CRP Faculty & Students Presenting at ACSP 2019

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CRP faculty and Ph.D. candidates will be presenting at the annual conference for the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, taking place October 24-27. The event will be hosted by the Department of City Planning and Real Estate Development at Clemson University in Greensville, South Carolina.

Associate Professor Neema Kudva will be a panel participant for the GPEIG Roundtable Breakfast Session: “Global” Dimensions of Planning: Moving Beyond Program Accreditation Requirements. 

Below is the list of abstract titles by CRP faculty and students that have been accepted by ACSP.

APPLY COMPUTER VISION AND MACHINE LEARNING TO MEASURES HUMAN PERCEPTION OF STREET DESIGN QUALITY: TAKING SHANGHAI PUDONG DISTRICT AS AN EXAMPLE
Waishan Qiu (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author
Xiaokai Huang [Harvard University], co-author
Xiaojiang Li [Massachusetts Institute of Technology], co-author

SCENARIO PLANNING FOR TRANSFORMATIVE ALTERNATIVES UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE – FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR TOOL DEVELOPMENT
Ryan Thomas (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author
Assistant Professor Linda Shi, co-author
Associate Professor Jennifer Minner, co-author

THE LOCAL PARADOX – COMMUNITY RECOVERY AND MUNICIPAL ADAPTATION IN STATE POLITICS FOR STRATEGIC RETREAT
Jared Enriquez (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author

SHRINKING CITIES IN URBANIZED CHINA: DYNAMIC TIME-SERIES CLUSTERING
Yuanshuo Xu (M.R.P. ’13, Ph.D. ’19), presenting author

PRAGMATIC MUNICIPALISM: US LOCAL GOVERNMENTS’ RESPONSE TO FISCAL STRESS
Professor Mildred Warner, presenting author
Austin Aldag (Ph.D. candidate), co-author
Yunji Kim [University of Wisconsin-Madison], co-author

RISING SEAS AND FISCAL DECLINE – THE ROLE OF STATE POLICIES IN SHAPING LOCAL VULNERABILITY AND ADAPTATION TO SEA LEVEL RISE
Assistant Professor Linda Shi, presenting author
Austin Aldag (Ph.D. candidate), co-author

UNEVEN WATERS: UTILITY, CHINESE CONTRACTORS AND MIDDLE CLASS HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CITY OF KHULNA
Farhana Ahmad (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author

A STORY OF TWO LEVELS: HOW DO SUB-NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS INFLUENCE LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTIONS?
Lu Liao (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author

‘MANAGED RETREAT’ AS AN ADAPTIVE PLANNING RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE DISPLACEMENT
Professor Kieran Donaghy, presenting author

MANSPLAINING STILL THE NORM: GENDER DYNAMICS IN PLANNING WORKPLACES
Marisa Turesky [University of Southern California], presenting author
Professor Mildred Warner, co-author

ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEXT ON RESIDENTS’ HOUSING SATISFACTION
Assistant Professor Suzanne Charles, presenting author
Daniel Kuhlmann [Iowa State University], co-author

BENEFITS OF ELEVATOR POLICY FOR OLD WALK-UP BUILDINGS: EVIDENCE FROM BEIJING RESALE HOUSING MARKET
Visiting Lecturer Ziye Zhang (Ph.D. ’18), presenting author

THE COMMON GROUND: CLASS, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, AND THE BATTLE FOR PUBLIC SPACE IN GURUGRAM, INDIA
Visiting Lecturer Shoshana Goldstein (Ph.D. ’19), presenting author

LOCAL CAPITALISTS AND THE POLITICS OF PLANNING INFRASTRUCTURE THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS IN SMALL CITIES
Nidhi Subramanyam (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author

EQUITABLE ACCESS TO SANITATION IN CITIES IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Professor Victoria Beard, presenting author

CAN AGE FRIENDLY PLANNING PROMOTE EQUITY IN PUBLIC HEALTH ACROSS THE RURAL-URBAN DIVIDE?
Xue Zhang (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author
Associate Professor Mildred Warner, co-author

NAVIGATING IN TWO SYSTEMS: INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE ACCESSIBILITY IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY
Dylan Stevenson (Ph.D.candidate), presenting author

THEORY AND PRACTICE: ON IMPROVISATION, JUSTICE AND INJUSTICE
Professor John Forester, presenting author

ROUNDTABLE – THE SCHOLAR-PRACTITIONER INTERFACE IN THE PLANNING ACADEMIC JOURNAL
Lisa Bates [Portland State University], moderator
Heather Campbell [University of British Columbia]
Professor John Forester

ANALYZING THE CAUSES AND DURATION OF SPELLS OF CARLESSNESS AMONG LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
Assistant Professor Nicholas Klein, presenting author
Mike Smart [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey], co-author

EXAMINING PUBLIC TRANSPORT ACCESS AND USE AMONG WOMEN IN INDIA: CASE OF A MEDIUM SIZED CITY, PANCHKULA
Seema Singh (Ph.D. candidate), presenting author

JUST PLACES? COMMUNITY PRESERVATION, ART, AND EQUITY
Associate Professor Jennifer Minner, presenting author

A multi-college alumni reception will be held on Friday, October 25.

 

Patric Hollenstein, Liisa North, and Mildred Warner: Listening to Local Voices: Using Collaborative Ethnography to Understand the Links between Community Well-Being, Public Services, and Family Strategies in Ecuador

Rural road

Tungurahua, Ecuador

Date and location: October 4, 12:20 p.m. in Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium, Milstein Hall

Glenn H. Beyer Memorial Lecture

Patric Hollenstein has a master’s degree in political studies (FLACSO Ecuador). He is professor at the Central University of Ecuador. His work specializes in markets, agrifood networks and chains, fair trade, popular and solidarity economies, and rural territories. He is writing his doctoral thesis on the transformation of public food markets in Ecuador.

Liisa L. North is professor emerita from York University in Toronto and FLACSO in Ecuador. She has written 12 books and more than 60 articles and chapters on rural development, agrarian reform, political economics and public policy in Andean countries. Her most recent book is Dominant Elites in Latin America: From Neo-liberalism to the “Pink Tide” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2018).

Mildred Warner is professor of city and regional planning at Cornell University. She served with the Peace Corps in Tungurahua, Ecuador, in 1979 and has maintained connections with the region since that time. Her research focuses on public services and community development. She authored more than 100 journal articles and several edited volumes.

Abstract:

The province of Tungurahua, Ecuador is one of very few places in Latin America that has achieved economic growth and reductions in inequality at the same time. Investments in infrastructure, and connecting rural and urban through roads, markets, and education has built an integrated region. This has made real the politics of buen vivir in the lived experience of rural people in place —the buen lugar. We use the power of narrative to build situated knowledge to enhance scholarly understanding of this rural transformation, and we promote knowledge equity by engaging local voices. By lifting up individual experience we can articulate the particularity of the local within larger forces.

Liisa North, Patric Hollenstein, and Mildred Warner will present the context and the oral histories of rural residents featured in their recent book, Un Buen Lugar en Tungurahua: Estrategias Familiares de un Pueblo Rural, (FLACSO Ecuador, 2018).

Cosponsored by the Latin American Studies Program and the Einaudi Center

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Apiwat Ratanawaraha: Street-Smart David vs Digital Goliath: Competitive Dynamics between the Top and Bottom of the Informal Mobility Pyramid in Bangkok

parked motorcycles

Motorcycle taxis in Bangkok

Date and location: October 3, 4:30 p.m. in 115 West Sibley Hall

Apiwat Ratanawaraha is an associate professor at the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. His teaching and research cover land policy and management, infrastructure finance, technology and innovation policy, and strategic foresight. His recent and ongoing research focuses on urban issues in Thailand, including the futures of Thai urban life from womb to tomb, foreign ownership of land, informal mobility, parking policy, and urban citizen science. His publications include The Land Economy of Thailand (2015); “How Operators’ Legal Status Affects Safety of Intercity Buses in Thailand”(with Saksith Chalermpong, Transportation Research Record 2672 [2018]); and a chapter on Bangkok in Parking: An International Perspective (with Saksith Chalermpong, Elsevier, forthcoming).

Ratanawaraha holds a B.Eng. in urban engineering from the University of Tokyo, an M.Phil. in land economy from the University of Cambridge, and an M.C.P. and a Ph.D. in economic development and technology policy from MIT. He was a visiting assistant professor at the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning and a visiting scholar at the Harvard-Yenching Institute.

Abstract:

Motorcycle taxis are everywhere in Bangkok, serving millions of trips a day throughout the city. Rent-seeking activities and informal governance at the street level have allowed the operators and the “influential people” to capture monopoly rents from the relatively captive market for a long while now. Things have changed since global ride-hailing firms started to provide comparable, if not more convenient, services a few years ago, luring away their passengers and chipping away their market power and income. In this talk, Ratanawaraha uses the concepts of economic rent and competitive dynamics to explain the competition and contention between the two groups of informal operators, and to discuss policy options.

Cosponsored by the Southeast Asia Program

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Saleemul Huq: Developing Climate Resilient Migrant Friendly Towns in Bangladesh to Tackle Future Climate Migration

Boats in river

Time and Location: Friday, September 27, 12:20 p.m. Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium, Milstein Hall

Russell Van Nest Black Lecture

Saleemul Huq has been the director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD) at Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB) since 2009. He is also a senior fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)

Prior to joining ICCCAD, Huq was a director of the Climate Change Programme at the IIED. He has worked extensively in the interlinkages between climate change (both mitigation as well as adaptation) and sustainable development from the perspective of the developing countries, with special emphasis on least developed countries. Before that he was the founding executive director at the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies, a leading independent research and policy think tank in Bangladesh. 

Huq completed his B.Sc. (with honors) in 1975 from Imperial College London and his Ph.D. in plant sciences also from Imperial College in 1978. Huq has published numerous articles in scientific and popular journals, was a lead author of the chapter on adaptation and sustainable development in the third assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and was one of the coordinating lead authors of “Inter-relationships between Adaptation and Mitigation” in the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report (2007). He is also the author of “Streamlining Adaptation to Climate Change into Development Projects at the National and Local Level,” in European Parliament, Financing Climate Change Policies in Developing Countries (2008).

Abstract:

Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change and is expected to have around 10 million climate change refugees — mainly from low-lying coastal regions — due to sea level rise over the next few decades. These migrants will almost certainly end up mostly in Dhaka, which is already the fastest-growing megacity in the world and would have great difficulty absorbing so many climate change-induced refugees. We have identified approximately 20 secondary towns around the country with current populations of around half a million that could potentially absorb another half a million refugees each, and are developing a program for making these secondary towns into climate-resilient, migrant-friendly towns.

Cosponsored by the Carl L. Becker House

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Noreen McDonald: Impacts of Ridesourcing on Road Safety: Analysis of Austin, Texas

street projecting from phone screen

Photo credit: photo / Matheus Bertelli from Pexels

Time and Location: Thursday, September 26, 4:30 p.m. Room 115, West Sibley Hall

Noreen McDonald is a faculty member at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she serves as chair of the Department of City and Regional Planning and holds the Thomas Willis Lambeth Distinguished Chair in Public Policy. She also serves as director of the Carolina Transportation Program and associate director of the Collaborative Sciences Center for Road Safety and Southeastern Transportation Research, Innovation, Education and Development Center.

McDonald is interested in how investments in infrastructure such as schools, roads, and bike lanes influence travel decisions and the downstream impacts of those decisions on road safety, public health, and city structure. Her work considers how these relationships differ across space and demographic groups and how new technology (Uber, Lyft, autonomous vehicles) may disrupt these relationships. McDonald received her undergraduate degree from Harvard in engineering and chemistry and her Ph.D. in city planning from University of California – Berkeley. Prior to becoming a professor, she worked as a consultant for Cambridge Systematics and Mercer Management Consulting (now Oliver Wyman).

Abstract:

Improving road safety and setting targets for reduction of road traffic crashes and deaths is highlighted as part of the United Nation’s sustainable development goals and city, state, and country Vision Zero projects. Over the past decade, ride-sourcing has increased dramatically, yet evaluations of the road safety impacts have been limited and mixed. In this work, we analyze the effects of ride-sourcing on road crashes, injuries, fatalities, and driving while intoxicated in Austin, Texas. Our work is unique because it uses trip data from a ride-sourcing provider and analyzes variation at a small geographic scale. We find ride-sourcing volumes negatively impact DWI arrests and have no significant association with other road safety outcomes.

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Francesca Russello Ammon: Urban Renewal and Restoration in Postwar Philadelphia

image from Philadelphia history archives

photo / courtesy of PhillyHistory.org, a project of the Philadelphia Department of Records

Time and location: 9:30 a.m. Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium, Milstein Hall

Francesca Russello Ammon is a cultural historian of urban planning and the built environment. Her research focuses on the social, material, and cultural life of North American cities, from World War II to the present. She is particularly interested in the history of urban revitalization; public history as a tool for community-based research and engagement; and the ways that visual culture has shaped understanding of what cities have been, are, and should be. Ammon is the author of Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape (Yale University Press, 2016), winner of the 2017 Lewis Mumford Prize for the best book on American city and regional planning history. Her work has also appeared in the Journal of Planning History, Journal of Urban History, Journal of planning Education and Research, Preservation Education and Research, Change over Time, and Technology and Culture.

Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania’s departments of City and Regional Planning and Historic Preservation, Ammon was a visiting scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in American studies from Yale University, her Master of Environmental Design from Yale School of Architecture, and her B.S.E. in civil engineering from Princeton University. Ammon’s work has received support from institutions including the American Council of Learned Societies, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Society of Architectural Historians, Whiting Foundation, and Ambrose Monell Foundation.

Abstract:

While urban renewal took the form of large-scale demolition in most American cities, the policy could incorporate rehabilitation and restoration as well. Philadelphia was at the forefront of such an approach. In its Society Hill neighborhood, planners married relatively selective clearance with the restoration of existing colonial-era houses and the in-fill construction of new, contemporary designs. Despite this distinctive emphasis on preservation, however, renewal still displaced numerous businesses, residents, and uses within this community. Through the landmark case of Society Hill, this talk considers the place of rehabilitation in the urban renewal process, the meaning of historic preservation at this formative moment in the professionalization of the field, and the role of history in urban revitalization.

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