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Articles for CCE Educators

Buckthorn – Control of an Invasive Shrub – Glossy buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and common/European buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica) are common in many parts of NY, and can aggravate many ownership objectives. A variety of chemical and mechanical (i.e., organic) methods are available to control these species.
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Strategies to Improve Your Woodland – Many landowners, especially those new to the process of managing their woodlands, want to know if and how to make improvements. This is a common question that illustrates an interest and commitment by the owner to be more fully invested in their property.
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Harvesting Aesthetics and Forest Sustainability – The effects of deer browsing on woodlands and sugarbushes can have long-lasting effects (called “legacy” effects) that persist for decades after deer impacts are reduced. In areas with a history of deer overabundance, the failure to establish and grow new, young trees is having a detrimental effect on woodlands and the potential to keep these areas healthy and diverse.
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Low-Cost Fence Designs – to Limit Deer Impacts in Woodlands and Sugarbushes – The effects of deer browsing on woodlands and sugarbushes can have long-lasting effects (called “legacy” effects) that persist for decades after deer impacts are reduced. In areas with a history of deer overabundance, the failure to establish and grow new, young trees is having a detrimental effect on woodlands and the potential to keep these areas healthy and diverse.
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Small Parcels – In New York and most of the eastern states, the greatest proportion of woodland owners have relatively small parcels. A “small” parcel size is not defined, but often considered to be less than 10 acres, or less than 50 acres.
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Forest Succession – The succession of plant communities is a process that has drawn attention from woodlot owners, ecologists and foresters for decades.
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Logs to Lumber – Wise Use of Renewable Resources – A common feature of managed woods, and an aspect that has made them popular among farmers, woodlot owners and maple producers is the potential to harvest logs and produce boards.
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Integrated Vegetation Management – controlling undesirable woody plants in the forest  – American beech and many other native and non-native woody plants can dominate a woodland, exclude or limit the regeneration of desired plant species, and limit the biodiversity of the site.
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Maintaining a Healthy Sugarbush – A sugarbush is a special type of woodland. Woodlands include a complex mixture of natural processes and attributes such as soil type, elevation, tree species, types of wildlife, history of use, tree age and more. 
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Mixing herbicides – starting and ending concentrations – Interfering plants can complicate the plans of woodland owners and foresters to regenerate desirable trees species, or otherwise enjoy the benefits of their investment. In some circumstances mechanical or organic methods can be used to control interfering plants.
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Ho to Use Soils information for Woodlot Management  – An understanding of forest soils will hlep owners manage their woods for improved tree health and more efficient growth of trees.
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Other articles available here.

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