https://www.flickr.com/photos/kimdokhac/33730606362

An ostensible member of the creative class, hard at work. (Image: kimdokhac/Flickr)

This Thursday, Amit A. Batabyal, a professor of economics at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), is coming to Sibley to discuss how Schumpeterian competition affects entrepreneurial activity and innovation within the creative class, and how that competition affects economic growth. The talk, in W. Sibley’s Room 101, is slated for September 27 at 4:30 p.m.

Although Batabyal is a Cornell alumnus, he didn’t graduate from the MRP program (missing out!). Instead, Batabyal left Ithaca in 1987 with a B.S. in applied economics and business management.

A summary of his talk, officially “Schumpeterian Creative Class Competition, Innovation Policy, and Regional Economic Growth,” is reprinted below:

Batabyal focuses on a region that is creative as described by Richard Florida. The creative class is broadly composed of existing and candidate entrepreneurs. The general question the class analyzes concerns the effects of Schumpeterian competition between existing and candidate entrepreneurs on economic growth and innovation policy in this region. The class performs four specific tasks. First, when the flow rate of innovation function for the existing entrepreneurs is strictly concave, we delineate the circumstances in which competition between existing and candidate entrepreneurs leads to a unique balanced growth path (BGP) equilibrium. Second, the class examines whether it is possible for the BGP equilibrium to involve different levels of R&D expenditures by the existing entrepreneurs. Third, they show how the BGP equilibrium is altered when the flow rate of innovation function for the existing entrepreneurs is constant. Finally, they study the impact that taxes and subsidies on R&D by existing and candidate entrepreneurs have on R&D expenditures and regional economic growth.

More information on this and other Department of City and Regional Planning (CRP) lectures can be foundĀ here.

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