The 5 People you’ll find at Trillium

After working out yesterday morning, then going to two hours of class, I was understandably starving come 1:30 PM. To curb off the the hunger pangs, and waste time before my next class, I headed to Trillium to watch some back episodes of the Office, and eat some delicious soup! While I was in there, I happened to start looking around and people watching, which is when I noticed the wide variety of people that go to Trillium on an average day. I obviously had to write about it…

 

1. The Lunchers: Also known as the socialites. Here’s the thing about Trillium, ITS A DINING FACILITY! So obviously most people go there to get food. The typical lunch period will last for 30 mins tops. The lunchers however are a different breed of people; they take their dining experience seriously. They are the individuals who find each other, sit  for 2 hours, and pretend to have nothing better to do than hang out at that table, for an entire afternoon. Generally they do not disturb anyone, they’re just out for a good time. Beware though, the lunchers like their specific spaces…they tend to grab the same tables, at the same time, on the same days.

Where they’re located: The lower floor of Trillium, always in the middle of the floor at one of the tables that seats ~15 people.

What you can expect from them: Loud conversations, loud laughter, similar clothes, occupation of prime seating areas during prime eating time.

2. The Studiers: The brave, if not slightly delusional souls who believe they will get a solid study session hashed out in the middle of the Trillium madness. You will see them holed up with their books strewn about, headphone stuffed as far as possible into their ears, and a somewhat frazzled look on their face. Chances are they haven’t eaten in two days as it is, and are hoping that they can consume calories through osmosis while studying for their Orgo prelim. At this point they’ve tried every possible study area and are on their last leg. Give them a break, chances are they’ll cry if you look at them the wrong way.

Where they’re located: Anywhere their power cord can reach an outlet…or against the back wall, in the back corner of the bottom floor of the seating area.

What you can expect from them: Dirty looks if you sit too close to them at their table…forgive anything they say- they’re hungry and stressed.

3. The Athletes: Trillium is the closest dining hall for the Athletes to go to after/before practice, as it is the closest and only dining place by the athletics compound. Like the lunchers, they tend to spend a large amount of time in Trillium, and tend to have their ritualized tables. Sometimes you’ll see the male athletes mixing with the female athletes, but often times its teams banding together, unwinding after morning practice. The Athletes will likely be wearing their Teagles (standardized work-out clothes), and look like the grey-clad children of a Russian commune. The guys also consume HUGE amounts of food…but its okay because they work out enough that they need to. The athletes are good friends with the Trillium staff because of their early occupation hours, and the amount of time the spend there in general.

Where they’re located: Like the lunchers, they like large tables, in the middle of the room on the bottom floor.

What you can expect from them: A nice mix between rambunction and a functional work ethic!

4. The Tablers

Oh the tablers, the men and women who come to Trillium for a just cause….or to make you believe they have a just cause. Tabling is a prominent practice at Cornell to advertise for events being put on by organizations all over campus. Tabling is also awkward because you essentially sit in the same spot for 2 hours, stare into peoples’ souls and guilt them into buying a ticket/shirt/candy or whatever your organization is pawning off that day. Trillium is a great place to table because of the mass amount of people who migrate through every day. The tablers, however, tend to overstep their tabling duties when they get UP from their table and roam around the dining area, quartercarding (handing out tiny slips of paper explaining the event…another Cornell practice). As, at one point, a former tabler, I can say that this is an awkward experience and that these individuals are likely not tabling because they like it, they most likely HAVE to do it as part of some requirement/act of commitment.

Where they’re located: Right in front of the door as you walk into the lower level of Trillium….sometimes they migrate if they’re desperate.

What to expect: Awkward selling-points, slide shows, tri-folds, bright colors. Environmentally deadly quartercards, and hopeful glances as you walk through the door and make a bee-line to the salad line.

5. The Pit Stoppers

Finally, we get to the pit-stoppers. The individuals who may frequent Trillium, but do so for the soul purpose of grabbing lunch before their Marketing lecture in Call Auditorium. The Pit-Stoppers understand that Trillium fills the void between a sit down meal, and fast food…generally allowing the pitstopper to stop for 10 minutes or 30 minutes, depending on the occasion.

Where they’re located: The Pit-stoppers fill in the areas where the others don’t situate themselves; generally the windows on the bottom floor, and the tables on the top level. They want a seat where they can make a quick getaway when they realize they’re late to lecture, or need to go to Mann and print a problem set out.

What to expect: Not too much…likely catching up with the articles in the Cornell Daily Sun, or stalking Facebook to pass the time. They’re transients, and peacefully coexist in the Trillium social system.