Cornell Field Crops News

Timely Field Crops information for the New York Agricultural Community

June 28, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Managing Forage Stands under Water

Managing Forage Stands under Water

Prepared by Glenn Friesen, MAFRI Forage Specialist (BDS), Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives

Flooding a forage stand limits the amount of oxygen in the soil profile, and since plant roots require oxygen to remain healthy, plant productivity and survival is reduced when soil moisture levels are too high. There is no precise way to predict the flood damage to perennial forage fields. It is known that alfalfa is not very resistant to flooding, but reed canary grass can withstand prolonged flooding. Commonly used forage species are between these two extremes. Every field will react differently depending on the degree and duration of flooding, the species present, the age of stand, the health and vigor, fertility level, stage of development of the plant at the time of flooding and the temperature. Most alfalfa hay stands and pastures in the eastern and central parts of Manitoba will be delayed in harvesting due to either slowed spring growth or saturated soils. Below are some tips for accessing the condition of your pasture or hay land.

Alfalfa
Currently, above average spring precipitation has left some alfalfa stands suffering this spring. Alfalfa can generally withstand 1 to 2 weeks of fully saturated soils, whereas alsike clover is a little more tolerant at 2 to 3 weeks, and red clover likely the most tolerant at around 3 to 4 weeks. The extent of flood damage to fields can best be determined when the fields become dry enough to walk on. If stands are beginning to yellow from water logged soils, be prepared to assess the stand once growth continues. Assess your stand when alfalfa is about 6 inches in height using stems per square foot as your density measure. A stem density of 55 per square foot has good yield potential. There may be some yield loss when stem counts are between 40 and 50, and consider replacing the stand if there are less than 35-40 stems per square foot and the crown and root health is poor.

If the stand has been severely damaged, the only practical solution is to cultivate the field and re-seed. Seeding in the same field is possible if it is less than 2 years old; however it is recommended to use another field if the stand is older. Where the stand has been only partially damaged and is judged worth saving, weed control will become a problem because of the thinning-out of the stand. More herbicide options exist for grassy weed control in alfalfa than broadleaf weeds. Many fields have seen dandelion populations progress over the last few growing seasons, and unfortunately, there is no good option available for controlling them in alfalfa. Consider planting a new hay stand rather than spending good money and attempting to control them.

Re-seeding alfalfa–if necessary–should be done by mid-June. To increase the chances of establishing a stand at this later-than-normal seeding date, these fields should be seeded with a companion crop to protect the seedlings from hot weather. To minimize the competition effect, a half rate of oats or barley should be used. The cover crop should be harvested as silage to minimize seedling damage beneath the swath. Late summer seeding (August) of alfalfa may also be an option for soils with sufficient moisture; however does come with risk. In this case, it is recommended to seed without a cover crop, and seed early enough to ensure the plant receives at least 6 weeks of good growth before a killing frost.

Grass
Grasses as a group tolerate fully saturated soils more than alfalfa. Bromegrass will generally withstand over 3 weeks of saturation, while meadow fescue, meadow foxtail and timothy can withstand 6 weeks or more. However, if the stand has been severely damaged and cultivation is deemed the only solution, re-seeding of the grasses should be delayed until August. This will allow for good seedbed preparation.

June 28, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on New York State Weekly Weather Report – June 27, 2013

New York State Weekly Weather Report – June 27, 2013

Jessica Rennells, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 3 to 6 degrees above normal for most of the state.  Precipitation ranged from trace amounts up to 2 inches.  The base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 100-150.

Wet pattern continues.  Flood & Flash Flood watches out for most of the state today.

Today will be cloudy with rain spreading across the state throughout the day and into the evening.  Most areas will see 1-2” with localized amounts of 3”; Northern areas will see 2-3” with localized amounts of 4”.  Temperatures will be in the upper 70’s and low 80’s.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

Friday will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s with continued scattered showers.  Friday night will be in the upper 50’s and low 60’s.

Saturday highs will be in the mid 70’s to low 80’s with scattered showers likely.  Saturday night will be in the low to mid 60’s.

Sunday will be cloudy with scattered showers and highs in the upper 70’s to low 80’s.  Overnight lows will be in the low to mid 60’s.

**Potential significant hydrologic event for portions of the east coast late this weekend into midweek.  Keep up to date with NWS forecasts.**

Monday will be mostly cloudy with temperatures in the upper 70’s to low 80’s and scattered showers possible.  Overnight lows will be in the low to mid 60’s.

Tuesday will have scattered showers with highs in the upper 70’s and low 80’s.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

Wednesday temperatures will be in the upper 70’s and low 80’s with showers likely.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from 1” to over 3”.

The 8-14 day out look (July 4 – July 10) is showing above normal temperatures and above normal precipitation.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday):

http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

 

June 26, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Researchers Talk Small Grains at Field Day

Researchers Talk Small Grains at Field Day

Lancaster Farming, 6/15/2013

AURORA, N.Y. — Cornell Cooperative Extension hosted a small grains management field day at the Robert Musgrave Research Farm on June 6.

The rainy day kept the nearly 50 attendees and speakers indoors on hay bales, but minus the tour, the annual meeting kept to its agenda.

For the full article, click here.

June 24, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Join Us! 2013 Cornell Seed Growers Field Day July 2nd

Join Us! 2013 Cornell Seed Growers Field Day July 2nd

 COME & JOIN US!!!

2013 CORNELL SEED GROWERS FIELD DAY

Tuesday, 2 July 2013

For Seed Growers, Seed Treatment Applicators, and other Seed Professionals

NYSIP Foundation Seed Barn, 791 Dryden Rd., Rt. 366, Ithaca, NY

8:30 AM-12:00 noon

A full agenda can be found here.

June 24, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on 2013 Aurora Farm Field Day July 18th

2013 Aurora Farm Field Day July 18th

Presentation Topics

• Corn and Soybean Planting Date x Seeding Depth Studies

• Foliar Fungicides: Tools for Corn and Soybean Production in NY

• Western Bean Cutworm and other Field Crop Pests of 2013

• Soil Health, Adapt-N and Cover Crop Interseeding for Adaptation and Resilience

• Establishing Cool Season Forage Grasses in Roundup Ready Alfalfa

• Organic Cropping Systems Grain Trial

• Corn Breeding and Variety Testing for New York State

• Nutrient Management Update

 

Registration at 9:00 with Coffee and Donuts (no preregistration)

FREE Lunch will be available at 12:00 noon

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL!

 Questions:  Please call (607-255-2177) or email Mary McKellar (mem40@cornell.edu)

June 24, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on Crop Insurance Reminders for Those Affected by Vomitoxin

Crop Insurance Reminders for Those Affected by Vomitoxin

USDA, Risk Management Agency

Raleigh, North Carolina, June 20, 2013 – Weather conditions have made the fungus vomitoxin a threat to this year’s wheat crop.  Scott Lucas, Director of USDA’s Risk Management Agency’s (RMA) Raleigh Regional Office, offers reminders for producers with crop insurance.

If you think your wheat has vomitoxin, notify your crop insurance agent before you harvest the grain, put the grain in storage; or deliver it for sale. Your insurance provider will take samples for testing and submit them to an approved testing facility. Depending on the vomitoxin level present, the wheat price may be discounted or, in rare cases, the grain will need to be destroyed.

Vomitoxin levels can increase in storage. Therefore, losses are only insurable if the grain is tested at an approved testing facility before being moved into commercial storage.  A producer may also make arrangements with their insurance provider to leave representative sample areas of the unharvested crop. The adjuster will take samples from these areas for vomitoxin testing. Producers cannot collect their own samples. Samples must be collected by their insurance provider or a disinterested third party, such as an approved elevator.

 

A list of approved testing facilities can be found on our website:
http://www.rma.usda.gov/fields/nc_rso/2011/vomitoxin.pdf

Additional vomitoxin information can be found on the RMA websitehttp://www.rma.usda.gov/handbooks/25000/2013/13_25010-2h.pdf

Vomitoxin Testing Fact Sheet: http://www.rma.usda.gov/fields/nc_rso/2013/2013vomitoxin.pdf

Lucas urges all producers to contact their insurance agent with any questions concerning vomitoxin. Your crop insurance agent can provide you with additional information specific to your needs.

June 24, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report, June 21, 2013

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report, June 21, 2013

June 14, 2013                                                                Volume 12 Number 8

SUBCRIBE to the NEW! On-Line Version: NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report Online

New! Tweeter: NYS IPM Field Crops Twitter

Click here for the latest issue.

In this issue:

  1. View from the Field
  2. Weather Outlook
  3. Western Bean Cutworm Monitoring Begins
  4. Not too Early to think about Stored Grain Pests
  5. Growing Degree Days
  6. Clipboard Checklist
  7. Coming Events
  8. Contact Information 

June 24, 2013
by mem40@cornell.edu
Comments Off on New York State Weekly Weather Update – June 20, 2013

New York State Weekly Weather Update – June 20, 2013

Jessica Rennells, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from normal to 3 degrees below normal.  Precipitation ranged from trace amounts up to 3 inches.  The base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 50-100 for most of the state, less than 50 in parts of the Adirondacks.

Today high pressure brings sunny skies with temperatures in the mid 70’s to low 80’s.  Overnight temperatures will be in the upper 40’s to upper 50’s.

Friday will be mostly sunny with highs in the upper 70’s to mid 80’s.  Lows will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

Saturday will be partly sunny with afternoon showers and thunderstorms possible.  Highs will be in the upper 70’s to upper 80’s.  Saturday night will be in the low to mid 60’s.

Sunday will be partly sunny with highs in the low to mid 80’s and a chance of showers and thunderstorms.  Overnight lows will be in the mid 60’s.

Monday will be mostly sunny with temperatures in the low to mid 80’s with a chance of showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

Tuesday will be mostly sunny with highs in the mid to upper 80’s.  Continued chance for showers and thunderstorms.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

Wednesday temperatures will be in the low to mid 80’s with rain and thunderstorms possible.  Lows will be in the mid to upper 60’s.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from .1” to 1”.

The 8-14 day out look (June 27 – July 3) is showing above normal temperatures and above normal precipitation.

 

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday):

http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

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