Use NNY Corn Evaluation to Select Seed, Feed Cows, Sell to Ethanol Producers

The evaluation of 103 commercial corn hybrids in trials funded by the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is now posted at www.nnyagdev.org. The trials under localized growing conditions help farmers select the corn hybrids best suited to their soils, agronomic practices, and needs, including use of the corn in a dairy cow diet and for production for sale to ethanol producers.

“Over the past 20 years, corn acres harvested as grain in the six-county Northern New York region have doubled, reflecting availability of hybrids with good yield and adaptation in this shorter-season area. Highly productive grain hybrids that perform in Northern New York allow farmers there to take advantage of corn grain and ethanol markets,” said project leader Dr. Margaret E. Smith, a plant breeding and genetics professor at Cornell University Smith.

Project collaborator Joe Lawrence, a dairy forage specialist with the Cornell University PRO-DAIRY program, “A focus by the seed industry on silage-specific corns has increased the need for independent evaluation of the corns’ traits, particularly to determine their merit in a dairy feeding program.”

Cornell PRO-DAIRY Director Thomas Overton notes, “We use the data from the Northern New York corn hybrid trials, and those conducted elsewhere in New York State, to evaluate how those hybrids will interact in a lactating cow feed ration and how that ration may influence expected cow performance and milk production.”

The 2017 hybrid evaluation trials, planted at the Cornell Willsboro Research Farm in Essex County, W. H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute in Clinton County, and Greenwood Farm in St. Lawrence County, evaluated 103 hybrids ranging from 80-day to 110-day maturity corns.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program project report notes that data on yield-to-moisture ratio comprises one of the best guides for selecting hybrids with excellent grain yield and appropriate maturity for Northern New York growing conditions. Grain yield is an important contributor to silage yield and quality and a consideration for farmers interested in selling their corn grain for feed or ethanol production

For silage, collaboration by hybrid evaluation projects across the Northeast, including the trials in Northern New York, continue to focus on key quality parameters’ related to fiber and starch digestibility.

Smith cautions that farmers should select hybrids based on multi-year and multi-location data whenever possible.

“Any hybrid can have a banner year or banner environment, but not necessarily hold up over different locations and growing seasons. Selections are best judged with several years of data under the regionalized growing conditions and the knowledge of one’s own soils, climate, and farm environment,” says Smith.

Multi-year corn hybrid evaluation data are available in the Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management. For assistance, contact Cornell Cooperative Extension NNY Field Crops Specialists Mike Hunter, 315-788-8602, or Kitty O’Neil, 315-854-1218.

Farmers in Northern New York have harvested an average of 145,000 acres of corn annually for grain and silage over the past four years.

Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Learn more at www.nnyagdev.org.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Capital Area Ag Report – August 15, 2017

Here is this week’s Ag Report: The Ag Report, 8-15-2017

Topics in this issue:
Advice for a difficult crop year.
Grain Bin Safety
Winter Rye Varieties
Fall Forages

Aaron Gabriel
Sr. Extension Resource Educator, Agronomy
Cornell Cooperative Extension
415 Lower Main St.
Hudson Falls, NY 12839
518-380-1496 cell
518-746-2560 office
adg12@cornell.edu
www.fieldcrops.org

Cornell Cooperative Extension
Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program
http://blogs.cornell.edu/capitalareaagandhortprogram/

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Corn Hybrid Trial Results Help Northern NY Farmers Select Seed

Northern NY farmers Dan and Andrew Reed check a past year’s corn crop. Photo: Brian P. Whattam

Northern New York farmers harvest approximately 13 percent of the total corn acreage in New York State. To help growers select the highest yielding corn varieties for planting, the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program funds Cornell University field trials that evaluate not only yield, but crop vigor, moisture, standability, and other plant health factors that influence the opportunity to grow a high quality, productive crop.

The results of the 2016 field trials with 50 early-maturing hybrids on farms in Madrid and Chazy, NY, and 16 medium-early hybrids in Madrid by Cornell Professor of Plant Breeding and Genetics Dr. Margaret E. Smith are posted in the Field Crops: Corn section of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program website at www.nnyagdev.org.

An evaluation of leaf disease development was planned as part of the 2016 hybrids trial, however, generally due to dry conditions throughout the growing season in Northern New York, no significant leaf or insect pressure was found at either the Chazy or Madrid site.

Smith notes, “Growers should always choose hybrids based on multiple years of evaluation and multi-location data whenever possible since any hybrid can have a banner year or banner environment one year but not necessarily hold up over a range of different growing seasons.”

The results of corn grain hybrid testing in Northern New York since 2004 are posted at www.nnyagdev.org.

The farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is a research and technical assistance program serving all agricultural sectors in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis, and St. Lawrence counties. Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Senate and administered through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

2016 Corn Silage Variety Trial Results

In 2016 a commitment was made at Cornell to resume corn silage trials on a more limited basis with the hope to expand locations and hybrid numbers in coming years.  Need to give thanks here to folks like Joe Lawrence, Tom Overton and Margaret Smith from PRO-DAIRY, Department of Animal Science and Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics for their time and expertise to get these trials up and running again.

Within the results you will still see silage yield info, but a more intensive effort has been made to translate the forage quality tests of each hybrid into milk production, another and very important measure of performance.

The results and more information are at the link below and a complete report is expected in the coming weeks:

http://bit.ly/2f7WBef

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How Well Will Corn Grow in Northern NY? NNYADP Field Data Now Available

Northern New York farmers grow 156,221 acres of corn; five of the six northernmost counties each grow more than 24,000 acres of corn, according to the 2012 Census of Agriculture. Corn is an essential feed crop for the Northern New York agricultural industry. To help farmers decide which corn hybrids have the best chance to produce high yield and high quality under Northern New York growing conditions, the farmer-driven Northern New York Agricultural Development Program, NNYADP, funds annual corn variety trials.

The results of the 2014 on-farm corn hybrid variety trials, conducted in St. Lawrence and Clinton counties, are now available online at www.nnyagdev.org.

Seed companies provided early maturing and medium-early maturing corn seed for the 2014 evaluation under the shorter Northern New York growing season as compared to more southern locations in New York State.

Lead researcher Dr. Margaret E. Smith, Cornell University Plant Breeding and Genetics, Ithaca, NY, notes, ‘The 2014 trials included longer-season corn hybrids that many Northern New York growers had found that they can use in light of the recent warmer and longer growing seasons in the region. As it turned out, 2014 was not one of those extra-long seasons in much of the Northern New York region.’

The data from the Northern New York trials is used in the development of the annual Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management for growers statewide.

Another NNYADP-funded project conducted field surveys of farms across the region to build a two-year database of common and newly-emerging diseases in corn and soybean crops.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program provides small grants for on-farm research and technical assistance projects in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. Success stories and research results are posted at www.nnyagdev.org.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email