From Project ArAGATS: Happy 15th Birthday!

With the close of the 2013 field season, Project ArAGATS found a fitting way to celebrate 15 years of research.

via: http://aragats.arts.cornell.edu/?p=592.

From Project ArAGATS: Iron 3 Tsaghkahovit

In the last day of the 2013 field season at Tsaghkahovit, Lori Khatchadourian and her team recovered a remarkable artifact from Room S of the Iron 3 town. The object is a ceramic spout rendered in the form of what appears to be a bull.

For more, follow the link: http://aragats.arts.cornell.edu/?p=593

From Project ArAGATS: EB Gegharot

The last few days on Gegharot’s West Citadel have brought a flurry of new information about the Early Bronze Age occupation of the site.  The complex stratigraphy is still being worked out but a series of superimposed floors, all with distinct hearth or hearth/oven features are helping us to put together a clearer picture.  

For more, follow the link below to the Project ArAGATS website.

via Project ArAGATS: Archaeology in the South Caucasus | The Joint American-Armenian Project for the Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies.

From Project ArAGATS: New Views on Gegharot’s East Citadel

An unfinished operation on Gegharot’s East Citadel has already yielded interesting results. In an area not far from the East Citadel shrine that we documented in 2011 we have opened a paved stone floor dating to the Late Bronze Age.

via Project ArAGATS: Archaeology in the South Caucasus | The Joint American-Armenian Project for the Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies.

From Project ArAGATS: 2013 Field Season Underway

Today is the fourth day of fieldwork for the 2013 Project ArAGATS excavations.  We are working at three sites this year: Gegharot Fortress, the Gegharot Kurgans, and the town at Tsaghkahovit.  Follow the progress of our work here:

via Project ArAGATS | The Joint American-Armenian Project for the Archaeology and Geography of Ancient Transcaucasian Societies.

Pets and Warriors

National Geographic posted a brief piece on the butchered dog remains from David Anthony and Dorcas Brown’s work at Krasnosamarskoe in the Volga.  You can read it at this link.  They make the fascinating argument that the killing of dogs was part of rites of initiation into a cohort of warriors. If this is indeed that case, it would raise a number of interesting questions pertinent to the long-standing controversy surrounding Napoleon Chagnon’s ethnographic work with the Yanomami.  If violence is socially inculcated within specific historical formations, as Anthony and Brown’s evidence suggests, then that would seem to close the chapter on the exaggerated claims of Chagnon’s initial study.

Upcoming: The Sovereign Assemblage: Sense, Sensibility, and Sentiment in the Bronze Age Caucasus

Upcoming Lecture Series

Institute for the Study of the Ancient World @ NYU.

The Sovereign Assemblage: Sense, Sensibility, and Sentiment in the Bronze Age Caucasus

Adam T. Smith (Cornell University)

April 8, 15, 22, & 29 at 6:00pm
Lecture Hall
15 East 84th St.
New York, NY

Series Abstract – The Sovereign Assemblage: Sense, Sensibility, and Sentiment in the Bronze Age Caucasus
The modern understanding of political association has centered resolutely on the person of the citizen, whose interactions with other members of the body politic establish and reproduce the possibilities and limits of sovereignty. However, rarely do we interact with one another directly as citizens. Rather, a vast assemblage of things, from ballots and bullets to crowns and regalia to licenses and permits, incessantly intrudes upon our political relations. What role has this assemblage played in the historical formation of our political practices? What principles fundamental to sovereignty does an archaeology of this assemblage reveal?

Taking the narrow isthmus of the Caucasus as their geographic focus, the lectures in this series describe the emergence of a complex set of material assemblages that originated in the Bronze Age yet continue to shape our politics today. The lectures provide a detailed account of the transformation of communities in the Caucasus from small-scale Early Bronze Age villages committed to an ideology of egalitarianism to Late Bronze Age complex polities predicated on radical inequality, organized violence, and a centralized apparatus of rule. These formidable social transformations were made possible by the efficacious operation of three critical assemblages, or machines, that reordered human communities. Each was vital to the operation of the next, forging the polity over time in the articulation of things and persons along three linked dimensions: sense, sensibility, and sentiment. It is by attending to these points of articulation between our things and our selves that we can illuminate the enduring sovereignty of the assemblage.

Monday, April 8: The Sovereignty of Assemblages

Monday, April 15: The Civilization Machine in the Early Bronze Age

Monday, April 22: The War Machine in the Middle Bronze Age

Monday, April 29: The Political Machine in the Late Bronze Age

About the Lecture Series
Michael I. Rostovzteff, a Russian ancient historian, came to the U.S. after the Russian Revolution and taught for many years at Yale University as Sterling Professor of Ancient History. Rostovtzeff’s prodigious energies and sprawling interests led him to write on an almost unimaginable range of subjects. ISAW’s Rostovtzeff series presents scholarship that embodies its aspirations to foster work that crosses disciplinary, geographical, and chronological lines. The lectures will be published by Princeton University Press.

Fourth Annual M.I. Rostovtzeff Lecture Series – The Sovereign Assemblage: Sense, Sensibility, and Sentiment in the Bronze Age Caucasus — Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.

Cornell Chronicle: New Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies

New press from the Cornell Chronicle on the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies:

The institute includes 18 faculty members and a postdoctoral researcher from five departments (anthropology, classics, history of art, landscape architecture and Near Eastern studies) and two colleges (Arts and Sciences; Agriculture and Life Sciences).

The complete story is here: Cornell Chronicle: Archaeology and material studies institute created.

Regimes and Revolutions Hits the Old World

Just released in the UK and Europe:

www.cambridge.org/authorcomms

Caucasus Panorama

This semester Cornell will host a speakers series focused on the Caucasus entitled “Caucasus Panorama”.  The poster with the slate of eminent visiting scholars is below.