Cancer Research Education Day

A one day seminar on the science of cancer research
presented in lay language

Who’s invited? Everyone! We want to have a mix of community members (including those personally affected by cancer, family members, and the general public), graduate students, and undergraduate students.

We especially welcome survivors and advocates from Rochester, Buffalo, Syracuse, Binghamton and all points in-between.

Where: Weill Hall, Room 226, Cornell University
237 Tower Rd, Ithaca, NY 14850  (Free parking is available in an adjacent lot)

When: Saturday, September 7, 2019, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm.

Cost: Free! (Thanks to support from Engaged Cornell and Cornell’s Physical Science Oncology Center). Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Registration:  Although it’s free, please REGISTER by August 31 for our planning purposes.

Presentation Topics (Tentative)

  • CRISPR (We’ve heard the term, but what does it mean?)
  • More than the tumor: Understanding the microenvironment
  • How engineering contributes to our understanding of cancer
  • Tumor heterogeneity: Tumors are more complicated than we thought
  • Cancer Immunotherapy:  Will it revolutionize cancer treatment or just help a lucky few?
  • Precision Medicine in Cancer Care: The -omics age is here
  • Cancer metabolism and cancer treatment: Exploiting the synergy
  • Special presentations
    • From smoking to obesity. The new focus in cancer prevention (Professor Claudia Fischbach)
    • Understanding cancer begins with understanding DNA (Professor Robert Weiss)

Objectives

  • to provide community members an opportunity to learn about the science of cancer
  • to give graduate students experience in communicating the science of cancer to an audience of non-scientists
  • to connect cancer researchers-in-training with the survivor community
  • t0 expose undergraduate students to the world of oncology

Background

Cancer researchers at Cornell have partnered with the Cancer Research Center of the Finger Lakes since 2013. The collaboration connects graduate students in the basic sciences with individuals in the community personally affected by cancer. The students learn about the human side of cancer from community members, and community members learn about the science of cancer from the students. A fundamental objective is for everyone to learn about cancer using a common language. The partnership includes a semester long class as well as activities throughout the year.

The Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering and the College of Veterinary Medicine are the sponsoring  academic units involved in the partnership.

For more information: Bob Riter rnr45@cornell.edu


 

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