Northeast Cover Crops Council Virtual Conference – March 4, 2021

Contributed by the Northeast Cover Crop Council

SAVE THE DATE

March 4, 2021

Northeast Cover Crops Council’s First Virtual Conference

Mark your calendars to join your fellow cover crop enthusiasts for a day of interactive online presentations, posters, panels, and training sessions.

CCA CEUs will be available. Registration opens soon, $75 per ticket.

Contact Victoria.Ackroyd@usda.gov for more information.

New this year: submit a cover crop video to our contest!

Get filming this fall! Highlight and show off your latest cover crop planting/project.

Submit an ePoster!

Are you interested in sharing a poster on an ongoing project? Prepare a poster to share during our online poster session.

Are you interested in becoming a Sponsor?

Visit http://northeastcovercrops.com/ for upcoming details.

Northeast Cover Crops Council’s 2021 Video Contest

Contributed by the Northeast Cover Crops Council

Show off your latest cover crop planting/project at our first ever Virtual Conference on March 4, 2021. Get filming this fall! Upon submittal, your video will be entered into our Cover Crop Video Contest where Conference attendees will vote on their favorite videos during the event!

Visit http://northeastcovercrops.com/ for upcoming details on how and when to submit your video.

Details to Include in Your Video:

    • Tell us your name, the farm/site name, and the general location.
    • Highlight a current/ongoing project/planting, or re-purpose an older video you have on cover crops.
    • Explain why you chose that particular cover crop/mix or project, and what the specific goals are, if any, that you hope to meet through planting this cover crop (i.e. nitrogen fixation, improve soil health, reduce erosion, etc.).
    • Describe equipment you are using, and any relevant information about the site (i.e. the history of that field, cash crop, tillage practices, how long it has been cover cropped, etc.).
    • Videos should be no more than 5 minutes in length.

Video Tips & Tricks:

    • Smart Phone videos are great. However always shoot in landscape style, avoid shooting vertical.
    • Consider having someone else hold the camera/phone, and to brace it on a stationary surface to minimize shakiness. A tripod or stabilizing device can be very useful.
    • Be sure you are at FULL battery before recording, and if possible, bring a backup battery/power source.
    • Before recording, make sure you know your video goals—what do you want the audience to know? You may want to write down key points to capture/say before recording so you don’t miss anything.
    • Short, concise videos are generally preferred.
    • Consider the weather—wind can impact the microphones sound by adding background noise. Use a Bluetooth microphone with a wind screen if possible when filming in the field.
    • If you want to take a few shots (or insert pictures/text) there are many different free, intuitive video editing software available to edit those together into one video, such as MiniTool Movie Maker.
    • Files must be saved in MP4 format.
    • Get creative and have fun!

Helpful Resources for Creating Videos:

Additional questions? Please contact Catherine Davidson at catherine.davidson@uvm.edu or (802) 524-6501 ext. 445.

USDA-NASS: New York Small Grains

New York growers harvested 7.92 million bushels of wheat in 2020, with an average yield of 66 bushels per acre, according to Donnie Fike, state statistician of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, New York Field Office.  Harvested area, at 120 thousand acres was up 54 thousand acres from last year.

New York oat production was estimated at 1.70 million bushels in 2020. Yield was estimated at 53 bushels per acre, down 7 bushels per acre from last year. Harvested area, at 32 thousand acres, was 7 thousand acres below last year.

Barley production was estimated at 300 thousand bushels, up 44% from 2019. The average yield, which is a record high for the state, at 60 bushels per acre, was up 8 bushels per acre from the previous year. Producers seeded 9 thousand acres in 2020, down from 10 thousand acres in 2019. Harvested area, at 5 thousand acres, was up 1 thousand acres from 2019.

All reports are available electronically, at no cost, on the NASS web site: www.nass.usda.gov. Both national and state specific reports are available via a free e-mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit www.nass.usda.gov and click on “National” or “State” in upper right corner above “search” box to create an account and select the reports you would like to receive.

For the complete “Small Grains Annual Summary” report, go to:
https://usda.library.cornell.edu/concern/publications/5t34sj573

The “Small Grains Annual Summary” report and all other NASS reports are available online at www.nass.usda.gov.

Weather Outlook – September 24, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 4 to 10 degrees below normal. Precipitation has ranged from 0 to 0.25 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from less than 10-40.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 23 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 23 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 23 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 23

Today temperatures be in the mid 70s to near 80; some isolated non-severe thunderstorms and showers are possible. Overnight lows will be in the 50s with scattered showers.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to low 80s, isolated showers are possible in the North Country. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s to low 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 70s to near 80. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s with showers possible.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 60s to mid 70s with rain expected. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 60s with scattered showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 50s to low 60s with showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.50” to over 1.50” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (October 1-7) favors below-normal temperatures and near-normal to below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Soybean Harvest Aids

Contributed by Mike Stanyard, Cornell Cooperative Extension, NWNY Team

soybean field
Lots of weeds in this soybean field that suffered from drought stress.
Photo: M. Stanyard / CCE NWNY Team

Many of the early maturity soybeans have been harvested and plenty are starting to turn yellow.  One thing that has been really noticeable is the amount of weedy soybean fields.  There are plenty of foxtail, lambsquarters and marestail that are way above the beans and still green.  Much of this was due to the dry conditions around the region and rows that never completely closed canopy.  By the time harvest occurs the weed seeds will probably be mature but how tough will harvest be with all of those weeds still growing?  There are a couple products we can apply as harvest aids but it is usually only for weed burndown not speed up plant maturation.  Many of the herbicide label restrictions do not allow application until plants are fully mature.  Below is a list of labeled herbicide options from Penn State Extension with important restrictions from the label.  Here is the link to the full article, https://extension.psu.edu/harvest-aid-options-in-corn-and-soybeans.

  • Aim 2EC — Apply 1.5 fl oz/acre as a harvest aid to desiccate certain broadleaf weeds. Application shall be made when the crop is mature and the grain has begun to dry down and at least 3 days before harvest. Apply in 10 gal/A water. Include necessary adjuvants and make sure spray coverage is sufficient otherwise poor control will result. Do not feed treated soybean forage or hay to livestock.
  • Clarity — Apply 8 fl oz to 2 quarts after soybean pods have reached a mature brown color and at least 75% leaf drop has occurred. Wait at least 7 days before harvest. Use a non-ionic surfactant or crop oil concentrate plus nitrogen solution in the spray solution. Do not feed soybean fodder or hay following a preharvest application.
  • Defol 5L — Can be applied to desiccate problem weeds in early maturing soybean. Apply 4.8 qt/acre, 7-10 days before harvest in 20 gallons/acre water. No adjuvant is recommended. Do not graze treated field or feed treated fodder.
  • Glyphosate — For pre-harvest, glyphosate may be applied to Roundup Ready and conventional soybeans after 80% leaf drop (loss of all green color). Apply up to 0.75 lb ae/acre (32 fl oz of a 3 lb ae/gal formulation) in 10-20 gallons of water/acre to control weeds that may interfere with harvest or to control perennials such as quackgrass or Canada thistle but will not control glyphosate-resistant weeds or dry down Roundup Ready varieties. Allow a minimum of 7 days between application and harvest. Use of a non-ionic surfactant plus ammonium sulfate in the spray solution may improve control. Do not graze or harvest the treated crop for livestock feed within 25 days of application. Do not use on soybeans grown for seed.
  • Gramoxone SL — Apply 8 to 16 fl. oz/acre plus nonionic surfactant (1 qt/100 gallons of spray) to soybean plants that are mature (65% or more of the seed pods have reached mature brown color or seed moisture is 30% or less. Do not apply within 15 days of harvest and do not graze or harvest for forage or hay.
  • Sharpen — Apply 1 to 2 fl. oz/acre after physiological maturity when greater than 50% leaf drop has occurred, and remaining leaves are yellow and at least 3 days before harvest. Include MSO plus AMS or UAN to improve performance.

Weather Outlook – September 17, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees below normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to 2 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 10-110.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 16GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 16 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 16 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 16Today temperatures be in the 60s to mid 70s with scattered light rain showers. Overnight lows will be in the 30s to mid 40s; patchy frost possible in the North Country.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 50s to 60s with breezy conditions and some light showers in eastern areas but dry in most places. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 30s to low 40s with frost possible.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s with breezy conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 30s with potential for frost.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 50s to mid 60s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 30s to around 40 with frost possible.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 60s to around 70. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 30s to mid 40s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 60s to low 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.00” to over 0.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 24-30) favors above-normal temperatures and below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – September 10, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to 2 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50-150.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 29 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 9 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 9 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 9

Today temperatures be in the low 70s to 80s. Showers and thunderstorms are possible mostly in eastern areas from a passing cold front; locally heavy rainfall possible. Overnight lows will be in the mid 40s to 50s.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 60s to mid 70s with sunny skies. Overnight temperatures will be in the low 40s to low 50s, some 30s possible.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 50s with showers and thunderstorms.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 60s to low 80s with widespread rain and some thunderstorms from an approaching cold front. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s, some 30s possible.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 30s to 40s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 60s to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 40s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.10” to over 2.50” inches, with the highest amounts expected in southeast NY.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 17-23) favors near- to above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

NY Corn Dry Down Observations – 9/3/2020

Contributed by Joe Lawrence – Dairy Forage Systems Specialist with Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY

I have been talking about how this season is reminiscent of 2018 for many areas of the state. Visually, we saw a very green healthy crop, but ears dried down fast and caught people off guard.  And, the same scenario seems to be in play this year given a number of reports I have seen as well as what’s been observed at some of our research plots.

I have also taken note of how some fields which received some drought ending rain after tasseling reminded me more of 2016 when we saw slower than normal dry down because the crop seemed to try to make up for lost ground during ear fill.

After a visit to our plot in Madrid, NY, the plot appears to look pretty good despite very low rainfall this year, which is acceptable given the circumstances. Of course, it’s not going to set any yield records but is decent corn with a good ear.

Today, the plot will hit 800 GDD’s since tasseling.  Based on previous research from Bill Cox, that would suggest it should be getting close to 32% DM. We know there is some variability in this number, but it has been pretty close with some of our other locations this year.

I took 2 samples when I visited Madrid  to check whole plant DM.

    • 97 day – 28% DM
    • 100 day – 25% DM

These numbers fall well below where we would expect given the tasseling date and GDD accumulation.  And as such, this location certainly seems to be lining up with what we observed in 2016.

For more on this topic, check out the 1st Episode, Corn Silage 2020 Season Recap, of the Cornell PRO-DAIRY Corn Silage Harvest Considerations Podcast Series.

 

Weather Outlook – September 3, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 6 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than a quarter of an inch to an isolated area of over 3 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 40-140.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Sept 2 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Sept 2

Today temperatures will warm into the mid 70s to mid 80s with a slight chance for afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s with high pressure bringing fair weather to most areas, northern NY could see some light rain; there will be gusty conditions in the afternoon. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s with showers possible east of Lake Ontario.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to upper 70s with sunny skies for along the southern border and increasing clouds northward with a few light rain shows possible in northern NY. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid to upper 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s with a slight chance of showers.

Monday temperatures will be in the 70s with showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with humid conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s. Heavy rain and thunderstorms are possible; there is a lot of uncertainty of when and if this will happen. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0” to over 0.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 10-16) favors near- to above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – August 27, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from less than a quarter of an inch to an isolated area of over 3 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 70-170.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 26 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 26

Today some early morning showers and thunderstorms from a warm front. Temperatures will warm into the mid 80s to low 90s where the skies clear in southern areas of the state, but only warm into the low to mid 70s in northern areas. A cold front will move through in the afternoon to early evening causing a probable severe weather outbreak. Risks include wind gusts of 70mph or higher, hail larger than 2”, and tornadoes. Heavy rainfall and flash flooding is also possible. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with severe weather threat generally ending by 9pm and only lingering rain showers.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with cloudy conditions and increasing chances of showers and thunderstorms from another warm front. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with tropical moisture moving in.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 70s, some southeast areas will climb into the 80s, with a chance for severe storms and will have tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Laura. Heavy rain and flash flooding are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Sunday highs will be in the upper 60s to mid 70s with scattered showers possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 60s to mid 70s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 70s with scattered shower and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s with showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 1.25” to over 4.00” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (September 3-9) favors above-normal temperatures and favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu