Skip to main content

Nutrition Education Articles

The following articles are sent to the TimesTelegram by Linda Robbins, CCE Herkimer County Nutrition Educator and published weekly.

Pumpkin: More Than Just a Fall Decoration
Pumpkins make great fall decorations, but they are also delicious, rich in nutrients, and low in calories according to Food and Health Communications.  Just one-half cup of canned pumpkin provides 4 grams of fiber, no fat or cholesterol, and only 50 calories. Pumpkin also has more beta-carotene per serving than any other commonly eaten food. Your body converts beta-carotene to vitamin A, and that may protect against heart disease and some cancers.  Read more…

Preparing Safer Jerky
Jerky can be made from almost any lean meat, including beef, pork, venison or smoked turkey breast. Raw poultry is generally not recommended for use in making jerky because of the texture and flavor of the finished product, according to the National Center for Home Food Preservation. Read more…

Butternut Squash is a Fall Favorite
Butternut squash is a fall favorite due to its sweet, nutty flavor and smooth texture, reminiscent of buttered sweet potato.  It is a great multi-use squash for fall dishes, including those that call for pumpkin.  Further, butternut squash stores well for several months in a root cellar or cool, dry location.  And last but not least, it is very nutritious (Vitamins A and C), including the seeds, according to Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Read more…

Using and Preserving Green Tomatoes
Some home gardeners have planned purposes for green, unripe tomatoes early in the season, while others grab end of season unripe tomatoes off the vines before the frost hits like we experienced recently in many areas of Herkimer County. If you have a lot of green tomatoes, here are some ideas to preserve them from Elizabeth L. Andress at the National Center for Home Food Preservation at the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension. Read more…

Drying Foods in New York State
Preserving food by drying or dehydration is the oldest known method of food preservation, dating back thousands of years. Drying preserves food by removing sufficient moisture to prevent the growth of spoilage and illness-causing microorganisms.  Read more…

Choose New York State Apples
At last count, more than 7,500 apple varieties have been identified worldwide; more than 2,500 varieties are grown in the United States – 100 of which are grown for commercial sale.  New York is the second-largest apple producing state in the country. Only Washington State produces more apples than the Empire State.  Read more…

Enjoy Homemade Salsa
With fresh tomatoes, peppers, onions, and other favorite salsa ingredients plentiful at this time of year, it’s a great time to enjoy making salsa for your family according to Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.  Read more…

Safe Canning Amid Canning Supply Shortages
Many home canners are finding the shelves stripped of canning jars and lids this season with the increased interest in home food preservation.  The right equipment is a must to safely preserve food by canning according to Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.  Read more…

Peaches – Summer Treat
Peaches are a summer treat that are a low-calorie source of the antioxidant vitamins A and C according to Food and Health Communications. They are high in fiber, especially pectin, a soluble fiber that helps to lower high blood cholesterol. The fuzzy fruit is also a source of flavonoids and beta carotene; these two compounds may help prevent the growth of certain cancers.  Read more…

Tips for Using Eggplant
When prepared properly, eggplant is a nutrient-dense and versatile vegetable that works well as an entrée, side dish, feature ingredient, or dip. If you’ve been skeptical about cooking eggplant because it seems too spongy or soggy, try these simple tips from Kendall Reagan Nutrition Center at Colorado State University.   Read more… ‎

Eat a Healthy Salad
What you sprinkle over your greens, as well as the amount can make or break a salad. Here are some ideas that will boost flavor and healthfulness of your salad from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  Read more…

Watermelon – A Summertime Favorite
Watermelon is an American summertime favorite that provides a refreshing way to help us reach the MyPlate recommendation of 1-2 cups from the fruit group each day according to the University of Nebraska – Lincoln Extension.  One cup of watermelon is equal to 1 small slice (1 inch thick) or 1 cup diced.  Watermelon is naturally low in fat, sodium and has no cholesterol. It provides a source of potassium, vitamin C, Vitamin A and folic acid.  Two cups of watermelon contain only 80 calories.  Read more…

Here’s to Crisp Pickles This Season
There are several factors that determine pickle crispness according to Iowa State University Extension and Outreach.  First and foremost, use true pickling cucumbers for pickling.  Salad cucumbers were never intended for pickles as they are too large and contain a thick seed base compared to pickling cucumbers.   Burpless cucumbers are not suitable for fermented pickles because their skins are often tougher and contain an enzyme which will soften pickles during fermentation.   Look for slim, dark green cucumbers with prickly bumps on the skin no more than 2 inches in diameter. Read more…

Corn On the Cob Your Way
It’s that time of year to enjoy fresh corn on the cob. What is the best way to prepare corn on the cob? There are many ways to prepare it successfully. Check out preparation tips here…

New Home Food Preservation Resources from CCE of Herkimer County
This is a great time of year to enjoy the variety of fresh vegetables and fruits available; and you may be considering home canning or freezing some of this bounty for use this winter.  Read more…

Enjoy Fresh Herbs
Whether you plant them or pick them up at the grocery store or farmers’ market, adding fresh herbs is a quick way to transform ordinary meals into extraordinary meals according to the University of Nebraska – Lincoln Extension. Besides helping flavor foods when cutting back on salt, fat and sugar, herbs may offer additional benefits of their own. Researchers are finding many culinary herbs (both fresh and dried) have antioxidants that may help protect against such diseases as cancer and heart disease. Read more…

Grilling and Food Safety
Summer is peak season for grilling pretty much anything from burgers to vegetables. But remember to keep food safety in mind.  Read more…

Enjoy Fresh Strawberries
Nothing beats fresh strawberries either from your garden, “u-pick farm”, or local Farmers’ Market.  Here are a few tips for selection and preparation of this year’s crop.  Read more…

Keeping your Produce Safe
Fruits and vegetables are an important part of every diet.  However, harmful bacteria may contaminate fruits and vegetables, which can lead to food poisoning, even if the food is labeled organic. As you enjoy raw produce and fresh-squeezed fruit and vegetable juices, follow these safe handling tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to help protect yourself and your family.  Read more…

Try Grilling Fresh Produce 
While many of us think about cooking steaks and chicken on the barbecue, don’t forget to save room for vegetables and fruits. Not only does grilling add great flavor to fresh produce, it also simplifies meal preparation according to the Produce for Better Health Foundation.  Read more..

Preserving Rhubarb
Rhubarb is the vegetable that is enjoyed as a fruit. By itself, it provides a unique tart flavor, but combined with other foods to create sauces, pies, cakes, cobblers and jams provides us with delicious flavor combinations according to Penn State Extension.

Although fresh rhubarb is at its peak through May and June, harvesting can continue through the summer if plants have adequate water and don’t wilt from the intense heat of July and August. The quality is best if it can be pulled from the garden and used before stems have a chance to dry. Choose rhubarb stems that are bright pink, crisp, and free of disease or insect damage.  Read more…

Using the Updated Nutrition Facts Label During the Coronavirus Pandemic
The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has shifted many of our daily routines, including the ways we eat, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Perhaps you have stocked up on packaged foods and find yourself cooking at home more than usual. The Nutrition Facts label can help you learn more about the foods you have on hand or are purchasing online or in stores, especially if you are purchasing different foods because of temporary disruptions in the food supply chain or are buying more canned or packaged foods instead of fresh.  You can use the information on the label to assist in planning balanced meals and healthy total dietary intakes. Read more…

Tips for Storing Bread
Many of us may have been finding time recently to do more baking. If you were fortunate enough to be able to find a supply of yeast, you may have been baking your own bread. It tastes delicious right out of the oven but can become stale very quickly. Here are some tips from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach AnswerLine on the best place to store bread to keep it the freshest the longest. Read more…

Substitute Ingredients for Coronavirus Baking
When people feel anxious, they look for something to do, a distraction of sorts, and baking provides just that for many people.  During these challenging times, it seems that people are baking more at home than previously and psychologists have coined the baking frenzy as “coronavirus baking” or “stress baking”, according to Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Answerline.  Read more…

Considerations when Ordering Takeout or Delivery
As people isolate at home, they are ordering more delivery and take-out meals. Some foods are hot and some are cold when purchased. Many of these perishable foods can cause illness if not handled safely on the trip home or in home preparation and reheating. Proper handling of these foods and any leftovers is essential to reduce your family’s risk of foodborne illness, according to the Partnership for Food Safety Education. Read more…

Food Safety and COVID-19
We are receiving non-stop COVID-19 news and advice from one ‘expert’ to the next.  The messages are very mixed and sometimes downright FALSE.  The following is from AnswerLine, a part of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach that is committed to providing consumers with researched-based information and supporting the Center for Disease Control (CDC)’s measures and advice on staying safe during this time.  Read more…

Beat the “Quarantine 15”
You have probably heard about the “freshman 15” weight gain that college students supposedly experience in their first year of college.  But now we are hearing about what has been dubbed the “quarantine 15” that those now at home are experiencing with weight gain as they suddenly find themselves at home with their families because of the Coronavirus Pandemic.  Read more…

Clean vs. Sanitize: Know the Difference
It’s important to know the difference between cleaning and sanitizing. They aren’t the same thing. Both are important to help prevent the spread of harmful germs according to the Partnership for Food Safety Education.  Read more…

How to Keep Your Immune System Healthy
Although you may not be able to fully prevent an illness, a healthy immune system is one way to give your body extra protection. Focusing on nutrient-rich foods and healthy lifestyle behaviors can help you and your family stay a step ahead according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Read more…

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email