03
Dec

Small delights

Amidst our crazy schedules and  weekend field trips, there are plenty of ways to enjoy the city whether it be just for the day or a few hours. Here are some of my favorites from the past few weeks:

Ravioli/Fettuccine Night!

This was much like our first pasta night where we learned how to make gnocchi (except this was obviously with ravioli and fettuccine). Everyone loved helping out from making the dough to stuffing the pasta with spinach and ricotta cheese. Personally, my favorite part is trying all the different sauces Anna Rita makes for us (bolognese, butter with sage, salmon, and much more).

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A Night At the Orchestra!

Last Monday night, our class was able to see the orchestra play at the Santa Cecilia Concert Hall (designed by Renzo Piano). Between the beautiful setting and the peaceful music, it was an extremely relaxing way to spend the evening. It was also fun to dress up and take a break from classes.

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Soccer Game!

On Sunday night, Todd, Takuma, Braydn, and I all went to see Rome’s soccer team play against Milan. The stadium was filled with enthusiastic fans, colorful waving flags, and lots of singing. The atmosphere was thrilling and Rome won the game!

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19
Nov

On The Mediterranean!

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From November 7th until the 9th, the class went on our last overnight field trip of the semester. The trip also happened to fall on my birthday, so I was especially excited for the weekend.

On the first day, we stopped briefly to see the Certosa di San Lorenzo, an old charter house in Padula. Walking through the old rooms was extremely peaceful as we were the only group visiting and the sound of the rain from outside carried through the halls.

At the top of the famous spiral staircase in the charter house

At the top of the famous spiral staircase in the charter house

View of inner courtyard

View of inner courtyard

Todd overlooking the same staircase

Todd overlooking the same staircase

We spent the rest of the day in Paestum where we saw Greek temples and ruins. We stayed the night at Hotel Calypso, which was extremely unique in its design and atmosphere. After dinner the whole class hung out on the beach that was just a two-minute walk from the hotel. We waded into the Mediterranean, had a bonfire, chatted, and listened to music. This was definitely my favorite part of the trip (and not just because it was the night of my birthday).

Greek Temple behind, Cristina, Pamela, and Cassidy

Greek Temple behind, Cristina, Pamela, and Cassidy

Hotel Calypso

Hotel Calypso

Hotel lobby

Hotel lobby

21!!!

21!!!

The next day the group met our history professor Jan Gadeyne in Herculaneum, where we learned about the eruption of Mount Vesuvius and its effects on the Bay of Naples. Herculaneum, like Pompeii, was destroyed by the eruption, but it was preserved the best out of all the towns in the area. We were able to walk through the town itself, into homes, and bath complexes. It was pretty cool and eerie at the same time!

Old storage units for the shoreline where over 200 bodies were found during the town's excavations!

Old storage units for the shoreline where over 200 bodies were found during the town’s excavations!

Remnants of paintings inside one of the surviving homes

Remnants of paintings inside one of the surviving homes

Napoli, which I was especially excited to see as my grandfather is a descendent from there, was the final stop on the trip. Between the evening on Saturday and the morning on Sunday, we went to the National Archaeological Museum, went on a walking tour of the city, and saw a charter house much like the one in Padula. I was most amazed by the view of the bay and Mount Vesuvius (and also the extremely cheap and delicious pizza!).

Arnold, Takuma, and John looking at an artifact in the National Archaeological Museum

Arnold, Takuma, and John looking at an artifact in the National Archaeological Museum

Jan teaching us about a statue of Aphrodite in the archaeological museum

Jan teaching us about a statue of Aphrodite in the archaeological museum

The largest nativity scene I haver ever seen! (Naples is famous for these)

The largest nativity scene I haver ever seen! (Naples is famous for these)

Pizzeria Lombardi!

Pizzeria Lombardi!

I ate the whole thing....no shame here.

I ate the whole thing….no shame here.

Gelato from the oldest chocolate shop in the city!

Gelato from the oldest chocolate shop in the city!

All in all, the trip was short but sweet, and I’m glad that I got to spend my birthday while traveling in a beautiful area with my crazy yet lovable archie family!

Overlooking Mount Vesuvius at the charter house in Naples

Overlooking Mount Vesuvius at the charter house in Naples

It's not a field trip without a family picture!

It’s not a field trip without a family picture!

 

07
Nov

Lecture by Gianni Dessì

On the evening of October 22, Gianni Dessì gave a public lecture at the Cornell in Rome Palazzo Lecture Hall. Dessì studied art at the Accademia di Belle Arti di Roma and received a degree in scenography. His work spans a variety of mediums, but he has always maintained a close relationship with theater. Some of his pieces have even been shown at the Venice Biennale (1984, 1986 1993) and at the Quadriennale di Roma (1986, 1996). Dessì’s artnet profile can be found here.

Dessì began his lecture by emphasizing the time and culture in which he was born, and he explained how this context propelled him to become the artist that he is now. He stated, clearly and confidently, that he was “born in the middle of the last century.” After asking us how old we all were, he proceeded to recollect his world at the age of 20 – it would be three years before he would hold his first solo exhibition.

Dessì’s work has transformed quite a bit over the years, and he passionately narrated how he developed as an artist and grew to produce the works he currently does.

His work was presented through a projection in the Cornell in Rome Lecture Hall.

Dessì’s work was presented through a projection in the Cornell in Rome Lecture Hall. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Gianni Dessi presents one of his first installation & sculpture works. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Gianni Dessì presents one of his first installation & sculpture works. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Dessì also spoke intently about individual pieces. He described how they were sited in gallery spaces, the process through which they were constructed, and what propelled him to create each work. He had a way of describing each work modestly and simply, and I appreciated his effort in doing so, for it allowed us to gather our own interpretations of his art.

Dessi shows us an installation work he developed relating to perspective and color.

Gianni Dessì shows us an installation work he developed relating to perspective and color. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

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Here Dessì speaks about his working process and how this particular piece was composed. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Dessì’s words and images generated a lot of discussion during our drawing course, and although we could not see his works in person, his descriptions were quite vivid and memorable. With an artistic background in theater and scenography, he concluded this lecture of his development as an artist with a simple and very inspirational line: That was my part in the comedy.

06
Nov

Tuscany!

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From Roma to Montepulciano to Pienza to Siena to Pistoia to Lucca to Pisa and then back to Roma! During the last weekend of October, our class traveled to Tuscany for a four-day trip-our schedule was clearly packed, but extremely memorable. Each of the cities were unique in their own way, and all of them were a refreshing change of scenery from the busy streets of Roma.

In Montepulciano, we got to enjoy cappuccinos and pastries from a famous bakery and enjoy the sun while laying in the field of the San Biago church. Being able to see the Tuscan landscape from the tower of the town’s main piazza was also a great way to start off the morning (The photo above and the first one below were taken from the bell tower in Montepulciano).

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In Pienza, we explored and the town and stopped for lunch at small but crowded restaurant. Pienza is famous for its Pecorino cheese, so there were many great shops to buy cheeses, wine, and other goods.

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Siena was the largest of the six towns we visited. It had much to see from its winding shopping streets to its cathedral and civic complexes. Personally, I enjoyed walking through the streets at night and the great pastries from the famous bakery Nannini the most.

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We spent the night in Lucca before heading to Pisa. Lucca was very quaint and quite similar to Siena. The streets were small but bustling and the culture was very vibrant. I really enjoyed walking on top of the city wall, which surrounds the entire town and has ever since its construction in 1645.  It was beautiful seeing the town lit up at night and to be able to get some fresh air and exercise amidst all the traveling.

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The top of the city wall

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In Pisa, we visited the Cathedral Complex for the first half of the day (yes, this included the famous leaning tower). Believe it or not, Pisa felt more touristy than Rome. It is a very tiny and congested town where nearly everything felt like a tourist trap. The Camposanto (image below) was a great escape from the craziness. There, we sketched for some time and got to see art work being restored that was destroyed during World War II.

Samuel sketching in Camposanto

Samuel sketching in Camposanto

Danica walking inside the Camposanto

Danica walking inside the Camposanto

Classic tourist shot of me holding up the tower :)

Classic tourist shot of me holding up the tower :)

The last stop of the trip was a private tour at Rocca di Frassinello at Gavorrano (designed by Renzo Piano). Between the drive through the valley and the view from the rooftop of the wine estate, I couldn’t believe how breathtaking the scenery was. After the tour, we got to taste a few of the wines and were able to see the sun set before heading home. By the end of the trip, we were all exhausted after seeing so many sites and ready to get back to Roma. I always find it funny how field trips change my perspective on Roma; in the beginning, I can’t wait to get out of the city and take a break from all the craziness, but by the end, I feel like my apartment is my home away from home, and I am instantly welcomed by loud sirens and familiar activities.

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where the wine is stored

where the wine is stored

on the roof

on the roof

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view from the roof

view from the roof

 

28
Oct

A Weekend in Mantova

Mantova was the last city that our class stayed in during our recent week-long field trip, and lucky for us, we arrived on the weekend during a special event in Mantova called La Notte Bianca, or The White Night. Visiting the city of Mantova was a fantastic way to end to our long trip, and although there was a lot to learn – the environment was quite relaxing during the day and a lot of fun during the night! Perhaps it was because we arrived during the night of La Notte Bianca, but it seemed that everyone in the town was out and having a great time during the late hours in the city.

Mantova is a city in Lombardy, Italy and is surrounded by artificial lakes on three sides. These lakes were originally created as a defense system for the city during the 12th century. As a result, the scenery of Mantova is almost always somewhat foggy and almost ephemeral at times. The weather is cool and the skies are the most welcoming and friendly shades of blue and gray.

 

In the morning, the nearby lakes always are covered by a beautiful fog. Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

In the morning, the nearby lakes always are covered by a beautiful fog. Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

Walking to our Hotel. It’s important to wear comfortable shoes on this cobblestone! Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

We had actually taken the bus to the city of Verona for the day to learn about a few architectural sites there, you can read about it in Anna’s post here, but when we arrived back in Mantova for the night, we were able to explore the city during La Notte Bianca. Unfortunately, I only have a few low-quality iPhone photographs of the event, and none of the photographers were able to take photos (they were all having too much fun exploring the city!!), but I hope my description can create an image of the event.

 

Essentially, the entirety of the city was awake and having an amazing time from 11:00pm to 3:00am. All restaurants and cafes were open and even had special menus, shops reopened for the night crowds, and there were so many live musical performances happening at every corner in the city. At one point, I specifically remember Beyonce’s “Drunk in Love” being blasted with the bass rolling through the alleyway. It was so surreal! I walked through the foreign city at night with my friends just soaking up every aspect of the environment. A lot of talented musicians with a variety of musical styles were performing that night – piano players, guitarists, singers… crowds would gather at every intersection to stop and enjoy the music.

The entire city was awake and walking about.

The entire city was awake and walking about.

A very talented DJ on one street corner. Projected behind him were some famous architectural sites that we actually learned about on this trip (this one being St Mark's Campanile in Venice).

A very talented DJ on one street corner performed for a large crowd. Coincidentally, projected behind him were some famous architectural sites that we actually learned about on this trip (this one being St Mark’s Campanile in Venice).

iPhone photograph I took of my friends Danica, Andres (one of our photographers!), and John walking through the city during La Notte Bianca.

iPhone photograph I took of my friends Danica, Andres (one of our photographers!), and John walking through the city during La Notte Bianca.

Our stay in Mantova was a fun way to end our trip

for the Sunday after La Notte Bianca was a very long bus ride back to Rome! I’m very glad that we arrived during the time we did and were able to have such an amazing time in a wonderful city.

 

20
Oct

The Elegance of Urbino

Urbino was the city that our class stayed in for the first night of our trip, and it proved to be one of my favorites for its calm, quiet environment and beautiful hillside views. The walled city is quite small and sited high up on a sloping hillside. To give a sense of scale, Rome has an elevation of 20m with a population of 2.7 million, and Urbino has an elevation of 450m with a population of ~18,500. The high elevation allows for spectacular views of the hills and cooler weather, and the small population causes the city to remain quiet during the day, with a gentle bustling during the nights.
We arrived in the city around late evening time, just before the sunset. Our hotel was located on the top of a hill, so we all used elevators to bring our belongings to the building. We had the rest of the day to explore- and as soon as we situated our things and exited the hotel, we were greeted with stunning views of the surrounding hillsides.

There are large greenspaces with benches on the walking path. Perfect places to stop and enjoy the scenery, or hold a conversation with a friend with the hillsides as a backdrop.

There are large greenspaces with benches on the walking path. Perfect places to stop and enjoy the scenery, or hold a conversation with a friend with the hillsides as a backdrop.

The alley we walked through when we exited our hotel- photo taken with my iPhone.

The alley we walked through when we exited our hotel- photos taken with my iPhone.

And as soon as you exit the alley ... gorgeous views of the hillside surround you.

And as soon as you exit the alley … gorgeous views of the hillside surround you.

There is an elegance in Urbino that I have not experienced before. There was an openness and friendliness to the town, and there was an air of security that enveloped even the most vast spaces. The colors of the buildings were clean and modest – off-whites, pale yellows, and tan bricks were set off by the gray cobblestone roads and piazzas. It was quiet enough to listen to the cool breeze, and the sunlight slipped into the urban landscape so gently – I often times would think of water color paintings as I walked through the town. We found ourselves walking uphill and downhill quite often, but unlike Rome where alleys are quite thin and dark, the roads of Urbino were quite spacious and well-lit. The breeze through these spaces was gentle and inviting – my jacket would flow with the wind as I walked. The quietness of the town could be attributed to the lack of vehicular noise – almost no cars would pass by, for most students and locals are able to simply walk anywhere & everywhere within the town.

 

One of the alleys on the hill leading to the center of the city. Look how wide and inviting it is! The breeze is lovely, and the colors are like those of a watercolor painting.

One of the alleys on the hill leading to the center of the city. A quiet environment and very wide roads.

iPhone night photo of the alley that leads to our hotel- the same one in the first photograph of this post.

iPhone night photo of the alley that leads to our hotel – the same one in the first photograph of this post.

 

Area near the inner city. Paths lead up & down the hills and the buildings frame fantastic views.

Area near the inner city. Paths lead up & down the hills and the buildings frame fantastic views. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

A lot of young people are in the city- mostly college students. Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Pam & Natalie enjoy the scenery! Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Pam & Natalie enjoy the scenery! Photograph by Erin Soygenis.

Our photographer, Erin Soygenis!

Our photographer, Erin Soygenis!

The town is indeed quite small, both in terms of population and size. When my friends and I walked through the city, we realized that we could walk from one end to the other in less than 30 minutes (and of course, stunning views were on either side.) Often times, we would see familiar faces too – crossing paths with the locals occurred quite frequently during the evening. We would pass clothing stores, stationary shops, and many restaurants & cafes as we walked from our hotel to explore the city. The Palazzo Ducale, a Renaissance building in the center of the town and one of the most important architectural works in Urbino, became a landmark for us to meet and branch out.

 

Piazza space in front of the Palazzo Ducale.

Piazza space in front of the Palazzo Ducale.

Palazzo Ducale. Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

Palazzo Ducale. Photograph by Andres Romero Pompa.

Urbino is a simple, small, and quiet town on the hillside, and I really felt that the town’s tranquility was the perfect starting point for our journey.

 

10
Oct

Gnocchi Night!

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Last Thursday, Anna Rita taught our entire class how to make her famous potato gnocchi. Everyone got a chance to work with the dough whether it was kneading it, rolling it into sections, or cutting it into bite size dumplings; and in addition to learning how to make gnocchi…we got to eat it!

There were a variety of sauces that Anna Rita prepared for us, and by the end of the night, we were all stuffed. The meal was absolutely delicious and those who were lucky got to snag some left-overs for the next day. My personal favorite was the butter with sage and the pumpkin sauce; but there was also bolognese, swordfish with olives and tomatoes, asparagus with nuts, and some frittatas and desserts on the side.

Let’s just say I couldn’t move for a few hours afterwards…

Here are some photos from the night… Enjoy!

Lots of hands for lots of gnocchi!

Lots of hands for lots of gnocchi!

Anna Rita making dough with Cristina and John

Anna Rita making dough with Cristina and John

 

Renee and Cristina

Renee and Cristina

Gayle, Erin, and Dan

Gayle, Erin, and Dan

Todd, King of Gnocchi

Todd, King of Gnocchi

Frittatas!

Frittatas!

Pumpkin gnocchi, my favorite!

Pumpkin gnocchi, my favorite!

The end product...yum

The end product…yum

One of the desserts...sweet peach bread

One of the desserts…sweet peach bread

06
Oct

Northern Italy in Eight Days – Venice

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Venice was our longest stop on the trip and by far the most exhausting as the city was huge and crowded. From the packed taxi boats to the winding streets with a lot of dead ends and bustling crowds of foreigners – I think most of the class was immediately overwhelmed. I had always pictured charming little canals with a small town atmosphere, so I was surprised by the intense and chaotic  ambience. Unfortunately I was unable to go on a gondola, but I was able to see a lot of groups enjoying their ride with a singing gondolier!

Museums

Vinny has already discussed the museums of Venice, so I won’t dwell on them too much, but I loved seeing modern exhibits- it was really refreshing to since our schedule for the trip was so heavy with historical sites.

At the Arsenal exhibit (part of the Biennale - a series of modern architectural exhibits that updates twice a year)

At the Arsenale exhibit (part of the Biennale – a series of modern architectural exhibitions and pavilions that updates every two years)

At the Biennale. Between the Biennale and the Arsenal we spent a total of 6 hours, but it could have easily been 6 days!

At the Biennale. Between the Biennale and the Arsenal we spent a total of 6 hours, but it could have easily been 6 days!

At the Biennale

At the Biennale

Room made with book shelves-at the Arsenal

Room made with book shelves-at the Arsenal

At the Palazzo Grassi Art Museum

At the Palazzo Grassi Art Museum

At the Palazzo Grassi Art Museum

At the Palazzo Grassi Art Museum

 

Nightlife

At night the city surprisingly becomes very charming and quiet. Huge plazas once packed with tourists are now nearly empty. Restaurants with outdoor seating have live performances. The streets are so quiet that you can hear the waves from bay. And my most favorite, everything is dark and lit by lanterns, giving a very romantic yet mysterious feel.

Piazza San Marco
Piazza San Marco
Live performance with dinner
Live performance with dinner

 

Storefronts

Out of all the cities I have been to so far, Venice definitely had the best stores. It seems strange to point this out, but it’s actually a great city for window shopping. Am I planning on buying that 1500 euro skirt  from Prada? Of course, not! But I really enjoyed winding through the streets and seeing beautiful windows with vivid colors and unique staging on either side of me. Here are some of my favorites…

A ton of glass! Pretty much anything you can think of was made of glass-even balloons!

A ton of glass! Pretty much anything you can think of was made of glass-even balloons!

Fabrics in Venice usually have influence from Eastern Europe, so a lot of gold and embroideries!

Fabrics in Venice usually have influence from Eastern Europe, so a lot of gold and embroideries!

 

 

 

 

 

 

02
Oct

Northern Italy in Eight Days – Small Towns

The foothills of the alps

The foothills of the Alps

Aside from the amazing site visits in each of the cities, I was extremely fascinated by the cultural and atmospherical differences between each city. Those towns include: Gubbio, Urbino, Padova, Mantova, and Verona (Venice was a three-day stop between Padova and Mantova). Even the drive to each city on our huge tour bus was spectacular. We got to see sites such as the one above for hours at a time.

Gubbio

Gubbio was our very first stop of the trip. During our free time many of us took cable cars to the town’s overlook. I was expecting closed elevators of some sort, but they turned out to be standing, bird cage-like lifts. Being able to stand in the open air while climbing the great hill was thrilling.

Gayle and Alex starting their ascent

Gayle and Alex starting their ascent

Sagar and I overlooking  the view from the lift about halfway up

Sagar and I overlooking the view from the lift about halfway up

Urbino

Urbino, like Gubbio, is a small hilly town. The scenery was lush and the local cuisine was delicious. The weather was a bit chilly at night as well, so it was nice to bundle up in coats and scarves while wandering the cobblestone streets at night.

The hills are alive with the sound of music....

The hills are alive with the sound of music….

View from park where we played soccer the first night

View from park where we played soccer the first night

View from the roof top garden from the university building

View from the roof top garden from the university building

Pasta Fagioli- hearty and filling

Pasta e Fagioli – hearty and filling

Padova

Padova was a very short stop, but we were able to see a famous café while there. This café, Caffè Pedrocchi, was decked out in marble, frescoes, grand staircases, and fine fabrics. My favorite room was the yellow ball room where we saw a private party being set up. The rest of the city was quiet but busy – filled with markets, eateries, and shops. For lunch we got to buy fresh fruit from the market, and it was without a doubt the best fruit I have had in Italy.  Padova felt like a happy medium between a small town like Urbino and a big city like Rome.

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Mantova

Mantova was similar to Padova in that it was not as remote as Gubbio but not nearly as chaotic as Rome. It shares a similar atmosphere to that of a small college town like New Haven.  The buildings were very old, but they were upkept in a modern manner, and the city sits on a large lake with walking paths and boating docks. The restaurants were fantastic and specialized in pumpkin pasta. One night a group of opera singers from Japan broke out into song so the whole restaurant enjoyed a free performance. There was also a street festival on our last night. Every store and restaurant extended their hours, there was live music and street performances, a car show, and tons of people enjoying the activities. My favorite performance was a singing and dancing marching band – they immediately put smiles on everyone’s faces!

The opera singers!

The opera singers!

Pumpkin ravioli

Pumpkin ravioli

Verona

Saving the most classic town for last, Verona was definitely the most iconic and touristy of the small destinations. Here we enjoyed much during our free time. I climbed to the top of the town’s clock tower and saw a view of the city, wrote a letter to Juliet under the balcony where Romeo called to her, and then visited a beautiful garden with the class.

Natalie climbing the steps of the clock tower

Natalie climbing the steps of the clock tower

walls at the entrance of the house of Juliet

Walls at the entrance of the house of Juliet

Pam in the Castelvecchio

Pam in the Castelvecchio

View of the city

View of the city, clock tower in background

Getting trapped in the garden maze

Getting trapped in the garden maze

Tim sketching in the garden

Tim sketching in the garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

01
Oct

Northern Italy in Eight Days – Introduction

Six cities. 28 students. Three professors. Eight days. You could say we were a little bit busy…and to say that we all weren’t completely exhausted by the end of the trip would be an understatement. As I mentioned in my wine tasting post, our class traveled to Northern Italy from September 14th until the 21st. But before I tell you about my highlights of the journey, let me explain how a field trip works in the world of archies.

Each day starts early (between 7:30 and 8:30). After a quick breakfast, we all trail out into the city and immediately start exploring palaces, ruins,  gardens, museums, churches, churches, and more churches. At each site, our professors give us background information and introduce ways to think critically about the structures and their various elements. Then we are invited to observe the site on our own – this may last anywhere between 15 minutes and 2 hours. This means tons of photography and analytical sketching (we will be graded on these sketches at the end of the semester).  The class activities last the entire day, usually until 7pm, and then we are free to eat, explore, and relax for the rest of the night.

Here are some photos of archies in their natural habitat…

Vinny at the Ducal Palace in Gubbio

Vinny at the Ducal Palace in Gubbio

America at the Municipal Palace of the Middle Ages in Gubbio

America at the Municipal Palace of the Middle Ages in Gubbio

Group sketching in modern housing development in Venice

Group sketching in a modern housing development in Venice

Sagar at the Villa Barbaro designed by Palladio

Sagar at the Villa Barbaro designed by Palladio

Professor Blanchard and the class in the Ducal Palace of Mantova

Professor Blanchard and the class in the Ducal Palace of Mantova

Cassidy at the University in Urbino

Cassidy at the University in Urbino

Alex in the Ducal Palace of Urbino

Alex in the Ducal Palace of Urbino

Stefan at the Castelvecchio in Venice

Stefan at the Castelvecchio in Verona

Tim at the Casa del Mantegna in Montova

Tim at the Casa del Mantegna in Mantova

Group resting at the Ducal Palace in Mantova

Group resting at the Ducal Palace in Mantova

Andres and Danica at the cemetery designed by Carlo Scarpa near Padova

Andres and Danica at the cemetery designed by Carlo Scarpa near Padova

Natalie and Todd Casa del Mantegna in Montova

Natalie and Todd at the Casa del Mantegna in Mantova

Professor Blanchard, Gayle, and Erin at a church in Venice

Professor Blanchard, Gayle, and Erin at a church in Venice

Arnold at the Carlo Scarpa Museum in Venice

Arnold at the Carlo Scarpa Museum in Venice

Arnold and Sagar at the Ducal Palace in Urbino

Arnold and Sagar at the Ducal Palace in Urbino

Group at the Carlo Scarpa museum in Venice

Group at the Carlo Scarpa museum in Venice

As you can see, there is a lot of ground to cover. So instead of trying to cram all my favorite things into one massive post, I will break the trip into two (small towns and Venice). Hopefully this will make it easier on your eyes and my memory!

p.s. Unfortunately I do not have any images of  the actual sketches…people can be shy about their sketchbooks  (including myself)- but hopefully I’ll gather some in the upcoming months!