Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 22, 2015

From Gary Bergstrom – Extension Plant Pathologist – Cornell University

Winter cereal fields in New York should be assessed for incidence of Fusarium head blight symptoms at this time to get some idea of the potential for DON contamination in grain.  Incidence has been observed from zero to over ten percent in individual fields.  Many fields of spring malting barley emerged from the boot over the past week and were sprayed with triazole fungicides at full head emergence.  Other spring cereals have not yet emerged from the boot.   Predicted risk of FHB is currently high for spring cereals flowering over the next few days in many areas of New York. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at  full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot) or at at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads).  There is an application window of approximately 6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Triazole applications at flowering should provide adequate protection against early developing rust, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf blotches on flag leaves. Leaf rusts and other foliar diseases are now fairly widespread on wheat and barley in New York.   Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently.

2015 Aurora Farm Field Day

2015-AFFD-FlyerThursday, July 16, 2015 at 9:00am to 3:00pm

Musgrave Research Farm (CUAES) 1256 Poplar Ridge Road Aurora, NY

New York’s farming community is invited to learn about the latest research on field crops, soil and pest management during the annual field day at Cornell University’s Musgrave Research Farm in Aurora, featuring farm tours, demonstrations and presentations.  Hosted by the Integrated Field Crop, Soil, and Pest Management Program Work Team in conjunction with Cornell Cooperative Extension and the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station.

  • Russ Hahn – Superweeds and other myths about herbicide resistance
  • Keith Waldron – Western Bean Cutworm and other field crop 2015 season pest updates
  • Bill Cox – Corn-soybean-wheat clover rotation under conventional and organic management in the organic transition year
  • Margaret Smith and Judy Kolkman – Northern leaf blight of corn: new research and breeding for resistance
  • Gary Bergstrom, Jaime Cummings, and Alyssa Cowles – Spring malting barley (variety x fungicide management)
  • Quirine Ketterings and Karl CzymmekNitrogen management topics
  • Harold Van Es, Aaron Ristow, Bob Schindelbeck2015 Updates on Soil Health and Adapt-N
  • Matt Ryan, Jeff Leibert, and Sandra WaymanWinter Cereal Cover Crops for Organic No-till Soybean

DEC Pesticide Re-certification and CCA credits requested.

Please distribute the flyer far and wide!

NNYADP Farm Research Evaluating Why Some Corn Fields Exceed Yield Expectations

Ketterings2014cornfield3003
Photo Credit: Quirine M. Ketterings

With research in the past 10 years showing notable exceptions in how well predictions of corn yield potential matched actual yields on North Country farms, the farmers of the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program wanted to learn more about the factors influencing the beyond-expectations success.

For science based, real time, on farm data, the NNYADP provided grant funding to Dr. Quirine M. Ketterings, director of the Cornell University Nutrient Management Spear Program in 2013-2015.

Ketterings and the Nutrient Management Spear Program are known for applied research that helps New York farmers more efficiently use the nutrients available in manure, crop rotations, and purchased fertilizer to support crop production and agricultural environmental stewardship.

Newer varieties of corn are higher yielding, as seen in the increase in average corn silage and grain yields in New York State over the past decades. Higher-yielding cornfields, however, do not necessarily require more nitrogen to obtain higher yields. Variations in management, soils, and many other factors impact actual nitrogen need.

‘The farmers were asking if higher yielding varieties require more nitrogen and that generated the idea to evaluate actual corn yields on Northern New York fields and to combine that with an assessment of nitrogen management,’ Ketterings explains.

In 2013 and 2014, Ketterings worked with farmers and farm advisors in Northern New York to compare actual corn yields with yield expectations based on the Cornell Soils Database that is itself the basis for Cornell’s nitrogen application guidelines.

The average yield across 36 cornfields in NNY for 2013 and 2014 combined was 113 bushels per acre, four bushels less than the average yield potential for all sites in the project. However, 25 percent of the 36 cornfields evaluated yielded more than 110 percent of the Cornell yield potential.

With a Northern New York Agricultural Development Program grant for 2015 work, Ketterings will evaluate yield potential using new field technology to gather data on three levels: per farm, per field, and within a field. The results are expected to contribute to the updating of the Cornell corn yield database.

‘The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program research is helping us develop an adaptive N management approach that allows for changes over time to build more precise management guidelines,’ Ketterings says.

The technology Ketterings is using in 2015 includes an optical sensor that evaluates corn plant vigor throughout the growing season based on changing field conditions.

‘It is too early to make changes to the Cornell Soils Database. With participation in this project by a large number of Northern New York farms, we can generate the database needed to support changes,’ Ketterings adds.

Ketterings suggests more farmers get involved in the project, invest in equipment that allows them to actually measure field yields, and share their yield data with the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program project leader.

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is a farmer-driven research and technical assistance program serving Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties. Funding for the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program is supported by New York State Senate leadership and is administered through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. For more information on crop production in Northern New York, visit www.nnyagdev.org.

Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 14, 2015

From Gary Bergstrom – Extension Plant Pathologist – Cornell University

Nearly all winter wheat in New York is now past the stage for application of fungicides.  The focus now shifts to spring cereals, particularly spring malting barley, many fields of which will reach full head emergence this week.   The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at  full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot) or at at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads).  There is an application window of approximately 6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Triazole applications at flowering should provide adequate protection against early developing rust, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf blotches on flag leaves.  Predicted risk of FHB is currently high for spring cereals flowering over the next few days in many areas of New York.  Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently.

Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 5, 2015

From Gary Bergstrom – Extension Plant Pathologist – Cornell University

The previously consistent forecast of ‘low’ risk of Fusarium head blight is now changing to ‘moderate’ or even ‘high’ risk in several locations in New York State following rains this week, with more rain forecast in the days ahead.  While nearly all winter barley and most winter winter fields have flowered and are beyond the growth stage for fungicide application, some late planted winter wheat has just begun flowering or is about to. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads) or at full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot).  There is an application window of approximately 6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Leaf rust has been observed on wheat in northwestern New York and should be expected in other parts of the state as well.  Triazole applications at flowering should provide adequate protection against early developing rust, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf blotches on flag leaves.  Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently.  I will also comment on conditions later this month as we approach flowering of spring cereals.

Fusarium Head Blight Alert – June 1, 2015

From Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

Generally dry conditions over the past 10 days, when most winter cereals initiated flowering in New York State, have resulted in a low forecast risk of Fusarium head blight epidemics.  However, general rains on May 30 and 31 with a forecast for more rain on June 1 may change the risk predictions for late flowering fields.  Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads) or at full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot).  There is an application window of approximately 6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Leaf rust has been observed on wheat in northwestern New York and should be expected in other parts of the state as well.  Triazole applications at flowering should provide adequate protection against early developing rust, powdery mildew, and fungal leaf blotches on flag leaves.

Receive FHB Alerts by Cell Phone:
I will be providing weekly New York commentaries on FHB risk through June.  You can subscribe to receive FHB Alerts directly to your Cell Phone (http://scabusa.org/fhb_alert.php).  You can select to receive alerts as 1) Text Message Alerts, 2) Email Alerts, or 3) both Text and Email Alerts.  To receive alerts for New York, select the Northern Soft Winter Wheat option which provides alerts for MI, NY, WI and VT.