NY wheat producers: make your fungicide decisions soon!

Fusarium HeadblightBased upon Oneida County CCE observations, wheat should be at flag leaf stage early next week.  As such, now is the time to make decisions on fungicide applications for fusarium head blight.  Below are the guidelines for wheat fungicide decisions.

 

 

Guidelines for Wheat Fungicide Decisions

(Taken from Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management)

 Does the crop have a reasonable yield potential?

Assess the crop in early May (stem elongation stages) for adequate stand (density of approximately 30 strong stems per foot of row for 7-inch rows on good soils) and plant vigor. If the stand is sparse or plants are not vigorous or show widespread symptoms, fungicide application should not be considered further.

____ Yes    ___ No

Have foliar diseases been observed before flag (last) leaf emergence?

Assess upper three leaves for symptoms and signs of powdery mildew, leaf spots, or leaf rust in early to mid-May, before flag leaf emergence. If disease (any amount) is observed on approximately 50 percent of main tillers, averaged across the field, a spray should be considered now. This threshold is exceeded in less than 50 percent of location/year situations in New York, so there is a significant risk of making an unnecessary fungicide application.

____ Yes   ___ No

Have foliar diseases been observed during head emergence?

Assess upper two leaves for foliar diseases in late May to early June; if disease (any amount) is observed on approximately 50 percent of main tillers, a spray should be considered now. Fungicide applications made after early June may control some diseases but are unlikely to produce significant yield benefits.

___ Yes  ___ No

Are climatic predictions conducive for further disease development?

Powdery mildew development is reduced dramatically once the average daily temperature rises above 70˚F; this disease often disappears by June. Severe leaf spot development is favored by extended periods of wet weather; it may be insignificant if dry weather persists in May and June. Listen for regional advisories on the threat from leaf rust; rust inoculum often builds up in areas to the south and west of New York and is deposited here by thunderstorms in June or July. In addition to disease observations, use long-range local weather forecasts in making your spray decision.

What is your short to medium term weather conditions?

Have I selected fungicides appropriate for the disease spectrum and have I read the label carefully?

Be sure that the materials you spray will be effective against the range of diseases found in your field; e.g., some products effective against powdery mildew are ineffective against leaf spots or vice versa. Check in the Cornell University Guide for Integrated Crop Management: http://ipmguidelines.org/FieldCrops/Chapters/CH05/CH05-7.aspx

 Is the spray decision consistent with my perception of risk?

A simple formula for evaluating the relative economics of a fungicide spray is: Relative Profit = (Grain Yield Increase x Grain Price) – (Cost of Fungicide + Application Costs). If ground spray rigs are used, the yield lost to wheel traffic should also be factored in. Each of these variables influences the relative economics of fungicide application as illustrated in Table 5.7.3. of the Cornell University Guide for Integrated Crop Management: http://ipmguidelines.org/FieldCrops/Chapters/CH05/CH05-7.aspx.

Relative Profit = (Grain Yield Increase _____ x Grain Price _____) – (Cost of Fungicide  _____ + Application Costs ________)

New York State Weekly Weather Outlook – May 15, 2014

Jessica Spaccio, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week felt like summer with some areas reaching over 10 degrees above normal.  Areas in the far north and in the Catskills were 4-6 degrees above normal.  Precipitation varied widely, with isolated areas getting less than a quarter inch, others getting over 4 inches (flooding in Penn Yan) and the majority of areas falling in the half to two inch range.  Base 50 growing degree days picked up with most areas in the 50-90 range, colder areas below 50 and over 90 along the Finger Lakes and Hudson River.

*Flash Flood Watch posted for Western to Central NY ) http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=bgm&wwa=flash%20flood%20watch)

Hazardous Weather Outlook for other areas (http://forecast.weather.gov/wwamap/wwatxtget.php?cwa=bgm&wwa=hazardous%20weather%20outlook)

Heavy rain event Thursday night into Friday. Then near normal temperatures with cloudy but mostly dry conditions.

Today will continue to have above normal temperatures ranging from the mid 70’s to low 80’s.  Showers & thunderstorms associated with a cold front will move across the state beginning this evening in Western NY and slowly moving eastward bringing widespread rainfall for Friday.  Overnight temperatures will be in the lower 50’s in western NY, but warmer in the mid 50’s to low 60’s east of the cold front.

The cold front will bring a rainy, cooler day with highs in the upper 50’s to upper 60’s (cooler in western NY and warmer in eastern NY).  There is potential for a heavy rainfall event.  Expecting 1-2” with localized heavier amounts.  Overnight temperatures will be cooler, in the low 40’s to mid 50’s.  Rainfall will continue in eastern NY as the front moves out.

Behind the cold front, Saturday will be cooler but a mostly dry day with a just a few scattered showers possible.  Temperatures will be in the upper 50’s to upper 60’s.  Overnight temperatures will be cooler yet, in the 40’s.

Sunday’s highs will be in the 60’s with a chance of scattered showers, but dry for most areas.  Lows will be in the 40’s.

Monday’s temperatures will again be in the 60’s with scattered showers possible and lows in the 40’s.

Tuesday’s highs will be in the 60’s with lows in the 40’s.

Wednesday will warm up a bit with highs in the upper 60’s and low 70’s.  Lows will be in the mid 40’s to low 50’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1 ¼ to 3 inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (May22-28) is showing normal temperatures for most of the state; above normal for the southern Hudson Valley and Catskill regions.  Precipitation outlook is above normal.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:  http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:  http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday):  http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Report – May 9, 2014

May 9, 2014
May 9, 2014

Get the full issue or subscribe to the online version to receive notifications of new reports including Videos from the Field throughout the summer.

In this issue:

  • Thirteenth Year of the Pest Report
  • View from the Field
  • Weather Outlook – May 8, 2014
  • Timothy Stand Assessment – Cereal Rust Mite?
  • Alfalfa Winter Kill and Root Rots
  • Growing Degree Days/Alfalfa Weevil/Black Cutworm in NYS
  • Clipboard Checklist

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New York State Weekly Weather Outlook – May 8, 2014

Jessica Spaccio, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

April temperatures were below normal for most of the state, but closer to normal than the winter had been.  April precipitation was split, with areas around the Great Lakes being above normal and central areas being below normal.  Base 50 growing degree-days accumulated since March 15 are below 50 for most of the state, with some areas in the 50-80 range.

Slightly above normal temperatures with some showers.

Today will be mostly cloudy with a chance of showers or an isolated thunderstorm.  Temperatures will be in the mid 60’s to low 70’s.  Overnight temperatures will be above normal in the mid 50’s for most of the state, mid 40’s for the Northern counties.

A warm front overnight Thursday will bring cloudy skies and a chance of showers for Friday, but temperatures will be in the upper 60’s to possible low 80’s! Lows will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 60’s to mid 70’s but with showers likely.  Overnight temperatures will be in the low to mid 50’s.

Sunday will be partly sunny with highs in the upper 60’s to mid 70’s.  Lows will be in the low to mid 50’s.

Monday highs will be in the low 70’s to low 80’s with a chance of showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be in the low to mid 50’s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 60’s to mid 70’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be throughout the 50’s.

Wednesday will be slightly cooler with temperatures in the mid 60’s to low 70’s with showers likely.  Lows will be throughout the 50’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from ¾ of an inch to 1 ½ of an inch.

The 8-14 day outlook (May15-21) is showing below normal temperatures and above normal precipitation.  The May/June/July outlook has the Hudson Valley and Catskills in above normal temperatures, but no indication for the rest of the state and not indication for precipitation for any area.   As the 3-month outlooks progress, the area of above normal temperatures expands into NY and by the August/September/October outlook the entire state is showing above normal.  There is no indication for precipitation in any of the outlooks.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks: http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday): http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html