Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

July 31, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Oneida County Weekly Crop Report – 7/28/2017

Oneida County Weekly Crop Report – 7/28/2017

PLH numbers have softened a bit…. Growers harvested and some fields were treated.

Soy bean aphid numbers remain low in most fields.

Big flight of western bean cutworm  identified in southern Oneida county.

Wheat harvest continues with good reports on both yield and quality.

Oat crop is starting to turn

Early planted corn fields are tasseling

Many soybeans are at full flower.

Some growers are preparing fields for summer seedings.

See the full Crop Report for more details.

Jeffrey J. Miller
Cornell Cooperative Extension Oneida County
Ag Program Leader
Agronomist
315-269-5599
jjm14@cornell.edu
121 Second St., Oriskany, NY 13424

July 28, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – July 28, 2017

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report – July 28, 2017

July 28, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Capital Area Ag Report – July 26, 2017

Capital Area Ag Report – July 26, 2017

Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program’s Weekly Ag Report.

Topics in this issue:

  • Corn diseases
  • Lessons of 2017 Weather
  • Small Grains

Aaron Gabriel
Sr. Extension Resource Educator, Agronomy

Cornell Cooperative Extension
415 Lower Main St.
Hudson Falls, NY 12839
518-380-1496 cell
518-746-2560 ofc
 adg12@cornell.edu
 www.fieldcrops.org

July 28, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – July 27, 2017

Weather Outlook – July 27, 2017

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 4 degrees below-normal to 2 degrees above-normal. Precipitation ranged from a quarter inch to over 4 inches (over 7” in Hammond!). Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 80 to 160.

Showers & thunderstorms today then mostly dry for the week!

Thursday temperatures will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s. Scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely as a frontal system moves through. Severs storm are possible for central to eastern NY, with heavy rain and damaging winds. Overnight lows will be in the 60’s.

Friday temperatures will be in the 70’s, with some leftover showers possible in southern areas of the state. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

Saturday’s highs will be in the 70’s with clearing skies and mostly dry conditions. Overnight temperatures will be in the 50’s.

Sunday, highs will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s and mostly sunny. Overnight temperatures will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

Monday’s highs will be in the upper 70’s to low 80’s with sunny and dry conditions. Lows will be in the low to mid 60’s.

Tuesday will have temperatures in the upper 70’s to low 80’s with isolated showers and thunderstorms possible.  Lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

Wednesday, temperatures will be in the upper 70’s to low 80’s with isolated showers and thunderstorms possible.  Lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from a trace to ½ ”.

The 8-14 day outlook (Aug 3-9) favors above-normal temperatures for southeast NY, and near-normal temperatures for the rest of the state; the outlook slightly favors above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

 

July 25, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on 2017 Corn Diseases and Plant Health in a Wet Growing Season

2017 Corn Diseases and Plant Health in a Wet Growing Season

Ken Wise, NYS IPM-Cornell University
Joe Lawrence, PRO-DAIRY-Cornell University

The current 2017 wet/rainy weather and high humidity can create a situation where diseases can become an issue in corn. While there are several foliar diseases that can occur on corn under these conditions, gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight have been especially problematic over the last several years. Gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight can cause yield losses and the risk of infection may be an issue this year. What should a grower do about it? While applying protective fungicides is an option, there are several things to consider before spraying. Here are a few steps to follow when making a decision.

  1. Scout fields for the gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight at tasseling. If there are lesions on leaves at or above the corn ear exceeding 5% of the plant leaf area consider a fungicide. If lesions develop later after tasseling, then economic benefits from using a fungicide will be less.
  2. Does your hybrid have at least moderate resistance? This can make a big difference in yield and likely will not require a fungicide application. Disease symptoms may be present in resistant corn, but a fungicide most likely will not increase yield.
  3. Crop rotation and tillage is an effective method to control the fungi. The longer the rotation the less inoculum will be on the surface. If you maintain no-tillage, zone-tillage or reduced tillage rotating away from corn for 2 years can help reduce pathogen populations.
  4. Fungicides can be very effective when disease exists above the economic threshold. However, fungicides are protective not curative, so applications need to be made before the full extent of disease damage is known. It is generally not economical to spray fungicide on silage corn.

Identification

Gray Leaf Spot (Cercospora zeae-maydis)

Early symptoms are yellow to tan lesions with a faint watery halo. As the lesion progresses, it turns brown and is rectangular in shape, between the veins. When fully developed the lesion can be 3 to 4 inches long and a 1/6 to 1/8 inch wide. The fungus can overwinter on corn debris left on the soil surface. Sporulation occurs during warm and humid weather in late spring. The spores can be transmitted by both wind and rain. In some cases gray leaf spot can reduce corn yields from 5 to 40 bushels per acre.

Northern Corn Leaf Blight- Exserohilum turcicum

The symptoms are long, cigar-shaped lesions that are about a 1/8 to ¼ inch wide. The lesions can be many inches long. Lesions are grayish-tan and have a pigmented border. There are numerous races of the pathogen, some of which overcome resistance genes deployed in many of the corn varieties grown in NY. The fungus overwinters on corn crop residue from previous years.

Other foliar diseases of corn to look out for this season

Plant Health
Certain fungicides now carry a label for plant health benefits when used at the V4-5 stage and, if warranted, again at tasseling. Product labels suggest potential yield and quality benefits from their use. Cornell University is conducting field evaluations to better understand the economic returns of using fungicides in this manner.

Forage Quality
There are numerous factors affecting the forage quality of corn silage. Major factors on overall quality include whole plant maturity at harvest, ear to stover ratio and seasonal weather patterns. A healthy plant with minimal damage to plant tissue is able to mature to desired corn silage dry matter content in a more efficient and timely manner.

Mycotoxins
It is extremely difficult to predict the chances of mycotoxin issues in silage. It is important to recognize that mycotoxins only develop on living plant tissue and therefore the necrotic tissue resulting from leaf diseases are not an indicator of potential mycotoxin risk.

Plant injury to living tissue, where mycotoxins can develop, such as feeding damage on the ears and stalk do offer a pathway for disease organisms and moisture to get into the plant and wet conditions late in the growing season can increase the chances of mold development. Again it is very important to understand there is not a clear causal relationship, even when an ear or stalk mold is present it is not a sure indication that mycotoxins will develop. It is important to work with your nutrition consultant at harvest to test for potential mycotoxin issues.

July 20, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Cornell Field Crops Professor Harold van Es Named 2017 Precision Ag Educator/Researcher of the Year

Precision Ag, a worldwide precision agriculture information and analysis organization and website, has named Dr. Harold van Es their 2017 Educator/Researcher of the Year.  Read more.

July 20, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Capital Area Ag Report – July 20, 2017

Capital Area Ag Report – July 20, 2017

This week’s Ag Report will just be this post.  I was in Utah last week for the National Association of Agricultural Agents.  At the tradeshow, they had a “steam generating machine” between the tractor and baler. Out there they have to add moisture to bale alfalfa so it does not crumble from the dryness.  What a contrast to our situation this year!

  • This week I scouted corn for diseases, as part of our fungicide trial.  All the plots were clean.
  • There was one report of armyworm last week.  Check all corn, grass, pastures, and small grain fields for armyworm.  There are spotty infestations in eastern NY.  If grasses do not regrow like normal, check for armyworm eating all the re-growth.
  • Spring barley is ripening, but not yet ready for harvest.  The more I learn about malting barley, the more I realize how tricky this crop can be.  Despite our weather, I have seen no head blight – thanks to timely fungicide applications.
  • Potato leafhopper have been severe since before I left.  Check alfalfa fields.  Adult PLH will migrate to a different field when alfalfa or clover is harvested.  Keep an eye on adjacent fields.
  • I am not sure what advice to give to dry hay growers.  Beef and horse owners are in tough shape since all their hay is still in the field.  Consider having uncut fields harvested for haylage and put in a pile or made into baleage.  If properly fermented, horses can eat haylage, but if the fermentation is bad, they can be quite sensitive.  It is a slight risk.  Also, a machine called the Macerator conditions haycrop after mowing.  It is basically a roller mill that speeds drying.  However, it also softens coarse hay.  So, if we do get any good hay weather, this would be a good machine to use on rank hay.  I only know of one in our area.

Hang in there.

Aaron Gabriel,
Sr. Extension Resource Educator, Agronomy
Cornell Cooperative Extension
415 Lower Main St.
Hudson Falls, NY 12839
518-380-1496 cell
518-746-2560 ofc
adg12@cornell.edu
 www.fieldcrops.org

Cornell Cooperative Extension
Capital Area Agriculture and Horticulture Program
http://blogs.cornell.edu/capitalareaagandhortprogram/

July 20, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Weather Outlook – July 20, 2017

Weather Outlook – July 20, 2017

NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below-normal to 3 degrees above-normal. Precipitation ranged from a quarter inch to over 3.5 inches. Base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 90 to 170.

Severe storms with heavy rain and strong winds possible Thursday afternoon into evening. Dry Friday into Saturday before unsettled weather returns…

Today temperatures will be throughout the 80’s, with low 90’s possible in southeast NY. Isolated showers and thunderstorms are possible, more likely for western into central NY. Some storms could be severe with the threat of heavy rain, damaging winds and hail. Flooding is possible where heavy rain falls due to the wet conditions. Overnight lows will be in the 60’s.

Friday will be mostly sunny and dry with temperatures again in the 80’s. Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

Saturday’s highs will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s, with cloudy conditions and evening showers and thunderstorms possible. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60’s.

Sunday, highs will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms likely. Overnight temperatures will be in the 60’s.

Monday’s highs will be in the 70’s to low 80’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms likely. Lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

Tuesday will have temperatures in the upper 60’s to low 80’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms possible.  Lows will be in the upper 50’s to mid 60’s.

Wednesday, temperatures will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s with scattered showers and thunderstorms possible.  Lows will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

The seven-day precipitation amounts will range from ½” to 2”.

The 8-14 day outlook (July 27-Aug 2) favors below-normal temperatures and above-normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.weather.gov/erh/

US Drought Monitor
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home.aspx

CLIMOD2 (NRCC data interface):
http://climodtest.nrcc.cornell.edu

 

 

July 19, 2017
by Cornell Field Crops
Comments Off on Soil Health Center: Farmer Panels, Keynote and More at 2017 Empire Farm Days

Soil Health Center: Farmer Panels, Keynote and More at 2017 Empire Farm Days

The New York State Working Group for Improved Soil Health has announced a full schedule of activities for the Soil Health Center at the August 8, 9 and 10 Empire Farm Days at Rodman Lott and Son Farms in Seneca Falls, NY.

Activities include daily USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service presentations, farmer panel discussions, cover crop field plot tours, a Wednesday-only keynote presentation with conservation biologist and invertebrate ecologist Carmen Greenwood, lunch sponsored by King’s AgriSeeds, and daily raffles of soil health tests from the Cornell Soil Health Lab and Dairy One and cover crop seed from Seedway.

The Tuesday, August 8 schedule includes:
. 9:30 am: Fertilizer, Manure and Nutrient Management, and Cycling in Cover Cropping and Reduced Tillage Systems with USDA NRCS Northeast Regional Soil Health Specialist Jim Hoorman, Findlay, OH

. 10:30 am: Empire Farm Days Cover Crops Field Demonstration Tour

. 11:30 am: Fertilizer and Nutrient Management in Cover Crops and Reduced Tillage Systems Farmer Panel with Jim Hershey, Hershey Farms, Elizabethtown, PA; Steve Cuddeback, Cuddeback Farms, Skaneateles, NY; John Kemmeren, Angel Rose Dairy, Bainbridge, NY; and moderator Janice Degni, Cornell SCNY Dairy and Field Crops Team Leader.

Pennsylvania No-Till Alliance President Jim Hershey has practiced no-till for more than 25 year and uses a five-way cover crop mix on his 600-acre livestock and grain farm in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. In 2016, Steve Cuddeback, an advocate for high calcium lime application with minimal tillage techniques to increase yields over time, harvested record yields of no-till soybeans and zone-tilled corn grain on this 800-acre cash crop farm. John Kemmeren has practiced no-till for 40 years, no-tilling 750 acres of corn, hay and pasture at his 750-acre dairy farm.

The Wednesday, August 9 schedule includes:
. 9:30 am: Preventing, Reducing and Mitigating Compaction and Its Impact on Soil Health and Crop Production with USDA NRCS Northeast Regional Soil Health Specialist Jim Hoorman, Findlay, OH

. 10:30 am: Empire Farm Days Cover Crops Field Demonstration Tour

. 11:30 am: Avoiding or Reducing Compaction Using Cover Crops, Reduced Tillage Systems and Other Management Strategies Farmer Panel with Janette Veazey-Post, Lamb Farms, Inc., Oakfield, NY; Joe Brightly, Brightly Farms, LLC, Hamlin, NY; Scott Potter, Dairy Support Services, Cortland, NY; Brad Macauley, Merrimac Farms Inc., Mount Morris, NY; and moderator Paul Salon, USDA NRCS Regional Soil Health Specialist.

Janette Veazey-Post co-manages a 12,000-acre progressive dairy farm, growing mostly strip-tilled corn and alfalfa. WNY Soil Health Alliance board member Joe Brightly grows grains, fresh and processing vegetables, and apples using strip tillage, cover crops and cover crop mixes, plus an interseeder he built for 2017. Since 1994, Scott Potter has provided forage production and application services to CNY dairy farms: 120 million gallons of manure per year, planting 1700 acres of corn, and harvesting 8000 acres of corn and haylage. Brad Macauley uses minimum till, cover cropping and double cropping to feed dairy cows and grow vegetable crops.

. 2:00 pm: Keynote Presentation and Demonstration: The Living Soil with Conservation Biologist Carmen Greenwood, SUNY Cobleskill

Dr. Carmen Greenwood will show how live soil-dwelling invertebrates, primarily soil mites, serve in vital ecosystem roles, provide conservation benefits, and act as indicators of soil health. Dr. Greenwood is an associate professor of entomology at SUNY Cobleskill and a member of the New York State Pollinator Task Force.

The Thursday, August 10 schedule includes:
. 9:30 am: Utilizing Soil Health Practices in Vegetable Cropping Systems with Dr. Thomas Bjorkman, Associate Horticulture Professor, Cornell University

. 10:30 am: Empire Farm Days Cover Crops Field Demonstration Tour

. 11:30 am: Utilizing Soil Health Practices in Vegetable Cropping Systems Farmer Panel with Josh Jurs, Kreher’s Farms, Clarence, NY; Dan Henry, W.D. Henry and Sons Farms, Eden, NY; Kurt Forman, Clearview Farms, Palmyra, NY; and moderator Darcy Telenko, Cornell Extension Vegetable Specialist.

Kreher’s Farm Crop Manager Josh Jurs is currently updating his 3000 organic acre cover crop program to incorporate different species to target a balance of soil health and biology and sustainability. Dan Henry’s soil health practices at W.D. Henry and Sons’ 400-acre fresh market vegetable farm include planned crop rotations and cover crops. Kurt Forman of certified organic Clearview Farm builds his wide variety of soils using cover crops, composted manure, and crop rotation, helping to control weeds and insect pests, and reducing the cost of nitrogen fertilizer.

Other features of the Soil Health Center at the 2017 Empire Farm Days include:
. Soil Health Work Group members with soil health literature, table top demonstrations and rainfall simulations illustrating how different management practices impact soil-water interaction;
. USDA NRCS soil scientists demonstrating the Web Soil Survey to print soil maps for producers;
.  demonstrations of the cell phone Soil Web App that allows you to view soils at your current location;
. USDA NRCS Conservation Client Gateway demonstrations for producers; and
. the New York Soil Health Trailer.

The Soil Health Center at Empire Farm Days is a cooperative effort of the New York State Soil Health Work Group comprised  of USDA NRCS, conservation districts, state government agencies, educational institutions, the Cornell University Soil Health program, cooperative extension, non-governmental organizations, farmers, private consultants, and agribusinesses working towards developing innovative solutions to improve soil health and raising awareness of soil health concepts by producers and ag service providers. For more information, contact Paul Salon at 607-562-8404 x 103, paul.salon@ny.usda.gov.

The Soil Health Center at Empire Farm Days was established in 2015 as a permanent site for soil health programming at the annual event that is the largest outdoor agricultural trade show in the northeastern U.S.

Empire Farm Days show hours are Tuesday-Wednesday 9 am to 5 pm and Thursday 9 am to 4 pm. Parking is $10 per vehicle. Visit www.empirefarmdays.com or call 877-697-7837 for more details.

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