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Disaster Education

Natural Disaster Preparedness & Education Fact Sheets & Web Links:

Recent weather related events have resulted in considerable residential, road, infrastructure and crop damages.  If you’ve not already contacted your insurance provider, please do so.  Additional contacts for resources, as you start long-term land based recovery are:

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Cayuga County                 Phone: 315-255-1183

248 Grant Avenue, Auburn, NY 13021

Links on our website help you navigate and find important information as it relates to storm loss or damage.

Cayuga County Farm Service Agency Phone: 315-253-8471

7413 County House Road, Auburn, NY 13021-9135

Handles concerns with agricultural businesses/entities who have suffered disaster damage to farmland (ie., gully washes or standing debris in crop fields).  Report this damage to FSA as soon as possible and try to document with photos when able.

Cayuga County Soil & Water Conservation District Phone: 315-252-4171

7413 County House Road, Auburn, NY 13021-9135

Offer services to help with engineering practices to repair erosion based, flood damaged fields and other situations.

New York Extension Disaster Education Network (New York EDEN)

http://eden.cce.cornell.edu/Pages/default.aspx

Agriculture-related Flood Recovery Fact Sheets

Ag Damage Assessment 

Agricultural Issues after a Flood

Dealing With Flooded Berry Fields 

Dealing with Flooded Vegetable Fields 

Crop Insurance & Disaster Resilience

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, Preventing

Farm Disaster Preparation Certificate 

Floods

Flood Safety Awareness, NOAA

Flood Safety & Recovery Resources

Don’t be Left in the Dark!  Weathering Floods, Storms and Power Outages

Emergency Food Worker’s Guide to Food Safety – assisting communities to plan and properly prepare and serve safe food in an emergency situation. 

Flooding  Quick Reference Guide:  What to do before, during, and after a flood

Preparing meals safely 

Gardens, Flooded 

Heat Wave

Keeping your Pets Safe In an Emergency

Severe Summer Storms 

Turn Around Don’t Drown 

Winter Storms

 

 

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