NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report, May 31, 2013

May 31, 2013                                                                Volume 12 Number 6

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 In this issue:

  1. View from the Field
  2. Weather Outlook
  3. Quantifying Row Crop Plant Populations
  4. Fusarium head blight update
  5. Spring Related  Alfalfa Diseases
  6. Growing Degree Days
  7. Clipboard Checklist
  8. Coming Events
  9. Contact Information 

Fusarium Head Blight Update – May 31, 2013

Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

Heads have emerged and flowering has begun or will soon begin for most of the winter wheat and winter barley crops in New York State. This is a critical time for assessment of disease risk and for making a decision to apply an effective triazole fungicide, i.e., Caramba, Prosaro, or Proline, for suppression of Fusarium head blight (FHB), reducing the risk of deoxynivalenol (DON) contamination of grain, and protection of flag leaves from foliar diseases. The Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) currently projects a low risk of FHB infection, but this could change as warm, humid conditions with scattered showers are forecast through this weekend.  The extended forecast through the early grain-filling period calls for above-normal temperatures and precipitation that could favor development of fungal foliar diseases that are currently at low levels. There is an application window of approximately 5-6 days from the beginning of flowering (Feekes 10.5 in barley and Feekes 10.5.1 in wheat) in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.

New York State Weekly Weather Outlook – May 30, 2013

Jessica Rennells, NOAA Northeast Regional Climate Center, Cornell University

Last week temperatures ranged from 3 to 6 degrees below normal for most of the state.  Precipitation ranged widely from 1 inch up to 4 inches.  The base 50 growing degree-days ranged from 25 to 50.

Hot weather & storms before returning to seasonal temperatures.

Possible severe storms on Sunday.

Today will be mostly sunny and hot!  Temperatures will be in the mid 80’s to near 90 with a slight chance for afternoon showers or thunderstorms.  Overnight temperatures will range throughout the 60’s.

Friday will be mostly sunny and hot again; temperatures will rise into the upper 80’s and low 90’s with a chance for thunderstorms.  Overnight temperatures will range throughout the 60’s.

Saturday will be partly sunny with highs in the mid 80’s to near 90.  Light rain and thunderstorms are possible in the afternoon.  Lows will be in the low to mid 60’s.

Sunday will be mostly cloudy with highs cooler but still above normal, in the mid 70’s to low 80’s.  Showers and thunderstorms are likely as a front passes, some possibly severe.  Overnight lows will be in the mid 50’s to low 60’s.

Monday will be cloudy and notably cooler, but seasonable, because of the frontal passage.  Highs will be in the upper 60’s to mid 70’s with light rain possible.  Monday night will be in the upper 40’s to mid 50’s.

Tuesday will be mostly sunny with highs in the upper 60’s to low 70’s.  Lows will be In the upper 40’s to mid 50’s.

Wednesday will be in the upper 60’s to low 70’s.  Lows will be in the mid 40’s to near 50.

The five-day precipitation amounts will range from ½” to 1 ½” .

The 8-14 day out look (June 6 – June 12) is showing above normal temperatures and above normal precipitation.  Abnormally dry area reduced, still includes areas of Catskills, low Hudson Valley Region, Hamilton and Herkimer counties.

Maps of 8-14 day outlooks:
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/814day/index.php

National Weather Service watch/warnings map:
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/hq/

NRCC Drought Page which features the US Drought Monitor map (updated every Thursday):
http://www.nrcc.cornell.edu/page_drought.html

Reminder: 2013 Small Grains Management Field Day – June 6

Musgrave Research Farm, 1256 Poplar Ridge Road, Aurora, NY
Thursday June 6, 2013 The Program will run from 10:00am-12:00noon, registration begins at 9:30.

AGENDA

  • Crop development/ management Bill Cox, Prof. of Crop Science
  • Weed management Russ Hahn, Assoc. Prof. of Weed Science
  • Disease management Gary Bergstrom, Prof. of Plant Pathology
  • Small grain varieties Mark Sorrells, Prof. of Plant Breeding
  • Wheat grower practices Mike Stanyard, NY Field Crops Educator
  • Growing malting barley in New York Discussion with several speakers
  • Updates from all sectors of the small grains industry  Attendees

All are welcome to attend, no fee! Let us know if you plan to attend (mem40@cornell.edu)

For more information, please contact Mary McKellar at mem40@cornell.edu or 255-2177 or Gary Bergstrom at gcb3@cornell.edu.

An educational program of the Integrated Field Crop, Soil, and Pest Management Program Work Team in conjunction with Cornell Cooperative Extension with support from the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station.

1st Cutting Quality Summary – May 28 2013

Kevin H. Ganoe, Regional Field Crop Specialist, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team

The summary for the fourth and final week of our first cutting monitoring can be found here.

If you are not familiar with our procedures we use alfalfa height to predict Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF) for alfalfa, alfalfa/grass mixed and grass stands. Alfalfa height has proven to be a reliable indicator of NDF values in the field.

Delaware County Scissors Cut Report – May 24, 2013

Dale Dewing, Watershed Team Leader, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County, Watershed Agricultural Program

Hay Harvest is in full swing!

Lots of excellent quality forage was put in last week.  Grass and legumes continued to put on good growth with grass growing almost 6½ inches and legumes just over 4 inches, on average.  Only one field sampled was observed to be headed, but we would expect most others to begin heading this week.

Just over half of our sampling sites were harvested since sampling on May 14.  As of sampling on Tuesday, the remaining grass fields have reached the low to mid 50s NDF, still within the range we would consider good quality, but with the expectation of NDF advancing 0.75 – 1.2 points per day will pass the optimum range this week.  Mixed grass/legume fields are also at or passing peak quality, while mostly legume fields are just reaching optimum quality.

Second cutting is re-growing rapidly. We recommend harvesting 30-35 days after cutting for peak quality.  For fields harvested last week that would be week of June 17.

The data table below has each sample location, listed by Town and elevation, his year we have added a farm name as well. Data include the species sampled, average height, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and 24 hr. NDF Digestibility (NDFD).  You can get a pdf of the complete report here.

We have also updated the Google map of our sampling sites with this week’s results. Check it out.

We will sample again on May 28, and send a report on or about May 30.

Happy Harvesting.

 

NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report, May 23, 2013

May 23, 2013                                                                 Volume 12 Number 5

 

Alfalfa weevil damage.

SUBCRIBE to the NEW! On-Line Version: NYS IPM Weekly Field Crops Pest Report Online

New! Tweeter: NYS IPM Field Crops Twitter

  1. View from the Field
  2. Weather Outlook
  3. Barn Flies? – Early Season Efforts Will Pay Off
  4. Fusarium head blight update, May 23, 2013
  5. Biological Control of Alfalfa Weevil with Parasitoids
  6. Growing Degree Days
  7. Clipboard Checklist
  8. Contact Information 

Fusarium Head Blight Alert – May 23, 2013

Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

Winter wheat in much of New York State is at the flag leaf emerged to boot stages of development and heads will emerge over the next week.  Heads have already emerged in warmer regions of the Hudson Valley.  The next 14 days will be critical for farmers making fungicide spray decisions for suppression of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and protection of flag leaves from foliar diseases.  The triazole products Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads).  A flowering application of triazole fungicide should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rust, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields.  There is an application window of approximately 5-6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected.  Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. The forecast over the next several days is for cool weather that will slow development of Fusarium spores in the region. But the extended forecast for the final days of May into early June calls for a warming trend with significant chances for precipitation.   Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently as your crop approaches flowering.

Receive FHB Alerts by Cell Phone:

I will be providing weekly New York commentaries on FHB risk through mid-June.  You can subscribe to receive FHB Alerts directly to your Cell Phone (http://scabusa.org/fhb_alert.php).  You can select to receive alerts as 1) Text Message Alerts, 2) Email Alerts, or 3) both Text and Email Alerts.  To receive alerts for New York, select the Northern Soft Winter Wheat option which provides alerts for MI, NY, WI and VT.

1st Cutting Quality Summary – May 22, 2013

Kevin H. Ganoe, Regional Field Crop Specialist, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team

The third of our first cutting forage quality summaries is available here.  Our last report will be next week, May 28.

Last night’s rains  may slow down harvest but given how dry it has been I think we will gladly take it.

I am not sure all who receive this summary realize there is a group of CCE staff and project consultant who deserve credit for being out on farms gathering this information:

David R. Balbian, MS, PAS
Area Dairy Management Specialist
Phone: 1-518-312-3592
Email: drb23@cornell.edu

Robin Jerauld, PAS, CCA
Project Consultant
Phone: 607-643-1978
Email: rjerald@toast.net

Mark Schmidt
Project Technician
Nitrogen Management
Phone: 607-674-6025
Email: mschmidt@citlink.net

Karen Baase, MPS, PAS
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Madison County
Association Issue Leader
315-684-3001 Ext: 105
Email: kab21@cornell.edu

William R. Gibson
Cornell Cooperative Extension of Otsego County
Program Assistant
Phone: 607-547-2536 Ext:226
Email: wrg56@cornell.edu