very true to their roots, but nobody would call them agricultural journalism. We have been really fearless about allowing that kind of evolution in the college. From the outside, people will look and say “what is a communication program that is a world specialist in social media doing in a college of agriculture?” But it makes perfect sense to us. Likewise, the Dyson School was originally agricultural economics, but we evolved that into a world-class undergraduate business program. Fearlessness about evolution in the college is just part of our ongoing theme.

The other thing that we had previously done was talk about our areas of focus more as silos: life sciences, food and energy systems, environmental sciences, social sciences, while in reality they don’t act that way, they’re all completely integrated.


“NOW WE HAVE BETTER LANGUAGE TO REFLECT THE INTEGRATION ACROSS OUR DISCIPLINES AS OPPOSED TO SPEAKING ABOUT THEM AS IF THEY WERE INDEPENDENT OF EACH OTHER, WHICH THEY ARE NOT.”

How do you think Dilmun Hill fits into the way that CALS is speaking about their mission now?


“I’M SO PROUD OF DILMUN HILL. IT IS, AGAIN, ABOUT EVOLUTION. WHAT I BELIEVE MATTERS THE MOST FOR STUDENTS, FOR ANYONE ACTUALLY, IS LEARNING HOW TO LEARN, LEARNING HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS, LEARNING HOW TO TAKE INITIATIVE.”

One of the things I think Cornell does best, not just CALS, but Cornell as an entity, is provide experiential opportunities for our students where the safety net is pretty far below and it’s kind of got holes in it.

Dean Boor with Dilmun student managers and CUAES staff in 2016, touring Dilmun’s new moveable high tunnel funded by TSF

The reason that’s so important is that you’re in charge, you are in charge of Dilmun Hill and you won’t find that at many other universities in the country. Cornell is unusual in putting control of student programs squarely in students’ hands.  For example, our EMS program is also totally student run. The students are in charge of maintaining the drug inventory, they’re in charge of maintaining the vehicles that they drive, they are in charge of saving lives. If they find a body out on the street, they’re in charge, there is no faculty member who is going to come along and tell them what to do. That’s the beauty of Dilmun Hill.

“FOR THE STUDENTS WHO COME ALONG AND EMBRACE THE CHALLENGE OF ALL THAT IS DILMUN HILL, THEY WILL GRADUATE FROM CORNELL AS STRONGER INDIVIDUALS, AS PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS, PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE DEAN, PEOPLE WHO KNOW HOW TO GET THINGS DONE.”

That’s why I am so committed to Dilmun Hill, and other experiential learning opportunities like DIlmun Hill for our students.

You don’t have an abundance of resources, not nearly as many as I would like you to have, but to some extent, that’s part of the process. I love seeing the initiative, I love seeing folks understanding how to move things forward, how to navigate, that’s part of the process. Where will Dilmun Hill be in ten years? I’m not sure, but I am confident that with the kind of leadership that we get at Dilmun Hill that it will be in a better place, that it will have more resources, that it will have more toys.

“I SEE DILMUN HILL AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PROCESS, TOWARD SOMETHING EVEN BETTER THAN IT IS RIGHT NOW.”

Of course, it does rely very much on student interest, and it will continue to rely very much on student interest. That’s why you’re so important, and that’s why your colleagues are so important. What you do is to recruit others who, like you, become passionate about Dilmun Hill and who are committed to working with me, to working with the next Dean, to make sure that we don’t lose sight of it, to make sure that we are committed to it, and that we’re working with you to make things even better.

What do you think the future of Dilmun Hill and CALS looks like?

For CALS, the most important thing we can do is to create leaders from our students, and to set up the environments and experiences that help people learn how to make decisions.

“I SEE CALS AS BEING A LEADER, NOT ONLY AT CORNELL BUT MUCH MORE BROADLY, FOR CREATING THOSE KINDS OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS, AND DILMUN HILL IS REALLY RIGHT AT THE CENTER OF THAT.”

I see CALS as being committed to continuing to build opportunities like that, broadly speaking across the college and across the university.

I see us as continuing to focus on sustainable agriculture, trying to help mitigate climate change, and trying to help ameliorate some of the challenges we see. That’s the reason we are focused on plant sciences, because a lot of the solutions are going to come through plant-based proteins and plant based products.


“WE’VE GOT TO BE BUILDING THE TALENT WE NEED NOW. IN TEN YEARS WE WILL BE THE PLACE FOR THE PLANT SCIENCES, THERE’S NO DOUBT IN MY MIND THAT IS TRUE.”

Dean Boor at Dilmun Hill farm stand during Cornell Farmer’s Market. Photo by Lindsay France for Picture Cornell.

“DILMUN HILL IS AN EVOLUTION, AND IT REALLY WILL RELY ON BRINGING IN THE NEXT GENERATION OF STUDENTS WHO ARE AS PASSIONATE AS YOU ARE.”

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Barn Planning: Site Walk with the 2017 Managers

This morning the barn project design team met at Dilmun with the 2017 Farm Managers to learn about their work flow, and to investigate locations for the new barn. We began the discussion outside of our current barn, where we reviewed the layouts discussed with them last week.

Next, we followed the managers as they explained their work flow, from harvesting produce, to washing, packing, and finally, to storage.

THEY SPOKE WITH US ABOUT THE FARM’S GOAL TO MEET THE GOOD AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES (GAP) STANDARDS, WHICH ARE BECOMING INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT FOR SMALL FARMERS. 

We discussed layouts for a vegetable processing space that would streamline workflow and designate spaces for vegetables during their each stage during their progression from freshly harvested, to cleaned and packed.
Finally, we went to the top of the hill, where we discussed potential locations and orientations for the new barn, and how we could maximize space for educational and community gatherings.

DESIGNING TO MEET THE FUNCTIONAL NEEDS OF BOTH A FARM AND AN EDUCATIONAL FACILITY HAS BEEN AN EXCITING CHALLENGE FOR OUR STUDENT ARCHITECTS

We laid flags to mark a rough footprint, and were amazed by how large it feels.

The student architect team is now ready to return to the drawing board, and begin making final adjustments to their designs. To learn more about our architect’s design process, see our Architectural Mission.

COME TO OUR WORK PARTY NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER IST TO CHECK OUT OUR SITE FLAGS!

 

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NOW RECRUITING: Campaign Leaders

We are looking for student leaders to spearhead our fundraising and branding efforts!

Our team is recruiting student leaders to spearhead our fundraising and branding efforts for the Dilmun Hill Barn Project. This is a great opportunity for students who are interested in strengthening their leadership, communication, and networking skills. We are also seeking students with experience in media design and management.

To find more information about our goals, read ABOUT THE PROJECT

Email Alena Hutchinson (amh345@cornell.edu) if you are interested in joining us.

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