Weather Outlook – August 13, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to over 4 inches in isolated areas. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 90-190.

GDD Base 48  Mar 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 12 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 12

Today temperatures will be in the 80s with mostly dry conditions; southeast NY could see an isolated shower or thunderstorm. Overnight lows will be in the low to mid 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the low to mid 80s with a few scattered showers in eastern NY. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the low to mid 80s with some scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Sunday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with showers likely in western NY, and scattered showers for the rest of the state. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 70s with scattered showers and thunderstorms from a passing cold front, the timing of this is still uncertain. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 70s and mostly dry. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s and dry. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50s to low 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.25” to 1.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (August 20-26) favors above-normal temperatures and favors near- to below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – August 6, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from near normal to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a quarter of an inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 48 May 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - Aug 5 GDD Base 50 May 1 - Aug 5

Today will be cool and dry with temperatures in the mid 70s to low 80s. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s with scattered showers possible.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with some lingering morning showers and then afternoon scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Sunday will be sunny with highs in the 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the mid 80s to low 90s with increasing humidity and a slight chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 80s to low 90s with a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms, some storms could be severe. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s to low 90s with a slight chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.10” to 1.25” inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (August13-19) favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – July 30, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 8 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 March 1 - July 29 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 29 GDD Base 50 March 1 - July 29 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 29

Today temperatures will in the mid 70s to upper 80s with a chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight lows will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the uppers 70s to mid 80s with mostly sunny skies, isolated showers and thunderstorms are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to 80s with gradually increasing clouds and slight chance for afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the low to mid 60s.

Sunday will be with highs in the upper 70s to mid 80s with showers and thunderstorms likely; heavy downpours are possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 60s with rain continuing.

Monday temperatures will be in the upper 70s to mid 80s with on and off scattered showers. Track of Tropical Storm Isaias could bring heavy rainfall to parts of NY, lots of uncertainty at this time. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with on and off scattered showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 70s to low 80s with slight chance for showers. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.75 inch to over 3inches. There is the potential for higher totals depending on the track of moisture from Tropical Storm Isaias.

The 8-14 day outlook (August 6-12) slightly favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation for all but western to central NY.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Weather Outlook – July 23, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 6 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a hundredth of an inch to near 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-210.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - July 22 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 22 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - July 22 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 22

Today temperatures will in the 80s with humid conditions. Scattered showers and thunderstorms are expected, some could reach severe stage with isolated damaging winds, hail, and localized heavy rainfall. Overnight lows will be in the upper 50s to upper 60s.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to mid 80s with clearing conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Saturday temperatures will be in upper 70s to low 90s with increased humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Sunday will be with highs in the 80s to low 90s with increased humidity. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s to low 70s with showers possible.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s to low 90s. A cold front will bring showers and thunderstorms.  Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 70s and 80s with scattered showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50s to mid 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from 0.5 inch to 1.75 inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 30-August 5) slightly favors above-normal temperatures and slightly favors below-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

Drought-Stressed Soybeans: Keep an Eye Out for Spider Mites

Jaime Cummings and Ken Wise (NYS IPM), Mike Stanyard (CCE NWNY), and Elson Shields (Cornell Entomology)

soybean field and leaf
Spider mite damage to edge of soybean field and individual leaf (photos by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Widespread drought conditions are stressing the crops, and may lead to flare ups of two-spotted spider mites in some soybean fields.  We’ve already heard some reports of low to moderate spider mite infestations in a few fields in western NY, and could expect more in coming weeks if the weather stays hot and dry.  If left unchecked, even a moderate infestation can result in 10-15% yield loss.  As with any pest, it’s best to understand why they are problematic and what the best management practices are.

Magnified photo
Two-spotted spider mites through magnifier (photo by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Spider mites are tiny, eight-legged critters that can spin webs like spiders.  In fact, they spin little web parachutes to catch the wind and blow into your fields.  They prefer hot, dry conditions, where they can reproduce rapidly with multiple generations completed every 7 – 21 days.  Infestations typically start at field margins, usually in the lower canopy, but can quickly spread throughout a field.  The spider mites are difficult to see individually with the naked eye, but their feeding causes obvious damage.  Feeding injury results in stippling (or speckled-like) appearance of leaves, as the mites colonize and feed on the lower surfaces of soybean leaves.  These speckles start out as almost a silver color, but later can turn yellow or brown.  Severe feeding damage can cause entire leaves to become curled and necrotic, reducing photosynthesis, and potentially even resulting in death of severely affected plants.  Webbing will be obvious on the underside of infested leaves, as may be the small, white shed skins from molting individuals.  You can shake a damaged plant onto a piece of paper or hood of your vehicle to knock the mites off to see them.  Check out this video of spider mite activity on a corn leaf by Mike Stanyard, CCE.

Closeup of soybean leaves
Spider mite damaged leaf with mites on webbing, and mites congregating at tip of leaf (photos by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

The mites have piercing-sucking mouth parts, which penetrate the leaves and consume the plant sap, similar to how aphids feed.  This makes things worse for the already drought-stressed plants.  Damaged plants may be prematurely defoliated or stunted, resulting in fewer pods and fewer beans per pod.  This can all happen very quickly when conditions are ripe for population explosions of this pest.

soybean leaf
Soybean leaf heavily infested with spider mites (photo by Mike Stanyard, CCE)

Spider mites are always present at low levels in crops and surrounding weeds or hedgerows.  They are typically kept in check by natural populations of parasitic fungi and beneficial insects.  Unfortunately, the hot, dry weather that favors spider mite outbreaks isn’t favorable for these naturally occurring biocontrol agents.   Staying ahead of the pest by knowing when to expect them and keeping weedy field margins mowed to minimize reservoir habitats are a good way to start.  The best and easiest way to manage spider mites is with persistent rainfall, but we can’t control the weather!  Pay attention to the forecast, and if moderate moisture is predicted, you may be able to avoid taking other action.  But, if the forecast is for continued hot and dry conditions, then you should scout your soybean fields weekly.  There is no specific economic or action threshold for spider mites.  Scouting to catch damage early and knowing the forecast will help you make the best decision on whether or not to spray.  If you catch them early, you may be able to spray just the affected field margin and approximately the surrounding 100 feet to contain them.  For small fields, you may need to treat the entire field.  It’s important to know that none of the insecticides target the eggs, so there may be a resurgence following the first spray if there are many eggs present and if favorable conditions persist.  Below is a table of registered insecticides labeled for spider mites in NY as of July 2020.  Remember to read and follow all label instructions when using any pesticides.

Table of insecticides registered for use on spider mites in NYS

Disclaimer: Read pesticide labels prior to use. The information contained here is not a substitute for a pesticide label. Trade names used herein are for convenience only; no endorsement of products is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products implied. Laws and labels change. It is your responsibility to use pesticides legally. Always consult with your local Cooperative Extension office for legal and recommended practices and products. cce.cornell.edu/localoffices

NNYADP: Nitrogen Efficiency Research Keys on Farm Site Differences

Man walking behind harvester in corn field
High-quality, high-yield corn production is the goal of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program-funded precision nitrogen use research by Cornell University researchers, seen here sampling in a NNY cornfield. Photo: Joe Lawrence

Cornell University researchers with a grant from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program (NNYADP) say individual farm growing conditions and field management may play a larger role than previously credited in maximizing corn production. The research team’s latest variety trials and nitrogen uptake efficiency report is posted on the NNYADP website at www.nnyagdev.org under the About: Projects: 2019 tab.

“Our initial assessments show site-to-site differences are much greater than genetic differences between corn hybrid selections within a site,” said Joseph Lawrence, a dairy forage systems specialist with the Cornell University PRO-DAIRY program.

Lawrence leads the NNYADP-funded research conducted in collaboration with the Cornell Nutrient Management Spear Program (NMSP). The project is evaluating the use of nitrogen balance and efficiency indicators to enhance precision nitrogen management across sites and corn hybrids. This has the potential to simultaneously advance agricultural environmental stewardship and reduce the production cost of this key dairy crop.

Data from corn silage variety field trials at a northern New York dairy farm in St. Lawrence County and the Willsboro Research Farm in Essex County from 2016 through 2019 were analyzed to evaluate the impact of yield, crop quality, soil health, soil types (5), and weather factors on nitrogen balances, with a specific focus on how much nitrogen is needed for optimal production.

The project established six nitrogen (N) balance indicators, including a basic field N balance that reflects the difference between N applied with fertilizer and manure and N removed with corn silage harvest. Five additional measures of N use efficiency are also under evaluation.

“Understanding the variability in nitrogen use efficiency, field nitrogen balances, and yield grown under the same management conditions and on the same soil type is important to helping growers achieve efficiency in both crop production and resource stewardship,” Lawrence explained.

The multi-variety, multi-year, multi-site data suggest that the highest yielding crops tend to have the highest N use efficiency as well.

“We want to know if the corn yields were a result of correctly, under- or over-fertilizing the field sites. The goal is to reach optimal resource-use, production, and stewardship efficiency with nitrogen application farm-by-farm, field-by-field to produce the highest quality, highest yield crop,” Lawrence said.

With the 2019 field trials on the northern NY farms, the researchers have begun evaluating crop yield in relation to corn stalk nitrate test (CSNT) levels.

“The preliminary results of our corn stalk nitrate testing showed variability in CSNT across corn silage hybrids with a slight hint of a trend toward lower CSNT levels for higher-yielding hybrids. We are looking into the use of a yield-to-CSNT ratio to further explain if nitrogen management was on target. We will add more data this year to draw more substantive conclusions,” said Quirine M. Ketterings, Ph.D., director, Cornell NMSP, Ithaca, N.Y.

The data from this NNYADP project add to a statewide initiative to develop a corn silage yield potential database.

Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by the New York State Legislature and administered by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Learn more at www.nnyagdev.org.

Weather Outlook – July 16, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 to 8 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from half an inch to over 4 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 120-200.

GDD Base 48 March 1 - July 15 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 15 GDD Base 50 March 1 - July 15 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 15

Today temperatures will be cooler, in the mid 70s to mid 80s with showers and thunderstorms moving across the state from west to east, with a second wave in the afternoon. Some storms could become severe with heavy rainfall, potential for localized flooding, and gusty winds. Overnight lows will be in the 60s with rain continuing.

Friday temperatures will be in the mid 70s to 80s with continued scattered showers and thunderstorms as a cold front passes; locally heavy downpours are expected in eastern areas. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50s to low 60s.

Saturday temperatures will climb to the mid 80s to near 90s with sunny skies. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Sunday will be hot & humid with highs in the upper 80s to mid 90s and chances for scattered showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon to evening hours. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the 80s with evening showers and thunderstorms possible.  Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s

Tuesday highs will be in the 80s with evening showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the 80s with showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from three quarters of an inch to two and a half inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 23-29) favors above-normal temperatures and near-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climod2.nrcc.cornell.edu

USDA to Survey County Small Grains Acreage and Production

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will survey producers throughout the U.S. as part of its County Agricultural Production Survey (CAPS). The survey will collect information on total acres planted and harvested, and total yield and production of small grains down to the county level.

“The data provided by producers will help Federal and State programs support the farmer,” said Kevin Pautler, deputy director of the NASS Northeastern Regional Field Office. “We hope every producer will take the time to respond if they receive this survey. Producers benefit when there are data available to help determine accurate loan rates, disaster payments, crop insurance price elections, and more. When enough producers respond to surveys, NASS is able to publish data. Without data, agencies such as USDA’s Risk Management Agency or Farm Service Agency may not have information on which to base the programs that serve those same producers.”

Within the next few weeks NASS representatives will contact selected growers to arrange telephone interviews to complete the survey.

NASS safeguards the privacy of all respondents and publishes only aggregate data, ensuring that no individual operation or producer can be identified.

Survey results will be published on the NASS Quick Stats database at https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov. For more information, please call the NASS Northeastern Regional Field Office at (800) 498-1518.

New restricted use insecticide registered for aphids on soybean

Contributed by Mike Helms, Pesticide Management Education Program

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) recently approved the registration of three insecticides containing the active ingredient afidopyrofen. These are the first products registered in New York State containing this active ingredient. Products registered include:

  • Sefina Inscalis Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-391) – registered for use on several agricultural crops including cucurbits, fruiting vegetables, tuberous and corm vegetables and soybean against various aphids and whiteflies.
  • Versys Inscalis Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-389) – registered for use on brassicas, leaf petiole and leafy vegetables, pome fruit, and stone fruit against various aphids and whiteflies.
  • Ventigra Insecticide (EPA Reg. No. 7969-393) – registered for use on ornamentals and vegetable transplants against aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs, and scale.

Note that all three of these products are restricted-use in New York State and their use in Nassau and Suffolk Counties are prohibited. The labels for these products also have NY-specific buffer zone requirements.

Copies of the approved labels for these products are available from the NYSDEC’s product registration website.

Questions should be directed to Cornell PMEP.

Weather Outlook – July 9, 2020

Contributed by NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal to 4 degrees above normal. Precipitation has ranged from a trace to 2 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 110-190.

GDD Base 48 Mar 1 - July 8 GDD Base 48 May 1 - July 8 GDD Base 50 Mar 1 - July 8 GDD Base 50 May 1 - July 8

Today will be hot & humid with temperatures in the mid 80s to mid 90s and isolated showers and thunderstorms; some storms will be capable of producing heavy downpours. Overnight lows will be in mid 60s to mid 70s.

Friday will be another hot & humid day with temperatures in the 90s. A coastal low will bring cloud cover and increased chances for showers and thunderstorms, most likely for eastern areas. There is a risk for flash flooding. Overnight temperatures will be in the 70s.

Saturday temperatures will be in the 80s. Some areas will have morning rain continuing from Friday night and more widespread afternoon showers and thunderstorms are likely. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Sunday will have afternoon showers and thunderstorms, with highs in the mid low to 80s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Monday temperatures will be in the low 80s with scattered thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Tuesday highs will be in the 80 with scattered afternoon showers and thunderstorms. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

Wednesday highs will be in the mid 80s to low 90s. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid to upper 60s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from half an inch to two and a half inches.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 16-22) favors above-normal temperatures with high probability. The precipitation outlook favors near- to slightly below-normal amounts.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu