San Francisco CRP alumni reception a smashing success

(Author unknown)

(Author unknown)

Thank you!

Over 60 alumni, friends, CRP students, and faculty enjoyed the Cornell reception at the San Francisco APA Conference on April 15. This was one of our largest get togethers in years, saw folks from across the US and abroad representing more than 40 years of CRP classes interacting and having a great time together.

CRP PhD James Macmillen wins 2019 Guilford Essay Prize

James Macmillen (Image via Taubman College – University of Michigan)

James Macmillen (Image via Taubman College – University of Michigan)

Cornell CRP PhD James Macmillen has just won the 2019 Guilford Prize, a competition sponsored by the Cornell Department of English. “The Phoenix Keepers: An Anthropology of Futurity in Detroit City Hall” was based on Macmillen’s PhD work at Cornell.

Although administered though the English department, the Guilford Prize may be awarded to a doctoral student in any discipline “whose thesis is judged to display the highest excellence in English prose.” Not only is it nice to be fêted with praise for good work, the prize comes with $1500 award, as well.

After Cornell, Macmillen headed (mid)west to work as an assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.

Check out CRP highlights from Cornell in Rome

This spring semester, Associate Professor of the Practice George Frantz (M.R.P. ’91) took students in CRP 4160 – Rome Neighborhood Studies all over Italy to learn about its history as well as current initiatives that are shaping its built environment. In class field trips, students visited community gardens in Rome’s Fossa Bravetta and Naples’ Afragola neighborhoods, toured an under-development former industrial site in Turin, and met with the activists who run Eco dalle Città, a food-recycling program in the same city.

CRP students (L-R) Shayna Sarin, Nathan Revor and Emily Grace share a light moment on the way to a meeting in Pellestrina. (Image: George Frantz)

CRP students (L-R) Shayna Sarin, Nathan Revor and Emily Grace share a light moment on the way to a meeting in Pellestrina. (Image: George Frantz)

Students undertook this firsthand learning as part of Cornell in Rome, a semester-long program that gives planning, art, and architecture students at the undergraduate and graduate levels the opportunity to live and learn in Italy’s capital.

Check out the gallery above to see more highlights from the semester.

After a 6- kilometer hike to the construction site of the TAV high speed rail tunnel near Chiomonte, students in CRP 4160 partake of the local fountain in the center of the village (L-R) Shayna Sarin, Alec Faber, Lilah Rosenfield, Olivia Chaudhury, Cayla Kaplan, Emily Grace, Nathan Revor, Oliver Goldberg-Lewis. (Image: George Frantz)

After a 6- kilometer hike to the construction site of the TAV high speed rail tunnel near Chiomonte, students in CRP 4160 partake of the local fountain in the center of the village (L-R) Shayna Sarin, Alec Faber, Lilah Rosenfield, Olivia Chaudhury, Cayla Kaplan, Emily Grace, Nathan Revor, Oliver Goldberg-Lewis. (Image: George Frantz)

CRP prof. George Frantz wins award for leadership in service-learning

 Students on a field trip to Pennsylvania in Prof. Frantz’s fall 2018 Environmental Impact Review course. Image: Grant Thompson (M.R.P. ’20)

CRP Associate Professor of Practice George Frantz has received the Kaplan Family Distinguished Faculty Fellowship in Service-Learning. The $5,000 award will be used to support Frantz’ community-engaged teaching and research. This year, he was one of two Cornell faculty to receive the grant.

Last fall, Prof. Frantz led students in his environmental impact review class on a field trip to western Pennsylvania to examine fracking’s impact on the landscape. This spring, he is teaching at AAP’s Rome program.

More information about the award can be found here.

Min Bu (M.R.P. ’14) and collaborators win awards for plan that reveals Shanghai history

Rendering of the Caoyang Community's Huaxi Road shows how the walkway will be made more inviting to pedestrians. (Image: Ti Gong/Shine)

Rendering of the Caoyang Community’s Huaxi Road shows how the walkway will be made more inviting to pedestrians. (Image: Ti Gong/Shine)

CRP alumna Min Bu (M.R.P. ’14) and a team of Shanghai planners has won two awards for a proposed redesign of Caoyang Community, the city’s first development devoted to housing for workers

Inspired by Boston’s Freedom Trail, The Shanghai Urban Construction Design and Research Institute designed a stroll that will let visitors get to know the area’s history. Established in 1951, the lead designer for the Caoyang Community was architect Wang Dingzeng, who drew on the ideas of planner Clarence Perry who pioneered the idea of the neighborhood unit.

The proposal picked up the Jane Jacobs Award for Community and Regional Planning and the Special Award for Excellence in Advancing Social Equity. Both were awarded by the APA’s International Division.

Read more about the project here.

 (Image: Ti Gong/Shine)

News via Shine.

Cornell team wins APA Student Design Competition with “Fruit Pad”

Fruit Pad affordable housing proposal by Kevin Kim (M.L.A./M.R.P.), Lera Covington (M.P.S./M.R.P.), Jeanette Petti (M.L.A./M.R.P.), and Dylan Stevenson

A Cornell team took home the gold in the student design competition at the American Planning Association’s (APA) 2019 National Conference in San Francisco. Students Kevin Kim (M.L.A./M.R.P.), Lera Covington (M.P.S./M.R.P.), Jeanette Petti (M.L.A./M.R.P.), and Dylan Stevenson (Ph.D. C.R.P.) wowed the jury with Fruit Pad, an affordable housing marketing and educational campaign that takes a “fresh look” at Fruitvale, a neighborhood in Oakland, CA. The East Bay city has sky-high housing prices amidst rapid gentrification thanks to a Bay Area–wide housing crunch fueled by an influx of residents and tech money.

Take a look at the introduction to Fruit Pad below, and check out the rest of the project here.

Oakland has an affordable housing crisis. It’s the third most expensive metro area in the country for renters, and it’s gotten increasingly difficult for Oakland residents to obtain affordable housing.

Though this problem persists, the City of Oakland has been diligent in its efforts to address the housing crisis. It’s implemented a variety of affordable housing programs and policies throughout the years and, with the release of the Mayor’s Housing Action Plan: A Roadmap to Equity and the City’s Housing Element
Plan, it’s working on implementing even more.

With strong housing policies already in place and more in the works, we didn’t want to rehash these strategies or propose what the City has already proposed, so we decided to take a different approach. We think that Oakland has all the necessary policies in place to successfully address its affordable housing crisis, so we’re going to use what the City already has – but package them a little bit differently.

That’s why we’re recommending Fruit Pad – a fresh and revamped educational and marketing program for Oakland’s affordable housing policies, specifically tailored to the Fruitvale neighborhood. Fruit Pad uses a variety of strategies – from turning the neighborhood into a living lab with affordable housing “experiments” to empowering local leaders to open their homes to residents looking for advice – all in an effort to make the City’s existing affordable housing policies and resources more transparent and more approachable.

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